"Spamarrest" when replying to a request sent via ProZ.com
Thread poster: Nicole Schnell

Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:33
English to German
+ ...
Aug 25, 2013

Dear colleagues,

I just answered a job offer from a Canadian consulting company that also offers translation services for their consulting products. According to the email, I was recommended by a Canadian translation agency that I am working with, and the email was sent directly to me via ProZ.com.


I received an automated reply with the following message:

"Thank you very much for your e-mail.

We at XXXXXX are protecting ourselves from receiving junk mail. Since this is your first message to us, we are asking you to verify yourself.

Please click the link below to complete the verification process.
You have to do this only once.

http://www.spamarrest.com/aXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

You are receiving this message in response to your email to XXXXXXX, a Spam Arrest customer.

Spam Arrest requests that senders verify themselves before their email is delivered.

When you click the above link, you will be taken to a page with a graphic on it. Simply read the word in the graphic, type it into the form, accept the Sender Agreement, and you're verified.

You have to do this only once per Spam Arrest customer."


Is this normal? Hmmpf.

Our email and internet services are provided by Comcast (largest cable company in the US, we have a business account with them).

Has this ever happened to you? I am hesitant to verify my contact information at this "spamarrest.com" thing.

???


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Yasutomo Kanazawa  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:33
English to Japanese
+ ...
Very rare Aug 25, 2013

Nicole Schnell wrote:

Dear colleagues,

I just answered a job offer from a Canadian consulting company that also offers translation services for their consulting products. According to the email, I was recommended by a Canadian translation agency that I am working with, and the email was sent directly to me via ProZ.com.


I received an automated reply with the following message:

"Thank you very much for your e-mail.

We at XXXXXX are protecting ourselves from receiving junk mail. Since this is your first message to us, we are asking you to verify yourself.

Please click the link below to complete the verification process.
You have to do this only once.

http://www.spamarrest.com/aXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

You are receiving this message in response to your email to XXXXXXX, a Spam Arrest customer.

Spam Arrest requests that senders verify themselves before their email is delivered.

When you click the above link, you will be taken to a page with a graphic on it. Simply read the word in the graphic, type it into the form, accept the Sender Agreement, and you're verified.

You have to do this only once per Spam Arrest customer."


Is this normal? Hmmpf.

Our email and internet services are provided by Comcast (largest cable company in the US, we have a business account with them).

Has this ever happened to you? I am hesitant to verify my contact information at this "spamarrest.com" thing.

???


Hello Nicole,

This happened to me once or twice, but I should say this is a very rare thing (at least to me). I wasn't very hesitant to verify my contact info, but what bothered me more was that I had to take an extra step to get verified by this client. I felt like I wasn't trusted at all (I know, it's just procedures, and maybe I'm overreacting).

And the universal rule applied here too, that I did verify myself with this spamarrest thing, but I haven't received any jobs from this particular outsourcer (the universal rule where more paperwork and verifications, the less chance of getting work from such parties).


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Shai Navé  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 02:33
Member
English to Hebrew
+ ...
Not uncommon, but seem a little inappropriate in context Aug 25, 2013

These types of systems are well known methods to fight spam, so their legitimacy should not be a major concern.

That's said, I have two issues with them:
1) From my experience with one of these systems, after "white-listing" your email address you may start receiving marketing communications from them (the anti-spam service provider, not the customer who uses their service), which for all intents and purposes I consider to be spam. This is quite ironic given the nature of this service.
2) Personally I don't find them appropriate in this context. I can understand them being used for publicly available, customer service/general social media type of account, but far less appropriate when used in a B2B model. Makes me wonder why they suspect that they will receive unusual amount of Spam to an email address that is used to communicate with (potential) business partners.

It also makes me wonder if their Sales account uses the same anti-spam methods, and personally I usually don't like to volunteerly register my main/business contact details in a database of a third-party commercial (=for-profit organization) service provider who can later attempt to make profit of of them, but that is besides the point.

[Edited at 2013-08-25 06:26 GMT]


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Natalie  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 01:33
Member (2002)
English to Russian
+ ...

MODERATOR
Hi Nicole Aug 25, 2013

Nicole Schnell wrote:
Is this normal? Hmmpf.


It is normal as long as tons of spam are being sent by email: people use various options to get themselves protected. Spam Arrest is just one of such options.


Our email and internet services are provided by Comcast (largest cable company in the US, we have a business account with them).


So what? Your account can be hijacked and used for sending spam, exactly like practically any other email address.


Has this ever happened to you? I am hesitant to verify my contact information at this "spamarrest.com" thing.

???


Yes, it has happened to me a few times (three or perhaps four, no more than that). There is nothing wrong with clicking the provided "spamarrest" link: the only thing it actually does, is confirming that the sender is a live person and not an automated spam sender. This is something like an email version of CAPTCHA codes, no more than that.

Natalia
P.S. Forgot to add that the "when replying to a request sent via ProZ.com" part of of your question is a bit misleading: ProZ.com has nothing to do with this.

[Edited at 2013-08-25 09:04 GMT]


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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:33
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
@Natalie Aug 25, 2013

Natalie wrote:
Forgot to add that the "when replying to a request sent via ProZ.com" part of of your question is a bit misleading: ProZ.com has nothing to do with this.


When I write that the message was received via ProZ.com, and the message reads as follows:

"-----------
You have been sent a message via ProZ.com.
Author: XXXX [NOTE: The author is not a registered ProZ.com user or was not logged in when sending this message.]
Author's IP address: XX.XX.XX.XXX
Message type: Job-related
-----------

Dear Nicole,

You have been recommended to me by my friend and colleague
XXXXXX XXXXXXXX.

We are a XXXXXXX-based translation and localization
company and consultancy.
We have a medium-sized translation job to assign, roughly
X,XXXX new words and a few fuzzies...."


...then my "when replying to a request sent via ProZ.com" part of my question is hardly misleading.





Edited: Natalie, not Natalia. Sorry.

[Edited at 2013-08-25 09:17 GMT]


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Natalie  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 01:33
Member (2002)
English to Russian
+ ...

MODERATOR
It does not matter what is your address Aug 25, 2013

Nicole, it really does not matter where do you send your message from: in your case it was via ProZ.com, in my case it was my home ISP and in another case the ISP at my work (completely different). The spamarrest is set up in a way that it requests sender's confirmation for any message sent for the first time.

Natalia
P.S. They really could not setup their "spamarrest" beforehand as when somebody sends you a message through your ProZ.com profile they don't know the email address from which you will be answering



[Edited at 2013-08-25 10:55 GMT]


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Walter Landesman  Identity Verified
Uruguay
Local time: 20:33
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Legit Aug 25, 2013

I also got it 2-3 times. Nothing odd about it. Just copy some Captcha text to "confirm you are human".

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James McVay  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:33
Russian to English
+ ...
Might be okay, but Aug 25, 2013

I'm always reluctant to click on a link in any email i receive from a sender I don't know. That's a good way to get malware.

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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:33
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for your views on this issue! Aug 27, 2013

I did not click on this link, for reasons as outlined by colleagues in their above posts, and it turned out that the client received my email anyway. It also turned out that the client wasn't even aware of this odd procedure and delay which is not very customer-friendly.

Thanks all!


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