Is this list of Arabic language variants correct?
Thread poster: Thomas Johansson

Thomas Johansson  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 08:07
Member (2005)
English to Swedish
+ ...
Jun 5, 2009

Hello,

I am constructing a list of languages in the world. The list is meant to be used on a website (e.g. for people to select their native language or to specify the language of an article they're posting and so on).

However, as for Arabic, there are many language variants and my sources all differ in the way they distinguish different language variants of Arabic. Below is the list I have come up with so far. (I have made considerable, but not exclusive, use of e.g. the list on http://www.ethnologue.org/language_index.asp?letter=A.)

I would be very grateful if anyone could take a brief look at this list and tell me what they think. Does the list make sense or does it contain any mistakes or is incomplete or is misleading or confusing in any way?

Here is the list, starting with Standard Arabic and then all language variants following, grouped by country. Gulf countries are grouped together in a single group last in the list.

I would really appreciate any comments.

Thank you,

Thomas

----------------------------------------------------

Arabic, Standard

---Afghanistan---
Arabic, Tajiki (Afghanistan)

---Algeria---
Arabic (Algeria)
Arabic, Algerian Spoken (Algeria)
Arabic, Algerian Saharan (Algeria)

---Chad---
Arabic, Babalia Creole (Chad)
Arabic, Shuwa (Chad)

---Cyprus---
Arabic, Cypriot (Cyprus)

---Egypt---
Arabic (Egypt)
Arabic, Eastern Egyptian Bedawi (Egypt)
Arabic, Egyptian Spoken (Egypt)
Arabic, Sa'idi (Egypt)

---Iraq---
Arabic (Iraq)
Arabic, Mesopotamian (Iraq)
Arabic, North Mesopotamian (Iraq)

---Israel---
Arabic, Judeo-Yemeni (Israel)
Arabic, Judeo-Tripolitanian (Israel)
Arabic, Judeo-Iraqi (Israel)
Arabic, Judeo-Moroccan (Israel)
Arabic, Judeo-Tunisian (Israel)

---Jordan---
Arabic (Jordan)
Arabic, South Levantine (Jordan)

---Lebanon---
Arabic (Lebanon)

---Libya---
Arabic (Libya)

---Mauritania---
Arabic, Hassaniyya (Mauritania)

---Morocco---
Arabic (Morocco)
Arabic, Moroccan Spoken (Morocco)

---Oman---
Arabic (Oman)
Arabic, Dhofari (Oman)
Arabic, Omani Hadari (Oman)

---Saudi Arabia---
Arabic (Saudi Arabia)
Arabic, Hijazi (Saudi Arabia)
Arabic, Najdi (Saudi Arabia)

---Sudan---
Arabic, Sudanese Creole (Sudan)
Arabic, Sudanese Spoken (Sudan)

---Syria---
Arabic (Syria)
Arabic, North Levantine (Syria)

---Tunisia---
Arabic, Tunisian (Tunisia)

---Uzbekistan---
Arabic, Uzbeki (Uzbekistan)

---Yemen---
Arabic (Yemen)
Arabic, Hadrami (Yemen)
Arabic, Sanaani (Yemen)
Arabic, Ta'izzi-Adeni (Yemen)

---Gulf area---
Arabic, Gulf
Arabic, Baharna (Bahrain)
Arabic (Kuwait)
Arabic (Qatar)
Arabic (U.A.E.)
Arabic, Shihhi (U.A.E.)

----------------------------------------------------


 

Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:07
English to Arabic
+ ...
First thoughts Jun 5, 2009

Hi Thomas,

Bearing in mind that I - at least - am a translator and not specialised in language variants, here are my initial thoughts.
You're saying that the purpose of your list is
to be used on a website (e.g. for people to select their native language or to specify the language of an article they're posting and so on).


This purpose seems quite basic, and it would be unthinkable for users of such a site to expect such a detailed list of dialects!

If they're going to post an article in Arabic, chances are it's in standard Arabic anyway, unless it's not an "article" in the literal sense of the word, but e.g. a blog entry that's been written in the writers dialect (you would never find a magazine or journal article written in dialect anyway).

So personally, if I understand the purpose of your website correctly, I would just put "standard Arabic", unless you are really interested in knowing users' dialects.

Even in that case, I would eliminate a considerable number of dialects on your list. E.g. my first reaction to seeing "Tajiki" on the list was to say "that is not Arabic", but looking "Tajiki Arabic" up I found that it's a declining form of Persianized Arabic spoken by some 1,000 people in Tajikstan. This is not a variant I would expect to find in a drop-down list of Arabic dialects. Similar thoughts for Cypriot.

Also, if you did want to include dialects, I would think it's enough to only have ONE entry for each country (e.g. no need for several variants of Algerian, or Yemeni etc).

And finally, for heaven's sake, it's Palestinian Arabic, not Israeli Arabic!! That at least we can claim!!

[Edited at 2009-06-05 12:31 GMT]


 

zkt  Identity Verified
Lebanon
Local time: 15:07
English to Arabic
+ ...
Totally agree with Nesrin Jun 5, 2009

Standard arabic is sufficent.

 

Thomas Johansson  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 08:07
Member (2005)
English to Swedish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
clarification and some follow-up questions Jun 5, 2009

So personally, if I understand the purpose of your website correctly, I would just put "standard Arabic", unless you are really interested in knowing users' dialects.


Thank you for your comments, Nesrin. Without being able to go into much detail about the site as such right now, I can at least say that one of its aims will be to achieve a high degree of linguistic detail in all user activities and to be able to be customized with detailed linguistic settings.

Also, the list I am making right now will actually not per se be included on the website, but will rather serve as a general basis from which specific language lists for different purposes can be derived (e.g. as a basis for deriving lists of user languages, forum language topics, etc.).

Also, I should perhaps point out that it is also my hope that other websites may be able to find the list useful eventually, so it needs to be created with a view to a wide range of conceivable applications.

For these reasons, I prefer to reach as much detail as possible at this stage in order to have a detailed and consistent language database available from which more specific lists later can be created for different specific purposes.

Anyway, as for "Standard Arabic" specifically, I have a question:

Is the Standard Arabic which is spoken in different parts of the world the same in those different parts (for instance, Morocco vs. Saudi Arabia vs. Syria) or does it differ somewhat between different parts? (I would imagine Arabic perhaps to be a little bit like Spanish, which is similar in the entire Spanish-speaking world but still differs a little between e.g. Spain, Mexico, and Chile.)

Also, I just remember having heard once that the Arabic spoken in the Maghreb is very different from the Arabic spoken elsewhere in the Arabic-speaking world. Would this refer to (i) a special Maghreb variant of Standard Arabic specifically or (ii) a Maghreb variant of just Arabic as such, next to and separate from Standard Arabic as such?

Even in that case, I would eliminate a considerable number of dialects on your list. E.g. my first reaction to seeing "Tajiki" on the list was to say "that is not Arabic", but looking "Tajiki Arabic" up I found that it's a declining form of Persianized Arabic spoken by some 1,000 people in Tajikstan. This is not a variant I would expect to find in a drop-down list of Arabic dialects. Similar thoughts for Cypriot.


Do you mean (i) that these languages are too small and perhaps insignificant to be included on the list or (ii) that, although historically related to Arabic, they are too different from other forms of Arabic and perhaps better should be represented as languages of their own (presumably as "Tajiki" respectively "Cypriot")?

Also, if you did want to include dialects, I would think it's enough to only have ONE entry for each country (e.g. no need for several variants of Algerian, or Yemeni etc).


Well, I think that if there really are different dialects of Arabic spoken in e.g. Algeria (and if these have a certain degree of difference between themselves), I would personally prefer to include them all in my list, actually. (For the reasons I gave at the top of this post.)

For this reason, it would e.g. be very helpful if anyone who is familiar with the particular linguistic panorama of a certain country, could let me know whether the items listed for that particular country make sense given that particular linguistic panorama.

And finally, for heaven's sake, it's Palestinian Arabic, not Israeli Arabic!! That at least we can claim!!


My first thought was that this should not be a problem at all. However, I just now checked up e.g. "Arabic, Judeo-Yemeni", and it appears to refer to a version of Arabic spoken by Jewish people, who I assume would find a reference to Israel less confusing than one to Palestine (since it appears to me that "Palestine" often is used specifically for the West Bank and the Gaza strip, whereas I suppose they live in other parts).

[Edited at 2009-06-05 15:58 GMT]


 

Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:07
English to Arabic
+ ...
Some replies... Jun 5, 2009

Hi again Thomas,

Thomas Johansson wrote:

Thank you for your comments, Nesrin. Without being able to go into much detail about the site as such right now, I can at least say that one of its aims will be to achieve a high degree of linguistic detail in all user activities and to be able to be customized with detailed linguistic settings.


Thanks for clarifying. In that case, you will need dialects, and it's hard for us to decide how detailed the "high degree of linguistic detail" you refer to is. However, you would of course have to be consistent. For example, I don't know if you're taking the ethnologue.org as a reference for other languages as well, but I've noticed that there is no similar subdivision for German, even though the Swiss, the Berlin and the Cologne dialects (and many more) are definitely distinct from standard German, and certainly much more distinct from each other than, say, Hijazi Saudi Arabian is from Najdi Saudi Arabian!

Anyway, as for "Standard Arabic" specifically, I have a question:
Is the Standard Arabic which is spoken in different parts of the world the same in those different parts (for instance, Morocco vs. Saudi Arabia vs. Syria) or does it differ somewhat between different parts? (I would imagine Arabic perhaps to be a little bit like Spanish, which is similar in the entire Spanish-speaking world but still differs a little between e.g. Spain, Mexico, and Chile.)


Standard Arabic is not a "spoken" language. It is the language used in written documents, literature, newspapers, official documents, etc. It's the language of education. It's also used in news bulletins, formal interviews etc (so on these occasions it is "spoken"). This Arabic is standard across the Arab world, with a few minor local differences in terminology (so you can sometimes identify a Moroccan news item by certain vocabulary used there which is not used in other Arab countries).

Also, I just remember having heard once that the Arabic spoken in the Maghreb is very different from the Arabic spoken elsewhere in the Arabic-speaking world. Would this refer to (i) a special Maghreb variant of Standard Arabic specifically or (ii) a Maghreb variant of just Arabic as such, next to and separate from Standard Arabic as such?


That would refer to the Moroccan dialect of Arabic. It is not Standard Arabic.


Do you mean (i) that these languages are too small and perhaps insignificant to be included on the list or (ii) that, although historically related to Arabic, they are too different from other forms of Arabic and perhaps better should be represented as languages of their own (presumably as "Tajiki" respectively "Cypriot")?


I'm not an expert in either, but my opinion is that (i) and (ii) apply.

Also, if you did want to include dialects, I would think it's enough to only have ONE entry for each country (e.g. no need for several variants of Algerian, or Yemeni etc).


Well, I think that if there really are different dialects of Arabic spoken in e.g. Algeria (and if these have a certain degree of difference between themselves), I would personally prefer to include them all in my list, actually. (For the reasons I gave at the top of this post.)

For this reason, it would e.g. be very helpful if anyone who is familiar with the particular linguistic panorama of a certain country, could let me know whether the items listed for that particular country make sense given that particular linguistic panorama.


As I said above, it's entirely up to you how detailed you want to go. As you suggest, you may need to get opinions of a lot of people from a lot of Arab countries who can tell you about the individual dialects listed for their countries.

As an Egyptian, I can tell you that for the listed
Arabic (Egypt)
Arabic, Eastern Egyptian Bedawi (Egypt)
Arabic, Egyptian Spoken (Egypt)
Arabic, Sa'idi (Egypt)

The first item "Arabic (Egypt)" is unnecessary, cause that appears to refer to the "Egyptian variety of Standard Arabic", and as I already pointed above, differences in Standard Arabic are very small.
"Eastern Egyptian" is fine, and Saidi is fine, but why have a general item entitled "Egyptian spoken", as if the former two are not spoken? I would understand if the third item was "Cairene Arabic" or "Lower Egyptian Arabic". And if we wanted more detail the list could go on - Siwa Arabic, Port Said Arabic, etc.
So just looking at Egypt the list is not very consistent.

And finally, for heaven's sake, it's Palestinian Arabic, not Israeli Arabic!! That at least we can claim!!


My first thought was that this should not be a problem at all. However, I just now checked up e.g. "Arabic, Judeo-Yemeni", and it appears to refer to a version of Arabic spoken by Jewish people, who I assume would find a reference to Israel less confusing than one to Palestine (since it appears to me that "Palestine" often is used specifically for the West Bank and the Gaza strip, whereas I suppose they live in other parts).

I too reconsidered my initial comment when I so the word Judeo- preceding the dialect. However, it still means that "Palestinian" is missing from the list, and Palestinian is most certainly a distinctive dialect, no matter where Palestinians are living, and may be subdivided even further.

HTH


 

Thomas Johansson  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 08:07
Member (2005)
English to Swedish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
great! Jun 5, 2009

Great, thank you, these are all extremely helpful points and clarifications that I definitely will work on tonight.

For now, just some comments on two issues:

In that case, you will need dialects, and it's hard for us to decide how detailed the "high degree of linguistic detail" you refer to is. However, you would of course have to be consistent. For example, I don't know if you're taking the ethnologue.org as a reference for other languages as well, but I've noticed that there is no similar subdivision for German, even though the Swiss, the Berlin and the Cologne dialects (and many more) are definitely distinct from standard German, and certainly much more distinct from each other than, say, Hijazi Saudi Arabian is from Najdi Saudi Arabian


Yes, I have been using the Ethnologue as one (main) reference, and of course they are not very consistent due to the nature of their project.

I have been using the word "dialect" only because it's a common way to refer to language variants. Unfortunately it is a very ambiguous term.

So, to be more precise about the goal, it is not so much to include each and every imaginable dialect in the list, but rather to include those "linguistic entries" which either
(i) it is customary to make a distinction between (as e.g. the distinction between British and American English) or
(ii) are not mutually intelligible with other language versions, with "not being mutually intelligible" meaning that speakers of the different versions either have great or noticeable difficulty understanding each other or speak in very or noticeably different ways (e.g. grammatically, lexically or phonetically...).

I know this "definition" is vague. The point is just that while the list should be somewhat refined and practically useful in distinguishing real differences, it should still not exaggerate...

As for Swiss German, I do believe it would be appropriate to distinguish it as a separate version of German for the purposes of my list (for both reason (i) and reason (ii) above).

"Eastern Egyptian" is fine, and Saidi is fine, but why have a general item entitled "Egyptian spoken", as if the former two are not spoken?


Well, the reason I have included it in the list is solely because the Ethnologue includes it in its list at http://www.ethnologue.org/language_index.asp?letter=A, suggesting -for all I know- that it is intended to refer to some specific variant of Arabic (also referred to as "Lower Egypt Arabic, Normal Egyptian Arabic, Massry").
They have more information about this particular language entry here: http://www.ethnologue.org/show_language.asp?code=arz

According to their entry, "Egyptian Spoken Arabic" would be spoken by approx. 44 million people. However, I also saw at the Wikipedia article on Egypt that the country has a population of 76 million. Which would leave 32 million unaccounted for. That's why included the other entries.

If you have a better suggestion of how to approach Egypt and its one or various forms of Arabic, please do let me know! (That's why I posted this thread.)


[Edited at 2009-06-05 19:21 GMT]


 

shfranke
United States
Local time: 05:07
English to Arabic
+ ...
Agrewe with Nesrin re written Arabic text will be 99.999999% in MSA Jun 5, 2009

Greeting.

I wish to agree with, and second, Nesrin's good comments.

Materials in word-processed and/or hand-written Arabic text will be 99.999999% in MSA.

Re Nesrin's observation about "... how different (spoken colloquial) Hijazi Saudi Arabic is from Najdi Saudi Arabic!"

One can add to that some of the other and more-local dialects heard in central-northern KSA, such as Nefudi dialect used around al-Qaseem, al-Bureidah, and al-Jowf.

Much the same sorts of distinctions can be heard and noted within the al-Hijaz area, such as the colloquials prevalent in Mekka, Jeddah, and al-Ta'if.

It would seem that unless a searcher of that proposed website already has a recorded -- and identified -- audio sample of colloquial Arabic speech on file, searching for a particular dialect would entail extraneous work.

One might also consider the phenomena of "Arabish" (hybrid of Arabic and English), often-used Arabizations of foreign terms and expressions, and an emerging Arabic creole which is notable in the GCC countries that are now home to Arabic-speakers from other out-of-region countries of origin. Those cannot be categorized, much due to their dynamic and changing nature.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Stephen H. Franke
(Arabic dialectologist)
San Pedro, California


---------------------------------------------

Hi again Thomas,

Thomas Johansson wrote:

Thank you for your comments, Nesrin. Without being able to go into much detail about the site as such right now, I can at least say that one of its aims will be to achieve a high degree of linguistic detail in all user activities and to be able to be customized with detailed linguistic settings.


Thanks for clarifying. In that case, you will need dialects, and it's hard for us to decide how detailed the "high degree of linguistic detail" you refer to is. However, you would of course have to be consistent. For example, I don't know if you're taking the ethnologue.org as a reference for other languages as well, but I've noticed that there is no similar subdivision for German, even though the Swiss, the Berlin and the Cologne dialects (and many more) are definitely distinct from standard German, and certainly much more distinct from each other than, say, Hijazi Saudi Arabian is from Najdi Saudi Arabian!

Anyway, as for "Standard Arabic" specifically, I have a question:
Is the Standard Arabic which is spoken in different parts of the world the same in those different parts (for instance, Morocco vs. Saudi Arabia vs. Syria) or does it differ somewhat between different parts? (I would imagine Arabic perhaps to be a little bit like Spanish, which is similar in the entire Spanish-speaking world but still differs a little between e.g. Spain, Mexico, and Chile.)


Standard Arabic is not a "spoken" language. It is the language used in written documents, literature, newspapers, official documents, etc. It's the language of education. It's also used in news bulletins, formal interviews etc (so on these occasions it is "spoken"). This Arabic is standard across the Arab world, with a few minor local differences in terminology (so you can sometimes identify a Moroccan news item by certain vocabulary used there which is not used in other Arab countries).

Also, I just remember having heard once that the Arabic spoken in the Maghreb is very different from the Arabic spoken elsewhere in the Arabic-speaking world. Would this refer to (i) a special Maghreb variant of Standard Arabic specifically or (ii) a Maghreb variant of just Arabic as such, next to and separate from Standard Arabic as such?


That would refer to the Moroccan dialect of Arabic. It is not Standard Arabic.


Do you mean (i) that these languages are too small and perhaps insignificant to be included on the list or (ii) that, although historically related to Arabic, they are too different from other forms of Arabic and perhaps better should be represented as languages of their own (presumably as "Tajiki" respectively "Cypriot")?


I'm not an expert in either, but my opinion is that (i) and (ii) apply.

Also, if you did want to include dialects, I would think it's enough to only have ONE entry for each country (e.g. no need for several variants of Algerian, or Yemeni etc).


Well, I think that if there really are different dialects of Arabic spoken in e.g. Algeria (and if these have a certain degree of difference between themselves), I would personally prefer to include them all in my list, actually. (For the reasons I gave at the top of this post.)

For this reason, it would e.g. be very helpful if anyone who is familiar with the particular linguistic panorama of a certain country, could let me know whether the items listed for that particular country make sense given that particular linguistic panorama.


As I said above, it's entirely up to you how detailed you want to go. As you suggest, you may need to get opinions of a lot of people from a lot of Arab countries who can tell you about the individual dialects listed for their countries.

As an Egyptian, I can tell you that for the listed
Arabic (Egypt)
Arabic, Eastern Egyptian Bedawi (Egypt)
Arabic, Egyptian Spoken (Egypt)
Arabic, Sa'idi (Egypt)

The first item "Arabic (Egypt)" is unnecessary, cause that appears to refer to the "Egyptian variety of Standard Arabic", and as I already pointed above, differences in Standard Arabic are very small.
"Eastern Egyptian" is fine, and Saidi is fine, but why have a general item entitled "Egyptian spoken", as if the former two are not spoken? I would understand if the third item was "Cairene Arabic" or "Lower Egyptian Arabic". And if we wanted more detail the list could go on - Siwa Arabic, Port Said Arabic, etc.
So just looking at Egypt the list is not very consistent.

And finally, for heaven's sake, it's Palestinian Arabic, not Israeli Arabic!! That at least we can claim!!


My first thought was that this should not be a problem at all. However, I just now checked up e.g. "Arabic, Judeo-Yemeni", and it appears to refer to a version of Arabic spoken by Jewish people, who I assume would find a reference to Israel less confusing than one to Palestine (since it appears to me that "Palestine" often is used specifically for the West Bank and the Gaza strip, whereas I suppose they live in other parts).

I too reconsidered my initial comment when I so the word Judeo- preceding the dialect. However, it still means that "Palestinian" is missing from the list, and Palestinian is most certainly a distinctive dialect, no matter where Palestinians are living, and may be subdivided even further.

HTH [/quote]


 

Thomas Johansson  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 08:07
Member (2005)
English to Swedish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Revised List Jun 6, 2009

I am really grateful for all these comments. I have now revised the list, please see below.

A few remarks about this revised list:

- I kept the entries for Tajiki and Cypriot Arabic, since they indeed appear to refer to varieties of Arabic (although spoken by very small communities). (Having too many language entries or lots of small languages in my database is not a problem.)

- I deleted all country-specific references to Standard Arabic, since it appears to be basically the same in all countries.

- However - and this may perhaps be a controversial point - I added entries for spoken varieties of Arabic in Lebanon, Libya, and Palestine (since otherwise it would seem my list would not include spoken varieties for Arabic-speaking people in those countries).
Thus, there are these new entries:
Arabic, Lebanon Spoken
Arabic, Libyan Spoken
Arabic, Palestine Spoken
This may possibly be inconsistent with other entries:
Would there e.g. not be conflicts between
"Arabic, Lebanese" and "Arabic, North Levantine Spoken"; and between
Arabic, Palestine Spoken" and "Arabic, South Levantine Spoken"?

- I added the word "Spoken" to all varieties that are primarily spoken varieties and not Standard Arabic.

- I deleted a few entries in the Gulf area.

What do you think? Any comments, criticisms, question marks...?

Thomas

----------------------------------------------------

Arabic, Standard

---Afghanistan---
Arabic, Tajiki Spoken (Afghanistan)

---Algeria---
Arabic, Algerian Spoken (Algeria)
Arabic, Algerian Saharan Spoken (Algeria)

---Chad---
Arabic, Babalia Creole Spoken (Chad)
Arabic, Shuwa Spoken (Chad)

---Cyprus---
Arabic, Cypriot Maronite Spoken (Cyprus)

---Egypt---
Arabic, Eastern Egyptian Bedawi Spoken (Egypt)
Arabic, Egyptian Spoken (Egypt)
Arabic, Sa'idi Spoken (Egypt)

---Iraq---
Arabic, Mesopotamian Spoken (Iraq)
Arabic, North Mesopotamian Spoken (Iraq)

---Israel---
Arabic, Judeo-Yemeni Spoken (Israel)
Arabic, Judeo-Tripolitanian Spoken (Israel)
Arabic, Judeo-Iraqi Spoken (Israel)
Arabic, Judeo-Moroccan Spoken (Israel)
Arabic, Judeo-Tunisian Spoken (Israel)

---Jordan---
Arabic, South Levantine Spoken (Jordan)

---Lebanon---
Arabic, Lebanon Spoken (Lebanon)

---Libya---
Arabic, Libyan Spoken (Libya)

---Mauritania---
Arabic, Hassaniyya Spoken (Mauritania)

---Morocco---
Arabic, Moroccan Spoken (Morocco)

---Oman---
Arabic, Dhofari Spoken (Oman)
Arabic, Omani Hadari Spoken (Oman)

---Palestine---
Arabic, Palestine Spoken (Palestine)

---Saudi Arabia---
Arabic, Saudi Arabia Spoken (Saudi Arabia)
Arabic, Hijazi Spoken (Saudi Arabia)
Arabic, Najdi Spoken (Saudi Arabia)

---Sudan---
Arabic, Sudanese Creole (Sudan)
Arabic, Sudanese Spoken (Sudan)

---Syria---
Arabic, Syrian Spoken (Syria)
Arabic, North Levantine Spoken (Syria)

---Tunisia---
Arabic, Tunisian Spoken (Tunisia)

---Uzbekistan---
Arabic, Uzbeki Spoken (Uzbekistan)

---Yemen---
Arabic, Yemen Spoken (Yemen)
Arabic, Hadrami Spoken (Yemen)
Arabic, Sanaani Spoken (Yemen)
Arabic, Ta'izzi-Adeni Spoken (Yemen)

---Gulf area---
Arabic, Gulf Spoken
Arabic, Baharna Spoken (Bahrain)
Arabic, Shihhi Spoken (U.A.E.)

----------------------------------------------------


[Edited at 2009-06-06 16:02 GMT]

[Edited at 2009-06-06 17:53 GMT]


 


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