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myGengo's "State of the Translation Industry" Report is now available for download!
Thread poster: Gengo.com

Gengo.com  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 04:05
English to Japanese
+ ...
Oct 13, 2009

It's finally here!

We are pleased to announce the release of our "State of the Translation Industry 2009" Report! Please click here to go to the download page.

We also want to take this opportunity to thank everyone who participated in our surveys and posted comments on the discussion forums. Please feel free to leave suggestions and comments so that we can make improvements in the future - we would love to hear your feedback. We appreciate your time and ongoing support!

-myGengo


 

Tim Drayton  Identity Verified
Cyprus
Local time: 22:05
Turkish to English
+ ...
Thanks Oct 13, 2009

Interesting reading. Thanks for that.

 

Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:05
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Question to the authors regarding price statistics Oct 13, 2009

There is a pie-chart in this report with the title of
"What is your price for translations
(per word or character)?"

Could you please clarify how the data had been aggregated to include prices BOTH per word and per character in one single chart?

What multiplier did you use between the per-character and per-word rates?

Which prices did you ask from the translators? Based on source or target text count?

The reason I am asking is that if (God forbid) there was no conversion between per word and per character prices, and /or no standardization on source or target count, the numbers are hard to consider valid, even as estimates, or relative ratios, IMHO.

Thanks
Katalin

[Edited at 2009-10-13 14:42 GMT]


 

Marie-Hélène Hayles  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:05
Italian to English
+ ...
Word/character Oct 13, 2009

I did the same double-take as you, Katalin, but then I assumed that by character they mean character of Japanese/Chinese, rather than keystrokes of other alphabets. You'd be in a far better position than me to say if this interpretation makes sense - although confirmation or an explanation from the horse's mouth would be even better!

 

Silvina Dell'Isola Urdiales  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 21:05
Member (2003)
Italian to Spanish
+ ...
coudn't download the file Oct 13, 2009

Hi,

I subscribed to the site but I could'nt download the file....

Could anyone tell me why??


Thanks in advance

silvina


 

Hynek Palatin  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 21:05
English to Czech
+ ...
Download Oct 13, 2009

Silvina Dell'Isola Urdiales wrote:
I subscribed to the site but I could'nt download the file....


Silvina,

Just click the "Download Free Report" button.

[Upraveno: 2009-10-13 14:35 GMT]


 

Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:05
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Assumptions, assumptions... Oct 13, 2009

Hi Marie-Hélène,
There is no point in making assumptions. Statistical presentations should not assume the readers are making assumptions, and/or that they all make the same assumptions, and/or that those assumptions are the same as the assumptions used by the people created the charts, and/or that any assumptions are the correct ones (if there are such things, at all).
Even if they meant Japanese characters, it still does not change the question:
How were the per character prices consolidated with the per word prices?

For example, for the type of texts that I normally work with, for a translation from Japanese to English, a rate of $0.08 per source character would correspond to $0.21 per target word. If you just take the straight numbers (0.08 vs. 0.21) they would go into two very different slices on the piechart...

Hence the question.

Katalin


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:05
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Missing a critical figure Oct 13, 2009

Well, about expressions like "Only 54% of survey respondents never use machine translation (“MT”). Or put another way, 46% of respondents do."... It's so biased! I understand that you run a business which is or will be based on machine translation and that it makes sense for you to bias this and say that we professional translators love machine translation when a vast majority of us professional translators thinks machine translation is pretty useless for our work.

Can you please tell us what is the sample size of the survey whose results are depicted on page 20?

Also, are you seriously saying that there are more men than women in professional translation? My experience is completely the opposite!


 

Gengo.com  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 04:05
English to Japanese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
word / character prices Oct 13, 2009

Hi, sorry about pricing terminology confusion.

Marie-Hélène Hayles is correct; when we say 'character', we specifically mean the unit when referring to logographic languages. For the chart, word / character refers to the respective counting unit for one of either Arabic, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish (LatAm and Sp), and Russian.

The prices are for translating English into any of the above languages. For that specific pie-chart you're referring to, we were simply interested to see if any one price point stood out across languages.

[Edited at 2009-10-13 14:51 GMT]


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:05
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
What was the exact question about machine translation? Oct 13, 2009

Can you please post here what the exact question and options were for the survey? From the results I see a risk that the figures were cooked or the questions were misleading if you now say that 46% of translators use machine translation.

 

Gengo.com  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 04:05
English to Japanese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
quite the contrary... Oct 13, 2009

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

I understand that you run a business which is or will be based on machine translation and that it makes sense for you to bias this and say that we professional translators love machine translation when a vast majority of us professional translators thinks machine translation is pretty useless for our work.


If you had visited our service, you would realize we are quite literally the opposite. We're trying to do everything to keep humans in the pictureicon_smile.gif

Can you please tell us what is the sample size of the survey whose results are depicted on page 20?


As it says on page 8 of the report, sample size was 927.

Also, are you seriously saying that there are more men than women in professional translation? My experience is completely the opposite!


Tomás, it's a survey. Sometimes experiences fool us, sometimes they don't. That graph is there to put the responses in context. In other words, if the graph said 95% of the respondents were women, then you would read the rest of the graphs in a different light, right?


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:05
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Some striking comparisons Oct 13, 2009

myGengo wrote:
Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:
I understand that you run a business which is or will be based on machine translation and that it makes sense for you to bias this and say that we professional translators love machine translation when a vast majority of us professional translators thinks machine translation is pretty useless for our work.

If you had visited our service, you would realize we are quite literally the opposite. We're trying to do everything to keep humans in the pictureicon_smile.gif

My apologies then.

myGengo wrote:
As it says on page 8 of the report, sample size was 927.

Thanks a lot!

myGengo wrote:
Tomás wrote:Also, are you seriously saying that there are more men than women in professional translation? My experience is completely the opposite!

Tomás, it's a survey. Sometimes experiences fool us, sometimes they don't. That graph is there to put the responses in context. In other words, if the graph said 95% of the respondents were women, then you would read the rest of the graphs in a different light, right?

Indeed. It really strikes me that the basic demographics and also the number of years of experience are so different from that of the latest ATA survey (with a sample of also roughly 950 people). The ATA survey reveals that 65% of professional translators are women, and this matches my experience too.

Another interesting fact is the following (I am quoting from the ATA report):
ATA Certification Matters: Respondents who were ATA-certified earned a higher gross income in 2006 than those who were not ATA-certified. Using the full-time in-house private sector as an example, Figure 4 shows the impact ATA certification had on gross income. Those with ATA certification earned 35% more than their noncertified counterparts ($72,261 versus $53,632).

It is thus very surprising to see that your report focuses on the opposite to give the message: "certification is useless" and that it only creates personal satisfaction and nothing else. Can you explain this?


 

Charlie Bavington  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:05
French to English
Er.... Oct 13, 2009

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

Also, are you seriously saying that there are more men than women in professional translation? My experience is completely the opposite!


...I may be a Bear of Very Little Brain, but what I think they're saying is that more men answered the survey than women. It was a self-selecting survey, and they should always be handled with extreme caution and the results should never be extrapolated to be indicative of the entire population (see also: rates surveys, no matter who runs them).

Take it for what it is - an indication of what 900 or so people, who had the time and inclination to answer a survey, think. Not useless, but not the Holy Bible either.


 

Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:05
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Answer is not clear, still Oct 13, 2009

myGengo wrote:
Hi, sorry about pricing terminology confusion.

Marie-Hélène Hayles is correct; when we say 'character', we specifically mean the unit when referring to logographic languages. For the chart, word / character refers to the respective counting unit for one of either Arabic, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish (LatAm and Sp), and Russian.

The prices are for translating English into any of the above languages. For that specific pie-chart you're referring to, we were simply interested to see if any one price point stood out across languages.

[Edited at 2009-10-13 14:51 GMT]


OK, you say
the pricing chart is based on translations done from English into Arabic, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish (LatAm and Sp), and Russian.


(I don't understand what you mean by translating from English to English, but that is probably just a typo in the list, and besides the point.)

There are still questions:
What were the prices based on, source or target count?

If you asked the translators to provide their prices based on source count (English, as you said), than they should be all per-word rates, right?

If you asked the translators to provide their prices based on target count, then you would have a mix, as French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Russian normally can be counted as "words", while Chinese, Japanese and Korean can not, only by characters. (I am not sure about Arabic.)

So, I guess you asked the translators to provide their prices based on target count, as you do have a mix. Could you confirm that this was the case?

You also said:
For that specific pie-chart you're referring to, we were simply interested to see if any one price point stood out across languages.


This brings up the next question (this is actually the 3rd time I am asking this):
When you had these prices with different units (per-word and per-character), how did you consolidate them? Did you convert the per-character prices to per-word prices (obviously using the appropriate multiplier for each language pair), or the other way around? You obviously had to do something if you wanted to make any observation regarding anything standing out?...

Katalin

[Edited at 2009-10-13 15:18 GMT]


 

Gengo.com  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 04:05
English to Japanese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
ATA is as ATA does Oct 13, 2009

Hi Tomás,

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

Another interesting fact is the following (I am quoting from the ATA report):
ATA Certification Matters: Respondents who were ATA-certified earned a higher gross income in 2006 than those who were not ATA-certified. Using the full-time in-house private sector as an example, Figure 4 shows the impact ATA certification had on gross income. Those with ATA certification earned 35% more than their noncertified counterparts ($72,261 versus $53,632).


It is thus very surprising to see that your report focuses on the opposite to give the message: "certification is useless" and that it only creates personal satisfaction and nothing else. Can you explain this?


Does it really surprise you that a report published by the ATA would "discover" that "ATA Certification Matters"? Are those earnings values causal or correlative?icon_smile.gif

As Charlie Bavington says,

Take it for what it is - an indication of what 900 or so people, who had the time and inclination to answer a survey, think. Not useless, but not the Holy Bible either.


 
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