Travel costs
Thread poster: dedasilva

dedasilva
United States
Local time: 17:45
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Jul 4, 2012

I have been asked to work on an interpreting project that will require some travelling. The project is a 2.5 months long, 8 hours/day, and it is about 97 miles from where I live. What should I charge as far as traveling goes? Thanks

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Phil Hand  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 05:45
Chinese to English
Reimbursement for actual expenses; 1/2 for travel days Jul 4, 2012

That's what I was getting on a recent long-term project. I'd usually travel on a Sunday afternoon, and get paid 1/2 my normal rate for the Sunday, then I'd fly home on the Friday night. I stayed at rather less posh hotels than my client did, but that was more out of choice than necessity.

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Alex Lago  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 23:45
Member (2009)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Hourly fee Jul 4, 2012

I would consider it working time, figure out how long it will take to get there and back each day (I would say 3/4 hours depending on the time of day probably), say 4 to call it safe.

So that means you will really be working 12 hours a day, however this might put some people person off (depends if they are willing to pay for travel time), so another option is to increase your hourly rate to cover this, i.e. = 12 hours x $100 = 1200 = 8 hours x $150


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Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:45
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
How will you be travelling? Jul 4, 2012

I'm not an interpreter and I've never travelled as part of my freelance job apart from to clients' places to teach, and that's always handled a little differently. Take anything I say with a large pinch of salt.

I would say that if you could do work or leisure things whilst travelling (and the work wasn't required for the current job), then you shouldn't be charging all the time t the client. If you're flying and you have hours waiting, then you could be using your laptop to work or play; same with the train. But if you're driving, you can't really do anything else - maybe listen to music, maybe study a language from CDs or something, but not much else. That would seem to be more a candidate for charging 100% of the time.

I hope it's an interesting and profitable job - you aren't going to be doing much else for a while!

Sheila


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Diana Coada  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:45
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Sorry. No. Jul 4, 2012

Sheila Wilson wrote:

I would say that if you could do work or leisure things whilst travelling (and the work wasn't required for the current job), then you shouldn't be charging all the time t the client. If you're flying and you have hours waiting, then you could be using your laptop to work or play; same with the train.

Sheila



Travel time is travel time and it should be charged.


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dedasilva
United States
Local time: 17:45
English to Portuguese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
hotel? Jul 4, 2012

Phil Hand wrote:

I stayed at rather less posh hotels than my client did, but that was more out of choice than necessity.



Did your client pay for your hotel?


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Diana Coada  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:45
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Accommodation costs are the client's responsibility Jul 4, 2012

dedasilva wrote:

Did your client pay for your hotel?


Or better yet: they're yours (as long as the client agrees with your arrangements) but the client foots the bill.


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Phil Hand  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 05:45
Chinese to English
Of course! Jul 4, 2012

If it's too far for a daily commute, your client must pay to put you up. All of an interpreter's travel gets paid for, either with a mileage allowance, reimbursement of tickets, hotel rooms... A lot of interpreting situations involve someone traveling (edit - I mean the client traveling to a foreign country, hence the need for interpreting), so if you can't work from home, the easiest thing is just for you to stay with the client.
Edit - I mean, assuming the client is staying in a hotel, you stay in the same hotel. Don't have to, but it's often easiest.

[Edited at 2012-07-04 16:43 GMT]


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LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:45
Russian to English
+ ...
Some courts in the US pay $.31/mile Jul 4, 2012

Some courts in the US pay $0.31 per mile if the interpreter residers more than 30 miles away from the courthouse. Agencies usually pay $20/hr for traveling time.

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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:45
English to Spanish
+ ...
Hotel Jul 5, 2012

You don't mention it, but I hope you are not thinking of almost 200 miles of commuting per day plus working 8 hours, are you? You'll never make it. Stay in a hotel 5 days a week and just go home on the weekends, both at your client's expense.

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