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your opinion on translation service providers
Thread poster: Adjoa Ano
Jun 9, 2016

Hello,

I am fairly new to this forum and was wondering if you could help with the questions below.

I manage translations and voice over in 30+ languages and I am looking for a few LSPs that are reliable, have good processes most importantly and, if possible, treats/pays well their freelance translators.
1. Any recommendations?
2. How do you know if the agency is following their TEP process? For example, how is it possible for a translated material to come out bad if it has had 2 people looking at it?
3. How do you ensure that the linguist actually looks at context while translating. For example, in our case, we deal with courses and provide a link to the course in the source language. Is it too much to ask?

As translators working with LSPs, you probably have a better visibility over those agencies' processes.

Thank you so much for taking the time

Adjoa


 

Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:30
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
What is your position in the supply chain? Jun 13, 2016

Adjoa Ano wrote:
I manage translations and voice over in 30+ languages and I am looking for a few LSPs that are reliable, have good processes most importantly and, if possible, treats/pays well their freelance translators.

Does that mean you're a freelancer (dealing with 30+ languagesicon_eek.gif?), or an agency outsourcing work to freelancers?
1. Any recommendations?

We aren't allowed to name names here
2. How do you know if the agency is following their TEP process? For example, how is it possible for a translated material to come out bad if it has had 2 people looking at it?
3. How do you ensure that the linguist actually looks at context while translating. For example, in our case, we deal with courses and provide a link to the course in the source language. Is it too much to ask?

Again, I'm confused about your direction of interest.

If you're interested in freelancers working with you, as a "better" agency, then maybe you should say so. OTOH, advertising in that way is also against site rules.


 

Jessy Charrier  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 14:30
Member (2015)
English to French
Easy Jun 13, 2016

Adjoa Ano wrote:

2. How do you know if the agency is following their TEP process? For example, how is it possible for a translated material to come out bad if it has had 2 people looking at it?
Adjoa


Hello,

this one is easy: you just need 1 crappy linguist in the pair. If the translator is really bad, the editor will not be able to do much about it. If the editor is bad, he/she can ruin the translation. The more is not always the better. In an ideal world, you would only need one linguist, who could really polish his work.


 

Kay Denney  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 14:30
Member (Apr 2018)
French to English
you can follow processes Jun 13, 2016

till you're blue in the face, but the fact of the matter is that it's not a process that makes a good translation, it's a translator.

Translators tend to work better when you don't put too much pressure on them, in terms of time and money. So if the agency quotes reasonable deadlines and charges more than you really wanted to pay, there's a chance that the translator will be in a position to put in some good work.

Finding a translator who translates into their native language, has some specialist knowledge in your line of business, has spent a fair amount of time in countries where the source and native languages are spoken, and displays a fair degree of enthusiasm for their job is probably one of the best ways of getting a good translation.


 

Maxi Schwarz
Local time: 07:30
German to English
+ ...
on questions 2 & 3 Jun 13, 2016

2. How do you know if the agency is following their TEP process? For example, how is it possible for a translated material to come out bad if it has had 2 people looking at it?

I'm writing in as a translator. As the trained translator, I am the professional who has the expertise and knowledge to first of all produce a correct translation, ask pertinent questions of the end client if needed, and have a quality assurance process in place whereby the final product is checked thoroughly before being sent out. I have worked for only one LSP that routinely has a second person proofread my work. i have on occasion hired a colleague with specialized expertise to check my translation, and paid this out of pocket. Having the training, I also know who to look for, and can assess the quality of their work.

To answer your actual question, the LSP has to hire somebody who is at least as competent as the original translator (who hopefully is competent - but if the LSP went for "cheap and fast" s/he may not be). It is common enough for a proofreader to insert error into a correct translation. Having a proofreader in order to claim ISO standards can also be a trick to suggest QA is going on, when perhaps both people are being underpaid. Will the LSP know what to look for, or necessarily care?

My experience is limited to a few agencies in Canada. Most people are bilingual for English and French, so someone else proofreading my work hasn't been much of a problem. But then someone who doesn't understand German is hired to proofread my German to English translations. In German nouns are capitalized. So it has happened that the proofreader has thought he was dealing with proper names. I.e. "Er wohnt in einem Haus in Deutschland.", translated as "He lives in a house in Grmany" gets "corrected" to "He lives in Haus, Germany." or "Mr. Haus lives in Germany."

3. How do you ensure that the linguist actually looks at context while translating. For example, in our case, we deal with courses and provide a link to the course in the source language. Is it too much to ask?

I would hire a translator and not merely a linguist. It's like someone who knows anatomy might be a doctor or a sculptor, or simply know anatomy. Any professional translator considers context - that is Translation 101. And we don't only look at links provided by the end client. We do additional research as needed, and ask pertinent questions when applicable.
As translators working with LSPs, you probably have a better visibility over those agencies' processes.

Actually, in general, we wouldn't know much about their processes. Usually my agency clients will send me a document and ask "Can you do this? By when can you do this? What will you charge?", and then make arrangements with their client accordingly. The translation process and QA process is largely mine. I expect an agency to communicate promptly with the end client if I have any questions. If the agency doesn't do so already, I ask the agency to have their client look at my translation (or draft, if a hard copy is needed, i.e. certified) and come back with any questions or concerns. But how they handle it internally, I wouldn't actually know.


 

Łukasz Gos-Furmankiewicz  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 14:30
English to Polish
+ ...
... Jun 14, 2016

Adjoa Ano wrote:

Hello,

I am fairly new to this forum and was wondering if you could help with the questions below.


Hi.icon_smile.gif

I manage translations and voice over in 30+ languages and I am looking for a few LSPs that are reliable, have good processes most importantly and, if possible, treats/pays well their freelance translators.


From a management perspective processes always look very important, but they can't do much for translation quality. Client service yes, translation quality, nope. That depends squarely on the talent of the people used and their work ethics.

As far as treating freelance translators well or paying them well, I'm afraid I'm not going to have good news for you. The pay tends to be awful, and contracts tend to be long, complicated, one-sided and anything from arrogant to humiliating.

1. Any recommendations?


Get an inhouse language department. Build a core team of trusted people at least for the most important languages. Avoid agencies if at all possible.

How do you know if the agency is following their TEP process?


File signatures, files with tracked changes, comments, metadata etc. Otherwise you can't tell. Bargain prices decrease the probability. ISO and other certificates don't guarantee much, let alone promises made on their websites.

For example, how is it possible for a translated material to come out bad if it has had 2 people looking at it?


Easy. They'd have you believe quantity matters. Yes, two people have a higher chance of spotting language errors and mistranslations than one person, but the quality of translation depends critically on individual talent. It's demanding work, highly intellectual and highly creative at the same time. No matter how much brainpower you have, you will always find a way to use all of it. And smart people burn through a lot of energy when working on a text. Agencies insist on paying a pittance, so they end up working with low-cost freelancers only and closing themselves off from the best talent.

In probability terms:

(i) A good proofreader/reviser/editor can clean up after a poor translator, but solid foundation will be missing, and from an empty vassal even Solomon cannot pour water. (ii) A poor translator and a poor reviser won't somehow make a great translation. And (iii) a poor reviser can destroy a good translation by a good translator. Ending up with (iv) a good translator and a good reviser would require a awful lot of luck.

Bottom line: not just any two, it matters what kind of people look at it.

3. How do you ensure that the linguist actually looks at context while translating.


You can't. You can't take a dirt-cheap freelancer, write a long list of obligations and checklists and a hold-harmless clause into the contract and somehow make it work. They can hope to deflect the client's lawsuit with it (less easy than they think), but that's it.

In short, unless they pay professional fees, you're stuck with amateurs, semi-pros and the occasional halfway decent pro or particularly talented amateur with low self-esteem or bad luck or an appreciation for very modest living.

No process magic can generate talent that simply isn't there.

For example, in our case, we deal with courses and provide a link to the course in the source language. Is it too much to ask?


It depends on the time required and how much the freelancer is paid. Discount prices and additional requests don't mesh together too well, no matter what agencies say to make you believe it.

Thank you so much for taking the time


Always.


 

Michael Wetzel  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:30
German to English
Hire a project manager Jun 14, 2016

Exept in terms of scale, I agree with Łukasz on the basic question about how to do things right: I doubt you need a whole language department and, depending on the scale of your business, you may be better served by a freelancer than a salaried employee.
You need a real expert in the field of audio-visual translation to give you guidance in terms of budgeting and processes and to actively help you to find good outsourcers or freelancers for various languages and fields. A consistent partner, who is responsible to you and specifically looking out for your interests, is the exact opposite of the shifting array of project managers, sub-agencies, and freelancers offered by mega-agencies.
By hiring an individual to do the initial (every language, every subject, every medium) agency's job, you will get much better and more reliable results in a more transparent and adaptable process. You and the PM will be able to build on past experience and almost certainly end up with more money left over in your budget for the specialized agencies and freelancers who actually do the work.

José Henrique Lamensdorf obviously comes to mind here, although I'm not sure he offers this kind of service. Max Deryagin has also proven his expertise in this field in the forums here. The directories here are probably full of promising candidates, but José and Max are very visible in the forums here.

As far as getting freelancers to look at source material goes, you could consider actually specifically including this activity as an item in your order. Obviously, this shouldn't be necessary and any translator ought to do it as a matter of course, but a lot of translators' (and their agencies') prices are based on working extremely fast and that means cutting corners. Specifically listing this service also means that if the translator obviously doesn't base his or her work on the reference material, then you can demand that the translation be revised after the fact to fulfil this requirement.


 

Adjoa Ano
TOPIC STARTER
Thank for your input Jessy Jun 23, 2016

Jessy Charrier wrote:

Adjoa Ano wrote:

2. How do you know if the agency is following their TEP process? For example, how is it possible for a translated material to come out bad if it has had 2 people looking at it?
Adjoa


Hello,

this one is easy: you just need 1 crappy linguist in the pair. If the translator is really bad, the editor will not be able to do much about it. If the editor is bad, he/she can ruin the translation. The more is not always the better. In an ideal world, you would only need one linguist, who could really polish his work.


 

Adjoa Ano
TOPIC STARTER
Hello Sheila Jun 23, 2016

Thank you for your input. I am a translation program manager trying to understand and find solutions to the quality issues and perpetual rework I am going through. I am paying for services I do not always get and I am just trying to understand the other side from experts like you.

To make it clear, I do not work for a translation agency but for a company that provides translated courses per clients' request

As far as working for freelancers. it is a possibility if I can understand how it works and what the benefits would be.

Sheila Wilson wrote:

Adjoa Ano wrote:
I manage translations and voice over in 30+ languages and I am looking for a few LSPs that are reliable, have good processes most importantly and, if possible, treats/pays well their freelance translators.

Does that mean you're a freelancer (dealing with 30+ languagesicon_eek.gif?), or an agency outsourcing work to freelancers?
1. Any recommendations?

We aren't allowed to name names here
2. How do you know if the agency is following their TEP process? For example, how is it possible for a translated material to come out bad if it has had 2 people looking at it?
3. How do you ensure that the linguist actually looks at context while translating. For example, in our case, we deal with courses and provide a link to the course in the source language. Is it too much to ask?

Again, I'm confused about your direction of interest.

If you're interested in freelancers working with you, as a "better" agency, then maybe you should say so. OTOH, advertising in that way is also against site rules.


 

Adjoa Ano
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you for your reply Jun 23, 2016

I assume that the best place to find translators would be this site?

Thanks


Texte Style wrote:

till you're blue in the face, but the fact of the matter is that it's not a process that makes a good translation, it's a translator.

Translators tend to work better when you don't put too much pressure on them, in terms of time and money. So if the agency quotes reasonable deadlines and charges more than you really wanted to pay, there's a chance that the translator will be in a position to put in some good work.

Finding a translator who translates into their native language, has some specialist knowledge in your line of business, has spent a fair amount of time in countries where the source and native languages are spoken, and displays a fair degree of enthusiasm for their job is probably one of the best ways of getting a good translation.


 

Adjoa Ano
TOPIC STARTER
Great input!!! Jun 23, 2016

Maxi,

This is exactly what I was looking for. All great answers. It is very hard for us, LSPs clients to see what's happening on the other side. I used to work with in-house translators and struggled a lot to show value in their work. Working with LSPs has been a struggle and I need to find a quick solution because my budget is shrinking. We are a very small company and cannot afford the constant rework.

I have started to realize some of the issues you have described but it is such a challenge to overcome them.

Thank you again for your input.


Maxi Schwarz wrote:

2. How do you know if the agency is following their TEP process? For example, how is it possible for a translated material to come out bad if it has had 2 people looking at it?

I'm writing in as a translator. As the trained translator, I am the professional who has the expertise and knowledge to first of all produce a correct translation, ask pertinent questions of the end client if needed, and have a quality assurance process in place whereby the final product is checked thoroughly before being sent out. I have worked for only one LSP that routinely has a second person proofread my work. i have on occasion hired a colleague with specialized expertise to check my translation, and paid this out of pocket. Having the training, I also know who to look for, and can assess the quality of their work.

To answer your actual question, the LSP has to hire somebody who is at least as competent as the original translator (who hopefully is competent - but if the LSP went for "cheap and fast" s/he may not be). It is common enough for a proofreader to insert error into a correct translation. Having a proofreader in order to claim ISO standards can also be a trick to suggest QA is going on, when perhaps both people are being underpaid. Will the LSP know what to look for, or necessarily care?

My experience is limited to a few agencies in Canada. Most people are bilingual for English and French, so someone else proofreading my work hasn't been much of a problem. But then someone who doesn't understand German is hired to proofread my German to English translations. In German nouns are capitalized. So it has happened that the proofreader has thought he was dealing with proper names. I.e. "Er wohnt in einem Haus in Deutschland.", translated as "He lives in a house in Grmany" gets "corrected" to "He lives in Haus, Germany." or "Mr. Haus lives in Germany."

3. How do you ensure that the linguist actually looks at context while translating. For example, in our case, we deal with courses and provide a link to the course in the source language. Is it too much to ask?

I would hire a translator and not merely a linguist. It's like someone who knows anatomy might be a doctor or a sculptor, or simply know anatomy. Any professional translator considers context - that is Translation 101. And we don't only look at links provided by the end client. We do additional research as needed, and ask pertinent questions when applicable.
As translators working with LSPs, you probably have a better visibility over those agencies' processes.

Actually, in general, we wouldn't know much about their processes. Usually my agency clients will send me a document and ask "Can you do this? By when can you do this? What will you charge?", and then make arrangements with their client accordingly. The translation process and QA process is largely mine. I expect an agency to communicate promptly with the end client if I have any questions. If the agency doesn't do so already, I ask the agency to have their client look at my translation (or draft, if a hard copy is needed, i.e. certified) and come back with any questions or concerns. But how they handle it internally, I wouldn't actually know.


 

Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:30
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
Thanks for the clarification, Adjoa Jun 23, 2016

Adjoa Ano wrote:
I am a translation program manager trying to understand and find solutions to the quality issues and perpetual rework I am going through. I am paying for services I do not always get and I am just trying to understand the other side from experts like you.

To make it clear, I do not work for a translation agency but for a company that provides translated courses per clients' request

As far as working for freelancers. it is a possibility if I can understand how it works and what the benefits would be.

Right. That's a little clearer. So you provide training materials in multiple languages to your clients, if I've got it right?

I suppose outsourcing everything to one multinational that deals in every service in every language seems to make sense. However the biggest, in my IMHO, treat translation as a commodity rather than as an intellectual service, and put little emphasis on real quality, while shouting about QA, QC and ISO-this-and-that. They generally pay on a strict "rate per new word" basis, so the translator is racing the clock and consulting other material means less paid work per day. Also, rates tend to be very low. The worst ones actually pay their translators and proofreaders about the same per word - acknowledging that there will be lots of work (too much) for the proofreader. The result will never be as good as if the best translator had been paid the best (!) rate, and then a good proofreader paid to catch any slips (e.g. 'form' in place of 'from' in English). You could throw money at a second proofreader, but it would still be a flawed text as it isn't a proofreader's job to retranslate.

I personally think you would do better to approach smaller, more specialised agencies. I'm thinking about ones that specialise in the training sector or in voiceovers (a very different kettle of fish from text translation, of course), or in languages that the founders speak personally. Such agencies tend to rely on their good reputation for quality of service and the end product - and happy suppliers and clients are both needed to build that reputation. Their quote to you would include time for a suitable translator to take your context into account, and for a suitable proofreader. They may seem pricier at first but getting it right first time is usually cost-effective. You can search for suitable specialist LSPs through the directory here.

On the other hand, if you work mainly with just a few languages you could contact freelancers who list the relevant skills and services. You can do that here, too. By filtering your search and reading individuals' profiles you should get an idea of who is likely to do a good job, then you can contact a few for quotes. You could either arrange for proofreading yourself or commission the freelancer to get it done. I personally quote extra for that second pair of eyes if non-agency clients request it. For agency clients, I assume they'll have it proofread.

Basically, I'm saying that no ISO standard is going to make your job a success. It's better to have confidence in a conscientious supplier. Those proverbial monkeys might be able to write the Bible, but I bet even a thousand of them working together would leave a whole load of mistakesicon_frown.gif.


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 09:30
English to Portuguese
+ ...
I feel as having been drafted Jun 23, 2016

Adjoa Ano wrote:

Thank you for your input. I am a translation program manager trying to understand and find solutions to the quality issues and perpetual rework I am going through. I am paying for services I do not always get and I am just trying to understand the other side from experts like you.

To make it clear, I do not work for a translation agency but for a company that provides translated courses per clients' request

As far as working for freelancers. it is a possibility if I can understand how it works and what the benefits would be.


Michael Wetzel wrote:

José Henrique Lamensdorf obviously comes to mind here, although I'm not sure he offers this kind of service.


Indeed, that's been my main specialty for years: complete localization of training programs, no matter if it's just a self-learning booklet or a complex system involving printed materials, video, software, board games, whatever.

However I only cover ONE language pair in either direction: English (US as target) Portuguese (BR as target).

I'll try to give you as much useful input as I can, without writing an entire book here.

A while ago I put together some GENERIC pointers to guide the decision between hiring a translation agency or a freelance translator at http://www.lamensdorf.com.br/trxag.html . Try to adapt it to your present situation.

FYI many great translation agency PMs don't have a clue about video/AV dubbing or subtitling. All too often in such cases they ask me to contact the end-client directly, trusting my ethics that I'll present myself as someone from their agency, because they are unable to ask the questions I need answered, and equally unable to interpret the answers they get in a useful manner. Of course, I never failed their trust. If the client asks me about prices, I tell them that I don't handle money matters, that's up to the PM. Fortunately so far I haven't had to introduce myself as a staff member of different translation agencies to the same end-client.

If your time is valuable enough to justify the extra cost of always having an agency to manage all the bills, deadlines, deliveries, sequential stages, file transfers, integration etc., but you'd remain available for direct contact with translators on technical issues, draw the line, and make the setting blatantly clear to all parties involved.


I would like to add a short story on cutting corners/costs.

Long before CAT tools came up, I was doing translation and DTP of training programs that usually comprised: a) Course leader/facilitator's guide; b) Participants' workbooks; and c) PowerPoint presentations. Of course, most of (b) and (c) content are repeated verbatim in (a).

At a certain point in time, some chicken-or-egg moment, some clients had to find a way to cut costs. How did they do it? They began assigning me only the Leader's Guide to translate. Then they'd have a sesquilingual staff member of theirs painstakingly (of course, a sesquilingual non-translator will know nothing about CAT tools) copy and paste my translations from (a) onto (b) and (c).

Of course, it would be very rare to have (a) covering 100% of the (b) and (c) content, so they either guessed whatever was missing, or used machine translation.

The final result was that the course leader got my supposedly pristine translation. Participants received the sesquilingual staffer's act, which was widely distributed, even management had an occasional glimpse at it.

As it was less-than-perfect, the big question came up: Who translated this @#$%&???

As the staffer shall forever remain anonymous, my name came up as "the same guy who always did it for us", oblivious that my actual work was privy to the instructor. Some may have ventured that I'd become addicted to hooch or whatever.

To avoid that, thanks to CAT tools, I began offering repeated segments for free, provided I was assigned the entire training package to translate. A win-win for all involved.


 

Adjoa Ano
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you for your reply Jun 29, 2016

Lukasz,

This was very entertaining and a sad thruth. Unfortunately, we are a tiny company with 1 project manager working for me and budget wise, we do not have the funds to have a language department because of the type/frequency of client requests.

I may request some help in looking at our TMs and courses and cleaning them up, not too sure about working with freelancers and being burned out in the process. W sometime handle many projects at once and I am not sure how reliable freelancers are with deadlines.

I got a lot to learn I guess.

THank you again.

Łukasz Gos-Furmankiewicz wrote:

Adjoa Ano wrote:

Hello,

I am fairly new to this forum and was wondering if you could help with the questions below.


Hi.icon_smile.gif

I manage translations and voice over in 30+ languages and I am looking for a few LSPs that are reliable, have good processes most importantly and, if possible, treats/pays well their freelance translators.


From a management perspective processes always look very important, but they can't do much for translation quality. Client service yes, translation quality, nope. That depends squarely on the talent of the people used and their work ethics.

As far as treating freelance translators well or paying them well, I'm afraid I'm not going to have good news for you. The pay tends to be awful, and contracts tend to be long, complicated, one-sided and anything from arrogant to humiliating.

1. Any recommendations?


Get an inhouse language department. Build a core team of trusted people at least for the most important languages. Avoid agencies if at all possible.

How do you know if the agency is following their TEP process?


File signatures, files with tracked changes, comments, metadata etc. Otherwise you can't tell. Bargain prices decrease the probability. ISO and other certificates don't guarantee much, let alone promises made on their websites.

For example, how is it possible for a translated material to come out bad if it has had 2 people looking at it?


Easy. They'd have you believe quantity matters. Yes, two people have a higher chance of spotting language errors and mistranslations than one person, but the quality of translation depends critically on individual talent. It's demanding work, highly intellectual and highly creative at the same time. No matter how much brainpower you have, you will always find a way to use all of it. And smart people burn through a lot of energy when working on a text. Agencies insist on paying a pittance, so they end up working with low-cost freelancers only and closing themselves off from the best talent.

In probability terms:

(i) A good proofreader/reviser/editor can clean up after a poor translator, but solid foundation will be missing, and from an empty vassal even Solomon cannot pour water. (ii) A poor translator and a poor reviser won't somehow make a great translation. And (iii) a poor reviser can destroy a good translation by a good translator. Ending up with (iv) a good translator and a good reviser would require a awful lot of luck.

Bottom line: not just any two, it matters what kind of people look at it.

3. How do you ensure that the linguist actually looks at context while translating.


You can't. You can't take a dirt-cheap freelancer, write a long list of obligations and checklists and a hold-harmless clause into the contract and somehow make it work. They can hope to deflect the client's lawsuit with it (less easy than they think), but that's it.

In short, unless they pay professional fees, you're stuck with amateurs, semi-pros and the occasional halfway decent pro or particularly talented amateur with low self-esteem or bad luck or an appreciation for very modest living.

No process magic can generate talent that simply isn't there.

For example, in our case, we deal with courses and provide a link to the course in the source language. Is it too much to ask?


It depends on the time required and how much the freelancer is paid. Discount prices and additional requests don't mesh together too well, no matter what agencies say to make you believe it.

Thank you so much for taking the time


Always.


 

Adjoa Ano
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Michael Jun 29, 2016

That will depend on how much that partner will chargeicon_smile.gif. My main focus is to have someone review our TMs and help clean them up. integrity is very important here as I feel that we are constantly being taken advantage of.

I'll look at the directories a little more and see what I can find.

Thank you again doe all the advice.

Michael Wetzel wrote:

Exept in terms of scale, I agree with Łukasz on the basic question about how to do things right: I doubt you need a whole language department and, depending on the scale of your business, you may be better served by a freelancer than a salaried employee.
You need a real expert in the field of audio-visual translation to give you guidance in terms of budgeting and processes and to actively help you to find good outsourcers or freelancers for various languages and fields. A consistent partner, who is responsible to you and specifically looking out for your interests, is the exact opposite of the shifting array of project managers, sub-agencies, and freelancers offered by mega-agencies.
By hiring an individual to do the initial (every language, every subject, every medium) agency's job, you will get much better and more reliable results in a more transparent and adaptable process. You and the PM will be able to build on past experience and almost certainly end up with more money left over in your budget for the specialized agencies and freelancers who actually do the work.

José Henrique Lamensdorf obviously comes to mind here, although I'm not sure he offers this kind of service. Max Deryagin has also proven his expertise in this field in the forums here. The directories here are probably full of promising candidates, but José and Max are very visible in the forums here.

As far as getting freelancers to look at source material goes, you could consider actually specifically including this activity as an item in your order. Obviously, this shouldn't be necessary and any translator ought to do it as a matter of course, but a lot of translators' (and their agencies') prices are based on working extremely fast and that means cutting corners. Specifically listing this service also means that if the translator obviously doesn't base his or her work on the reference material, then you can demand that the translation be revised after the fact to fulfil this requirement.



 
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