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Certificate of translation correctness
Thread poster: Marisa Condurso de Nohara

Marisa Condurso de Nohara  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 19:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
Jun 21, 2008

I have been working for the same end client for many, many years. We had agreed that each time I deemed it necessary I would suggest the comany's Medical Advisers to "take a glance" at some terms for the sake of medical/pharmacological/chemical correctness, especially because all materials are shared by many Latin American subsidiaries. Now, they have to meet new Company's requirements (I suppose) so my main contact is asking me to send him "any kind" of certification to endorse the correctness of my translation of a large bilingüal site on a medical condition. In my country, Argentina, certificates for transaltors are issued by the College of Sworn/Public/Legal Translators, but these do not certify the correctness of the translation but that the translator is a proven professional.
I have never experienced this kind of request by any client at all, and before replying to my client, I would appreciate my colleagues' advise and "enlightment" about this subject:

1)Have you ever been asked for such a certificate? 2)Does any Argentine colleague know of any body that could certify my correctness? 3) Don't you think that, should I find this certification, I should also protect myself from any alledged mistake or lack of accuracy taking into account that Spanish varies within the Latin American world and particularly when dealing with medical/pharmaceutical terminology?

By Monday or so, I should be in a position to answer this request, either with a "what you are asking me does not exist" or "you will soon receive the requested certificate".

Finally, I understand that having my university diploma which certifies that I graduated as a translator and other diplomas certifying that I have taken various courses for translators on different fields of medicine, should be enough to endorse my expertise.

Please feel free to comment and thank you in advance.
McNohara


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Alexandra Goldburt
Local time: 15:17
English to Russian
+ ...
my experience Jun 21, 2008

I'm asked for the "accuracy certificate" with almost every translation I make. I attach the document that states the following:

"I, Alexandra Goldburt, certify and state the following:

That I am competent in Russian and English language, and

That [agency name] is an agent on my behalf, and

That the attached [document name] was translated by me from Russian to English and represents full and accurate translation of said document."

I then sign it, mention that I am a Certified Court Interpreter and give my certification number.

If it is my direct client, I skip the part that names the agency.

That's, basically, all. Maybe rules are different in Argentina - so, hopefully, somebody from your country answers your question.


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
Request is vague Jun 21, 2008

Your client is asking for "any kind" of certification to endorse the correctness of your translation, which is apparently already posted on the Internet. This is supposedly in response to either "new Company requirements" (same company) or a "new Company's requirements" (some other company that has stepped into the picture.

This request is too vague. Whichever the case may be, the client is certainly obligated to provide you with specifics on their request. The normal procedure for certifying translations merely involves citing your qualifications (education, professional certifications as a translator, etc.) and then swearing that the translation is accurate and complete.

So I think on Monday morning your response to the client should be: What exactly is it that you want? We as your colleagues or anyone else on the street cannot answer that; only the client can.


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RNAtranslator  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
Be carefull! Jun 22, 2008

Alexandra Goldburt wrote:

That the attached [document name] was translated by me from Russian to English and represents full and accurate translation of said document."


I suppose you sign all the pages of the source document and the ones of the target too; otherwise, you could be in a trouble.


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
Normal Practice Jun 22, 2008

My normal practice is to initial and stamp every page of the translation and every page of a copy of the original document. It is a lot of work, but it shows exactly what I did and exactly what I worked from if there is any question.

Fortunately there have never been any questions.


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Marisa Condurso de Nohara  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 19:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Endorse yourself? Jun 22, 2008

Alexandra Goldburt wrote:

"I, Alexandra Goldburt, certify and state the following:

That I am competent in Russian and English language, and......................


Alexandra, thank you for sharing your experience with me. I just wonder to which extend one can certify one's own competence. Anyway, your piece of text will certainly be the basis of my own "certification of accuracy", probably with some modifications adapted to my own point of view. This has nothing to do with Argentinean law and practice (at least as I understand my client's request), therefore I also hope that some colleague from my country can throw some light to this subject too. Thank you very, very much.
McNohara

[Editado a las 2008-06-22 21:23]

[Editado a las 2008-06-22 21:24]


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Marisa Condurso de Nohara  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 19:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
No hard copy Jun 22, 2008

RNAtranslator wrote:

I suppose you sign all the pages........


I work (and have been working this way for quite a long time) on soft-copy only, normally "copy-decks" for web sites. But your practice can be adapted to soft-copies too. Your warning helps me foresee potentially risky situations. Thanks a lot, again.


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Marisa Condurso de Nohara  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 19:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Will adapt your practice to mine Jun 22, 2008

Henry Hinds wrote:

My normal practice is to initial and stamp every page of the translation and every page of a copy of the original document..............


Thank you Henry! That's quite a good and normal practice when dealing with hard-copies. Anyway, as I wrote to ARNtranslator, this can be adapted to soft-copies, too, the way I am generally asked to send translations and receive assignments. Thank you for all the time you devoted to help me.


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RNAtranslator  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
How do you sign soft- copies? Jun 22, 2008

McNohara wrote:

RNAtranslator wrote:

I suppose you sign all the pages........


I work (and have been working this way for quite a long time) on soft-copy only, normally "copy-decks" for web sites. But your practice can be adapted to soft-copies too. Your warning helps me foresee potentially risky situations. Thanks a lot, again.


Would you please explain how do you singn a soft-copy? the only way I know to do that is signing it with PGP or GnuPG, the public key being signed by a trusted third party. Is this the way you do that?


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Claudia Alvis  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 17:17
Spanish
+ ...
Question Jun 23, 2008

RNAtranslator wrote:

Alexandra Goldburt wrote:

That the attached [document name] was translated by me from Russian to English and represents full and accurate translation of said document."


I suppose you sign all the pages of the source document and the ones of the target too; otherwise, you could be in a trouble.


Alexandra,

Can you elaborate? I do the same thing and I don't include a " certification of translation" on the copy of the original --let alone on the original; usually certifications have an ID number which is included in the translation anyway. What did you mean by what you said?


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Marisa Condurso de Nohara  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 19:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Certifications ID Jun 23, 2008

Claudia Alvis wrote:

Alexandra,

Can you elaborate? I do the same thing and I don't include a " certification of translation" on the copy of the original --let alone on the original; usually certifications have an ID number which is included in the translation anyway. What did you mean by what you said?


Claudia,

Your question to Alexandra poses a new question/doubt to me. What kind of certifications holding an ID number do you refer to? You might have noticed that I do not understand how it is that one can certify one's own accuracy as mentioned by Alexandra, and now, I see that you speak about an "ID", so... who issues that number [and the very certificate]? Is there a public or a private body in your country for such a purpose? As I said, in my country we have the College of Sworn [call it legal, public or whatever but not scientific-only, or technical-only] Translators which issues certifications of translators' signature, but that is far from being a certificate of accuracy. Could you tell me something more about it? It will be of great help. Thanks in advance,
McNohara


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Claudia Alvis  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 17:17
Spanish
+ ...
ID Jun 23, 2008

Hello McNohara,

I'm sorry I was not clear. By ID number, I meant the ID of the document, i.e. birth/marriage certificates are issued with a number on the document. In the United States there is no such public or private body that regulates or issues certified translations, so the ATA (I'm 99% sure it was ATA but I can't find it) published a sample of a "certificate of completeness and correctness" that can be issued and signed by the translator. Some agencies in the United States even required that "certificate" to be notarized.


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Marisa Condurso de Nohara  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 19:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
ATA's certification sample Jun 23, 2008

Claudia Alvis wrote:

Hello McNohara,

I'm sorry I was not clear. By ID number, I meant the ID of the document................................... In the United States there is no such public or private body ......................... so the ATA (I'm 99% sure it was ATA but I can't find it) published a sample of a "certificate of completeness and correctness" that can be issued and signed by the translator...............................


Your are elucidating the subject very much to me Claudia, so don't be sorry!
Now I understand what ID you are refering to and the practice is the same when turning here to the CTPBA (colegio de traductores públicos de Buenos Aires). But now that you mentioned the US, I am almost sure that my client's request might have originated from USA requirements.

So.... a new question (I regret bothering you so much!): Is ATA's sample of a"certificate of completeness and correctness" downloadable by ANY translator? Or should I be affiliated to ATA for the certificate to be valid? Will be awaiting your great help! TKS
McNohara


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Claudia Alvis  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 17:17
Spanish
+ ...
Links Jun 23, 2008

I couldn't find the page I was referring to (maybe it wasn't in atanet), but I found another one that briefly explains how things work:

20.9 Translation of Documents

All foreign language documents must be translated into English or they will not be accepted by the Asylum Office or the Court. Anybody but the applicant herself who can swear that she is competent in English and the foreign language can do the translation and sign the certificate of translation. There is no requirement that the translator have any professional training in translation; she must simply be able to certify in a notarized certificate that she is competent to render the translation.

There is no rule prohibiting the attorney of record form certifying translations. Whenever a foreign language document is being submitted the entire document must be translated, not just the relevant sections.

Every foreign language document must have its own certificate of translation attached. For each exhibit, you should attach, first the English version, then the foreign language version, then the certificate of translation.

An example of a typical translation certificate follows:

20.9.1 Sample One – Certification of Accurate Translation

I, Rita Garcia hereby certify that I translated the attached document from Spanish into English and that to the best of my ability it is a true and correct translation. I further certify that I am competent in both Spanish and English to render and certify such translation.


Rita Garcia


Sworn to before me this 7th day
of September 2005

_________________________________
Notary Public

» Practice pointer: Sometimes, if the applicant is fluent in English and his native language, you can ask the applicant to do the translations himself (since he may have more time to spend on this then staff in your office) and you can then have a third party who is fluent in both languages review the translation and submit a Certificate confirming that she has reviewed the translation and the translation is accurate.

An example follows:

20.9.2 Sample Two – Certification of Accurate Translation

I, Rita Garcia hereby certify that I reviewed the attached documents and that to the best of my ability I certify that the English translation of the Spanish document is true and accurate. I further certify that I am competent in both English and Spanish to render and certify such translation.


Rita Garcia


Sworn to before me this 23rd day
of September 2005


_________________________________
Notary Public

1 According to the Regulations, an applicant’s credible testimony, without corroboration, is considered sufficient tomeet the burden of proof. 8 C.F.R. 208.13(a). Also see In Re S-M-J, Int. Dec. 3303 (BIA 1997), In Re B, Int. Dec. 3251 (BIA 1995).

This Manual is intended to provide information to attorneys and accredited representatives. It is not intended as legal advice. Asylum seekers should speak with qualified attorneys before applying.


http://www.immigrationequality.org/manual_template.php?id=1052


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Marisa Condurso de Nohara  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 19:17
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Great samples - great help Jun 23, 2008

[quote]Claudia Alvis wrote:

I couldn't find the page I was referring to (maybe it wasn't in atanet), but I found another one that briefly explains how things work:

[quote]

Claudia,

You've been of great help, and the time you've devoted to me has no price. I profoundly thank you a lot. Hope I can be of any help for you at any time.
Warm regards,
McNohara


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