Crowdsourcing airplane manufacturing
Thread poster: Eleftherios Kritikakis

Eleftherios Kritikakis  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:25
Member (2003)
Greek to English
+ ...
Apr 12, 2014

Seeking people to work on anonymous crowdsourcing airplane manufacturing.

Engineers (professionals, part-time, whatever) will be chained to a desk 24/7 looking at a screen.
All of a sudden, they will receive a job notification, they will open it and chose whatever part of the airplane they want to construct ("2/3 of the tail and half of the left engine").

The least experienced, will be assigned with quality control.
Engineers may apply for positions by completing a brief test on "design passenger pillows".
To ensure consistency, all flat parts will be called "wings". This way it's easier for quality control.

When all parts are completed, the blueprints will be delivered to happy airline companies. Engineers will be paid at about the rate modern countries pay for unemployment, but they will be taxed as corporations. No insurance or vacation offered. Middle-men bonuses will be about the same with the engineer's pay (to ensure equality).

Apply now.


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Sergei Tumanov  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:25
English to Russian
+ ...
Why don't we visit Apr 13, 2014

a forum of engineers for such a specialised task??

I start wondering about flying planes now... if they are designed in a crowdsourcing way...

[Edited at 2014-04-13 08:08 GMT]


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DLyons  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 13:25
Spanish to English
+ ...
So the flat seats will also be wings. Apr 13, 2014

This has the additional benefit that we can cut down on fuel costs by asking the passengers to push. And can immediately lighten the load in any emergency.

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Eleftherios Kritikakis  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:25
Member (2003)
Greek to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Parasites etc. Apr 13, 2014

I suspect that all these new little "crowdsourcing" businesses that you see popping-up everywhere, prove the following:

a. Some people are wasting government grants for new businesses, by trying to apply methods designed for other industries to the translation industry.

b. Despite of what they tell you, there is a tremendous profit margin in this industry (for now...), but it's been consumed by the middle-men. That's why more agencies are jumping in without even knowing what a translation is.

c. The image of translators is very low among the merchants who "sell translations". They' ve been trained to pay them almost less than unemployment, but they tell their clients that they have "top professionals" (!).

d. Translators themselves have not realized that they are businesses themselves - they live under the impression that they are unprivileged cotton field workers. And their behavior shows exactly that ("yes massa"), which in turn "justifies" the response from the other side.

...and other things. When end clients realize that they are paying real money for this, they will run to Google (it's free anyway...), which will push Google to improve its engine and charge a tiny fee. This will bankrupt the current luxurious industry within a few weeks.
Then it will be too late for me and others to repeat "see? told ya". This whole "competition and free market" excuse to lower worker's fees will simply go out the window, because the industry is seeing only ONE very narrow side of it. They use primitive tactics ("just lower the worker's pay and pretend you' re a socialist"), without seeing what happens down the road.
Unsatisfied translators will not take their side when Google becomes the elephant (due to their low fees, they got little or nothing to lose).


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Phil Hand  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 20:25
Chinese to English
Nice analogy Apr 14, 2014

Reminds us that depressingly often, our clients don't seem to think that our translations should fly.

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Eleftherios Kritikakis  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:25
Member (2003)
Greek to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
What's the common interest Apr 14, 2014

Between two "so and so" translations, the end-client will chose the free one, Google.
The end client will pay only for something that's really worth it.

I bet that some companies will just send an "instruction" to their translators as follows: "Please make sure the translation sounds a lot more expensive".

Lol.


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Eleftherios Kritikakis  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:25
Member (2003)
Greek to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Strong alliances Apr 14, 2014

My point is, that it's a more solid model when companies pay their translators well for a good product, because:

- they can justify the fee for the production of a substantially better product than automatic translation

- the translators will defend the companies because they are paid well... it makes more sense defending a partner than a random computer throwing peanuts to you.


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:25
Member (2000)
Russian to English
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Planned servicing Apr 14, 2014

As a former aircraft engine fitter, I wonder if the analogy can be taken further. In the early 1950s, the RAF introduced a concept known as “planned servicing”. There was an elaborate timetable setting out who would be working where and for how long. The idea was that this would enable the routine servicing of aircraft to be carried out faster. It was tried somewhere as an experiment and it seemed to work, so they tried to introduce it more widely. It was a flop. The trial had worked because all the spares were immediately available, all the fitters had all the special tools required for each job and the aircraft was in good order to start with. In real life, necessary spares often had to be ordered in when the need for them was discovered, which could take days or weeks. The tools needed were often not available either. And most aircraft had something above the routine service that needed to be done. No time was allowed for the little emergencies that are always happening (such as dropping a nut between the cylinder blocks and having to fish for it with a magnet on a string). So tight deadlines, over-optimistic ideas about tools available, failure to allow for unexpected extra work or for time-consuming things going wrong caused the whole idea to crash.

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Daniel Bird  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:25
German to English
Barriers to entry Apr 14, 2014

This is what the discussion usually returns to. In the case of translation there are none. Over time more and more people have come to realise this, especially with the neo-libs trumpeting the concept of knowledge economies that as a deliberate by-product, neatly commoditises the individual.
Terrifying ain't it?


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Eleftherios Kritikakis  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:25
Member (2003)
Greek to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
The question Apr 14, 2014

I briefly referred to the example of a manager (let's say in any industry) who chops workers' wages on a daily basis (and enjoys it, as well as the bonus that comes along with it), and then pretends to be a socialist. Or the manager who says to the client "we got top professionals" and then pays unemployment rate. I was referring to human hypocrisy or misrepresentation, not politics in general.

There is no group solution to this problem, as it's impossible to convince even one person to do something about this issue.

My posting has to do with me asking: "how would you personally deal with this issue?"

I'm talking of course about the gradual death of about 90% of this industry.


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nordiste  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 14:25
English to French
+ ...
I can see what you mean ... Apr 14, 2014

Eleftherios Kritikakis wrote:

.... That's why more agencies are jumping in without even knowing what a translation is.



See here:

http://www.proz.com/forum/getting_established/267574-management_plan_for_a_translation_company.html


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philgoddard
United States
Member (2009)
German to English
+ ...
Nordiste Apr 14, 2014

I love the idea that they've rented an office, and they want to know what to do next!

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nordiste  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 14:25
English to French
+ ...
I had a few suggestions ... Apr 14, 2014

philgoddard wrote:

I love the idea that they've rented an office, and they want to know what to do next!


I had a few ideas for their next move... but I refrained to post them, on second thought I am afraid that they are not in accordance with Proz Site Rule #4


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Terence Noonan  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 08:25
German to English
+ ...
No barriers to entry? Apr 14, 2014

Daniel Bird wrote:

This is what the discussion usually returns to. In the case of translation there are none. Over time more and more people have come to realise this, especially with the neo-libs trumpeting the concept of knowledge economies that as a deliberate by-product, neatly commoditises the individual.
Terrifying ain't it?



No barriers to entry? This may be true in the absolute bottom of the market where people are "editing" Google translated documents, but in most cases to be a translator you must have a command of the source language that is almost never attained without spending several years in the source language country, in addition to excellent critical reading and writing skills. In the case of translations into native English, my experience is that over 90 percent of Anglophone expats decide not to bother learning the language of the host country and instead limit their social interactions to English-speaking locals. I know very few people that can do my job. The low barriers of entry in this business are those for the middlemen.

[Edited at 2014-04-14 21:40 GMT]


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Crowdsourcing airplane manufacturing

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