Company Glossaries
Thread poster: Annett Hieber

Annett Hieber  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 17:59
English to German
Dec 6, 2009

As I have currently some new customers for whom I work regularly and also try to establish some more new business relationships, I would like to ask you the following question(s):

Normally, I start to create a new glossary when working for a customer (for Trados purposes mainly). Now, I also offer to customers to create an individual company glossary for their own use which I then would update regularly.

Would you charge them this extra service separately, or is it some extra service free of charge for them?

How do you normally proceed?

Thank you in advance for your participation in this discussion!

Annett


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KSL Berlin  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 16:59
Member (2003)
German to English
+ ...
Several approaches Dec 6, 2009

Annett Hieber wrote:
Normally, I start to create a new glossary when working for a customer (for Trados purposes mainly). Now, I also offer to customers to create an individual company glossary for their own use which I then would update regularly.

Would you charge them this extra service separately, or is it some extra service free of charge for them?


My approach for this sort of thing varies depending on what resources the customer has and what the relationship and project goals are like.

If the new customer has an appreciation of the value of standardized corporate terminology for translation and communication (not the majority), a terminology project might be planned before any major translation work. This might include:
(1) Statistical surveys of term frequency in different text categories (marketing literature, user manuals, corporate contracts) based on existing materials
(2) If #1 has a significant number of translated documents of acceptable quality available, alignment of these resources for concordance reference. The TM resources can be made available in easy reference formats such as Excel if non-translators have a use for such context-oriented bilingual references.
(3) Creation of a reference glossary for review and approval by the client. This is usually delivered in PDF or RTF format for use by people who do not use TEnTs. The format in which I maintain these data is usually a termbase for one of my CAT tools. Although I don't generally like to work with Trados much because it is not efficient for routine translation, I often use MultiTerm for maintaining the master termbases, because I have adapted the export templates to suit my purposes and this tool gives me better options for dictionary-style term maintenance than my preferred TEnTs (MemoQ and DVX). However, less complex terminologies are often maintained in something like the DVX Lexicon or a small termbase and exported periodically to Excel or MS Word tables for review and approval.

The work is charged by the hour. I've done this often enough that I can generally give the client a reliable estimate of cost per extracted term or conversely, if the budget will cover 3 hours of work I can give a ballpark estimate of how many high priority terms will be extracted. Working with strict budget restrictions, of course I will not invest huge amounts of time researching obscure but frequent terms. I'll take note of them and talk to the customer before burning 3 hours on a word.

A big project is usually a good opportunity to sell such work, especially if the project will involve multiple translators and there is a need for consistency.

(4) After the initial glossary approval, additions are made in the course of the work and submitted as updates at reasonable interviews for review. Sometimes I charge for this, usually I consider it part of an ongoing project and don't worry about it. It really depends on what the customers needs and expectations are. If the terminology will be used by other translators, I am inclined to charge.

The alternative is to provide a more limited list without charge, which I compile in the course of the work. I think of this more as an aid for reviewing a translation than anything else. There is no pretense of the terms being comprehensive or even generally useful. Sometimes the list may contain mostly terms for which there may be internal terms not provided to me, where I want to draw attention to them in some way in case an editor might want to change them. Sometimes these lists are followed by requests to expand and maintain them formally in later projects, and charges for such activities are planned.

In your case, I suppose you could distinguish between (A) a separately developed corporate glossary based on specified corpora and possibly maintained according to whatever agreement you make and (B) terminology resources that develop with projects and are perhaps provided for a charge in formats which are particularly useful to the client. (For clients using TEnT resources internally, this might also include corresponding termbase files.) Whatever approach you take, it will be very useful for you to invest a few hours in creating an attractive example for marketing purposes. This can be sent along with your proposal, perhaps with a quick raw statistical list of the 300 most frequent terms generated with a freeware tool that has stopword lists like AntConc or something similar, so that the customer can get a clear vision of what the deliverable would be like.


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Pablo Bouvier  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:59
German to Spanish
+ ...
Company Glossaries Dec 6, 2009

Annett Hieber wrote:

As I have currently some new customers for whom I work regularly and also try to establish some more new business relationships, I would like to ask you the following question(s):

Normally, I start to create a new glossary when working for a customer (for Trados purposes mainly). Now, I also offer to customers to create an individual company glossary for their own use which I then would update regularly.

Would you charge them this extra service separately, or is it some extra service free of charge for them?

How do you normally proceed?

Thank you in advance for your participation in this discussion!

Annett


Time is money and if you spend time creating glossaries you should cash for the time you have invested to create them. A second thing that has to be taken in account: Glossaries complexity. It is not the same to create a general purpose glossary as a very high technical one...

Nevertheless, in some cases of very good clients I would consider giving some glossary away as an investment, but stating clearly to the client that this is a a punctual gift.



[Editado a las 2009-12-07 00:37 GMT]


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