ProZ.com Freelancer Success Summit

Join ProZ.com/TV for a FREE online event April 7-9th! Empowering Freelance Translators & Interpreters to achieve their business objectives and reach their full potential 30+ hours of content, Live Q&A, Virtual Powwows, Access to Free Training, giveaways & more. Join 1,000's of linguists from around the globe at the ProZ.com/TV Freelancer Success Summit

Click for Full Participation
PROZ.COM COVID-19 RESOURCE CENTER
Access Covid-19 jobs, answer relevant terminology questions, read industry news and more.

Pages in topic:   < [1 2]
Difficult period for translators
Thread poster: Vincenzo Di Maso

dkalinic
Local time: 18:20
Croatian to German
+ ...
In memoriam
overworked and overburdened Oct 18, 2011

I can only confirm Roy's experience. In my language pair DE, EN -> SI, HR I have more work than usual and it seems to be amassing every day. As the situation in Croatia is, there aren't enough professional and high-quality translators to cover the field.

Regards,
Davor


 

Claudio LR
Local time: 18:20
Member (2007)
English to Italian
+ ...
I would not generalize, not even for Italian... Oct 19, 2011

I think the international market of translation is too fragmented to try to detect a general trend, even just for a language. Of course the economic situation has an impact. You do not need to be a translator in economics and finance to know that between the end of 2008 and 2009 there was a world-wide recession. And that now, after a recovery, we are in stagnation in many countries with a non negligible risk of a double dip (however many companies, which are directly or indirectly our clients, a... See more
I think the international market of translation is too fragmented to try to detect a general trend, even just for a language. Of course the economic situation has an impact. You do not need to be a translator in economics and finance to know that between the end of 2008 and 2009 there was a world-wide recession. And that now, after a recovery, we are in stagnation in many countries with a non negligible risk of a double dip (however many companies, which are directly or indirectly our clients, are stronger now than in 2008/09 as they have cut costs, including translators’ rates in some cases, so are better prepared for another recession). Yet, remember that a translator, unlike a company with employees etc. (such as a translation agency for instance) has a limited capacity and can still be constantly booked out even during recessions, and even if their rates are above average and they translate into languages such as Italian... I think it all depends on the solidity of your portfolio of clients (which doesn't mean having tons of clients, you can have only a few but very strong clients and have strong relationships with them). Of course, for those who are starting now or bid in sites such as proz.com it can get harder as, in difficult times, more and more people (and even dogs, as Angie put it ) try to enter the translation market, as there is no barrier to entry, with as only weapon their low price…Collapse


 

Vincenzo Di Maso  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 17:20
Member (2009)
English to Italian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
customers Oct 19, 2011

With regards to long-standing customers, I've to say that I have lost 3 of them in the last 3 months.
Try to guess why? Rate matters!


 

Claudio LR
Local time: 18:20
Member (2007)
English to Italian
+ ...
My suggestion... Oct 19, 2011

Vincenzo Di Maso wrote:

With regards to long-standing customers, I've to say that I have lost 3 of them in the last 3 months.
Try to guess why? Rate matters!


I think your courage (to turn down a client instead of lowering your rate) will pay in the long run. Meanwhile my personal suggestion (and without knowing your personal situation) is that you devote the additional time you have to strengthening one of your specialisations, in order to be able to impress the (relative rare) clients who seek quality before price, when the occasion presents itself.


 

sailingshoes
Local time: 18:20
Spanish to English
I think you're right Oct 19, 2011

Ciao Vicenzo,

I live and work in Italy (IT-EN/SP-EN/CAT-EN) and would say that you're right. Things are quieter and I agree with what Lisa says (which sounds like a Lou Reed song). I have an OK stream of work and my YTD figures are much better than 2010 and 2009. But looking at this year alone, the summer seems to mark a watershed. Most of my Italian work is now coming from non-Italian agencies and the number of clients has dropped.

I did a test last night and looked a
... See more
Ciao Vicenzo,

I live and work in Italy (IT-EN/SP-EN/CAT-EN) and would say that you're right. Things are quieter and I agree with what Lisa says (which sounds like a Lou Reed song). I have an OK stream of work and my YTD figures are much better than 2010 and 2009. But looking at this year alone, the summer seems to mark a watershed. Most of my Italian work is now coming from non-Italian agencies and the number of clients has dropped.

I did a test last night and looked at my email pages to see frequency of contacts (i.e. how many days of work-related mails there were on each page/ how many pages in each week or month of work-related mails). The frequency seems to have dropped by about 15%, maybe 20%. The change dates almost exactly from the leap in the Bund spread!

On the other hand, this may be an across-the-board trend in demand. As an Italian consumer, I'm buying nothing. I'm assuming we're headed for some kind of meltdown. I find it's a kind of reverse retail therapy: the less I buy, the better I feel!

Coraggio!
Collapse


 

Laurent KRAULAND (X)  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 18:20
French to German
+ ...
Exactly Oct 19, 2011

Claudio LR wrote:

Vincenzo Di Maso wrote:

With regards to long-standing customers, I've to say that I have lost 3 of them in the last 3 months.
Try to guess why? Rate matters!


I think your courage (to turn down a client instead of lowering your rate) will pay in the long run. Meanwhile my personal suggestion (and without knowing your personal situation) is that you devote the additional time you have to strengthening one of your specialisations, in order to be able to impress the (relative rare) clients who seek quality before price, when the occasion presents itself.


I am following some discussions on a social networking site and am surprised when I read the affirmations of some colleagues there.

As an example, I have yet to meet a genuine customer who would contemplate getting a translation of inferior quality ('good enough' or 'gist' translation) because they could not afford to pay more than the "standard" € 0.05 to € 0.07 per word.

Up to this day, all my customers have asked for native-language, quality translations independently from the rate they were willing or able to 'offer'.

It is only that I have decided there was no reason to start working below a certain level. Maybe I am getting less jobs, but these are jobs worth being done. And generally they are paid within the deadline and without a reminder.



[Edited at 2011-10-19 17:23 GMT]


 
Pages in topic:   < [1 2]


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Difficult period for translators

Advanced search







CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »
SDL Trados Business Manager Lite
Create customer quotes and invoices from within SDL Trados Studio

SDL Trados Business Manager Lite helps to simplify and speed up some of the daily tasks, such as invoicing and reporting, associated with running your freelance translation business.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search