Client requires certificate of correctness
Thread poster: Åsa_Maria K

Åsa_Maria K  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 21:59
English to Swedish
+ ...
Apr 1, 2008

Hi!

A client of mine says "We need you send an certificate to prove the document is correct".

Is this a common practice? Isn´t it understood that a translation is supposed to be correct even without a certificate stating it?


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xxxBrandis
Local time: 21:59
English to German
+ ...
not a regular practise... Apr 1, 2008

However - I would just send " to the best of my knowledge and experience I promise / certify that the delivered translation is full and complete." Brandis

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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 21:59
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
I've had this once Apr 1, 2008

Åsa_Maria K wrote:
Is this a common practice? Isn´t it understood that a translation is supposed to be correct even without a certificate stating it?


If it makes the client feel happier, I see no reason to supply it.


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Paul Merriam  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:59
Member (2008)
Russian to English
+ ...
Clarify Apr 1, 2008

What does the client want?

Does the client need a statement that the translation is accurate? You should be willing to provide that. The client probably thinks you're in a better position than they are to determine whether the translation is accurate. (They did, after all, hire you rather than doing it themselves.) I don't see a problem here.

Do they need you to certify the content of the document? That's something entirely different. You should refuse to do that unless you have a way to check that.

I would ask the client for the wording needed and proceed from there.


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Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:59
English to Arabic
+ ...
Declaration Apr 1, 2008

I suppose what they mean is that you submit, along with the translation, a document stating that you've translated the document to the best of your abilities and that it is true and accurate as far as you know.

In the UK, members of the ITI can certify translations (as, I think, sworn translators do in the USA and other countries), by attaching such a declaration to the translation.
The wording suggested by the ITI is:

"I, the undersigned, [name], Member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting, [other qualifications], * declare that the translation of the attached documents [identifying
particulars] is to the best of my knowledge and belief a true and faithful rendering of the original [language], done to the best of my ability as a professional translator [and
verified by [name and ITI membership qualification]].
[signature] "

I don't know, however, if such a declaration makes any sense if you're not a sworn translator or a member of a professional body like the ITI.


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Åsa_Maria K  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 21:59
English to Swedish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Short statement Apr 1, 2008

Thanks to all of you for your quick replies.

I suppose that what the client wants is, as Nasrin suggests, a document stating that "I've translated the document to the best of my abilities and that it is true and accurate as far as I know."

I had just never heard of this before.

Cheers, Åsa


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Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 13:59
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
For certified translations Apr 1, 2008

I attach such declarations all the time but then it is for certified translations that also have my stamp on them. I would point out to the client that such a declaration in itself does not make the document certified.

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Paul Merriam  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:59
Member (2008)
Russian to English
+ ...
Ask the client Apr 1, 2008

Certificates such as you describe are common. But your client should be able to tell you what he/she/it needs. Read the wording carefully and do not simply sign the certification unless you are satisfied that you are willing to attest to whatever you have been asked to attest to.

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Tatty  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:59
Spanish to English
+ ...
I think the effect of the certifying statement is to shift liability Apr 1, 2008

I think the effect of adding the certifying statement is to shift liability from themselves onto you, agencies trying to wriggle their way out of their responsibilities again the cheapest way possible.

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Astrid Elke Witte  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:59
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
The idea of liability occurred to me Apr 1, 2008

I would be careful about signing any statement. The purpose of it could be to guarantee that the agency does not have to check over the translation - even superficially for typing or formatting errors - before sending it to the end client. Then, if the client complains about some small thing, the agency would have no liability, and you would have it all.

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Marina Soldati  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 17:59
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Be careful! Apr 1, 2008

Hi Maria

If I were to issue a certificate of correctness I would send it signed on paper, attached to a signed copy of the translation AND a signed copy of the source text.
In thay way you certify that the translation is correct according to the source text that was sent to you.
If you don´t attach a signed copy of the source text, the client might change it and if the translating no lonher is true to there copy of the source you will be blamed.
I hope I made myself understood.
Regards,
Marina


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RNAtranslator  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:59
English to Spanish
+ ...
I do agree with Tatty Marina and Astrid!!! Apr 3, 2008

It makes no sense that the final client ask that. The final client could ask such a certificate to the agency, not to the translator, as the final client has a deal *only* with the agency. I think that it's the agency who wants that certificate. Tatty explained it very well.

I would add something to the suggestion of Marina: sign (if you decide to do so) *every page* of both original and translation on one of its margins to avoid tampering.


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