How do you go about educating your clients?
Thread poster: hyperlingo.com

hyperlingo.com
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:00
Feb 4, 2010

Hi all,

In my experience, a lot of clients are not fully aware of the variety of services that language professionals supply - translating, proofreading, editing, polishing, etc., etc., and tend to lump everything together under the generic term, translation.

This can result in clients expecting services which they have not really paid for, and translators being asked to do extra work - research, etc., which they did not initially agree to.

How do you educate your clients about the services you provide? Is it feasible to just tell them when you/they initiate contact, or do you have other methods?

Looking forward to your replies!

Guy


Direct link Reply with quote
 

DZiW
Ukraine
English to Russian
+ ...
not so simple Feb 4, 2010

Hi!

Indeed, the topic is quite ambiguous: should a seller really explain the whole process and procedures regarding a good to all his clients? Do the clients really know what they want?

As for me, I tell my *new* clients that there's no such things as a bad translation, but different degrees of QA)

As a rule it goes like this:
Pay method and terms? If irrelevant then full stop. Language pair? Field? Audience? Type of source document and translation? How big? When? QA? If it's feasible then is *this* price ok? If not then what can be changed scot-free?
Also if there're any additional requirements and questions then it will cost extra.

Frankly speaking, I can't see how and why you are going to 'educate' clients, but I can't go without the answers to questions above; also I confirm acceptance *only* after having looked at the sample (a few pages): I think I can never forget that 'pure' ms word doc with tiff instead of text with handwriting. All other questions are solved as we (my client and I) go.

Cheers)


Direct link Reply with quote
 

hyperlingo.com
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:00
TOPIC STARTER
Interesting Feb 5, 2010

Hi DZiW,

You're right, the question was a little ambiguous. What I was trying to say is that the range of services that translators provide can often be quite broad, and these different services require different amounts of time and effort. For example, proofreading a well-translated document could be relatively quick, whereas editing a technical document could require research and specialist training in the subject. Some translators may have their work proofread by a third party, whereas some may not. It seems to me that clients may often be unaware that this range of services even exists, and may have preconceived notions of what the service they are paying for consists of.

When I've talked to translators, many have said they feel it can be beneficial to talk to their clients 'educating' them on the different services they can provide, so that clients understand the options available to them and don't have expectations that are too high, or indeed too low.

What do you think?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

DZiW
Ukraine
English to Russian
+ ...
learning the basics Feb 5, 2010

Ok. I see two points here - (1) very few translators want their client to know what's really going on. No, I mean it! It's like a joke about a motor mechanic and a blond girl riding a new sport car: 'So, you wanna me to check your car?.. Ok, you're lucky to come here because I've fixed a couple of very serious things for a song, ya know... Well, $1'723,98 please'.

The point (2) is a client has a job to do and he *just* want it done - he doesn't really care how it's done because he *just* gives the order and so it should be done! At least very many of them do think so) Furthermore- many of them were also told to do that very job without any relevant specific information! Not as funny as it may seem.

I'm not sure about individual translators and freelancers, but more and more translation agencies and companies (especially ISO-related) ask to fill in a form including a document and make questions about critical points only. IMO it's quite educative)


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Pablo Bouvier  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:00
German to Spanish
+ ...
How do you go about educating your clients? Feb 5, 2010

hyperlingo.com wrote:

Hi all,

In my experience, a lot of clients are not fully aware of the variety of services that language professionals supply - translating, proofreading, editing, polishing, etc., etc., and tend to lump everything together under the generic term, translation.

This can result in clients expecting services which they have not really paid for, and translators being asked to do extra work - research, etc., which they did not initially agree to.

How do you educate your clients about the services you provide? Is it feasible to just tell them when you/they initiate contact, or do you have other methods?

Looking forward to your replies!

Guy


I have given up to educate clients. It is an expensive task and I am not used to lose my time. If they accept my rules, OK. If not, they should look for another translator or agency. But, I explain also very clearly wich services (and of course, wich not) I am offering them at the first contact.

[Editado a las 2010-02-06 18:37 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Sergei Tumanov  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:00
English to Russian
+ ...
a little tweak Feb 5, 2010

Pablo Bouvier wrote:
… If they accept my rules, OK. If not, they should look for another translator …


I would say 'rates', not rules.

[Edited at 2010-02-05 22:25 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Pablo Bouvier  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:00
German to Spanish
+ ...
How do you go about educating your clients? Feb 6, 2010

Sergei Tumanov wrote:

Pablo Bouvier wrote:
… If they accept my rules, OK. If not, they should look for another translator …


I would say 'rates', not rules.

[Edited at 2010-02-05 22:25 GMT]


Yes, this too. But, they should also accept my rules: Signing a contract for bigger jobs, accept a reasonable delivery time (unless we have agreed other terms as urgency, rough translation, etc.), establish who should realize the terminological investigation or if they provide already translated documents or memories as reference (if they provide, I agree a discount as they are saving me a lot of searching time), to specify a responsible contact person in the clients company for this job and so far.

Problems, at least in my experience,usually do not proceed from the price, once the job limits and his price have been clearly stated and agreed.

[Editado a las 2010-02-06 19:06 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

How do you go about educating your clients?

Advanced search







Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »
SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2017 helps translators increase translation productivity whilst ensuring quality. Combining translation memory, terminology management and machine translation in one simple and easy-to-use environment.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search