Sworn translation goes abroad, and...?
Thread poster: Iza Szczypka

Iza Szczypka  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 06:55
English to Polish
+ ...
Feb 10, 2010

In Poland, the status of sworn translators is legally regulated, just like it is in Portugal, Brazil etc. When I prepare a translation for the domestic market, it's all nice and clear and everybody knows where we stand. When I am hired by the Polish judiciary / police / public prosecutor to prepare a translation to be used abroad, everything is still clear.
BUT... what happens to my official capacity if I am hired by an individual who then presents my translation abroad? Obviously, my declaration of accuracy and my signature are still there, but does it matter if I declare myself to be a sworn translator in Poland, or just a linguist? I don't mean the attitude of my customer (whose way of thinking follows the lines of domestic regulations and who requires a sworn translation), but the attitude of the institution being presented with my translation, i.e. the level of document recognition which my customer intends to achieve. Does it make any difference (to the authority in receipt of the translation) who certifies a translation, as long as it is a linguist?
Consequently, do I indeed act as a sworn translator in such a situation? Or just as a linguist, holding a relevant degree? After all, I have no sworn translator status in the receiving country, whose legal system more often than not does not provide for such a status at all.
As in my case a translation into English may only be involved, my question is directed primarily at the colleagues from countries where English-language translations may be officially presented - not only UK / US / Australia, but also Scandinavia etc. - still, all other comments are also welcome.icon_smile.gif


 

Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 05:55
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
Don't you have to be "recognised"? Feb 10, 2010

I'm not a sworn translator but I know that when I left the UK to come to live in France I had to get various documents translated for the benefit of the French authorities (birth and marriage certificates for buying a house, etc). I had to have the texts translated by a translator who was registered with the French Consulate in England. If I had been going to French-speaking Belgium, I imagine this would have been worthless.

I believe that now I'm here in France, I can go to any translator registered with a court here in France for my official translations into French, but I don't seem to be able to go back to the ones in the UK - they say they can't help me now as they only deal with British residents. Bizarre - the job is the same, after all.


 

Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:55
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Regulations of the target country Feb 10, 2010

I believe the regulations of the target country apply. In other words, if a US authority requires a certified+notarized translation, that has to be done locally. The only other alternative I saw was in some cases the Embassy or Consulate would re-certify the document that was translated in the other jurisdiction.
So, I don't think it matters whether you certify the translation one way or other, it may need to be redone or re-certified once it is in the target country. The client has to figure out what the requirements are based on where he/she has to submit the translation and for what purpose.
Katalin


 

Magdalena Szewciów  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 06:55
Member (2008)
English to Polish
+ ...
well Feb 10, 2010

Poland is the best example of what you said Katalin.
Iza, have you ever been asked to re-certify a certified+notarised translation EN>PL from the USA or Ireland because no red tape would let it through?icon_wink.gif I have, several times in fact.


 

Iza Szczypka  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 06:55
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
All your responses so far seem to confirm my gut feeling Feb 10, 2010

... which tells me that my accreditation is for Poland only, i.e. local - the same way a French translator's certification is recognized in France, but the same translation cannot be certified by a British resident unless s/he is listed by an embassy/consulate of the target country.

@ Magda - yes, just once, and on that occasion I couldn't understand how to do it correctly. To me, it was already certified, but the red tape thought otherwise.icon_razz.gif


 

liviu roth
United States
Local time: 00:55
Romanian to English
+ ...
use the apostille Feb 10, 2010

Certain translated official documents should be valid with the apostille (Hague Convention) , unless you deal with an uninformed clerk.

 

vovan
United States
Local time: 21:55
Russian to English
+ ...
Sworn translation goes abroad, and...?" Feb 11, 2010

The regulations of the target country apply and if requires notarized translation, that has to be done locally. It has nothing to do with "certified".
I think it may need to be resworn in the target country by the holder/client.


 


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