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We need a whole new paradigm
Thread poster: Daniel Frisano

Dan Lucas  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:33
Member (2014)
Japanese to English
Actually, people do like work Feb 22

LEXpert wrote:
Nobody likes work, no matter how highly paid - that's why it's called "work" and not "leisure" or "rest" or "fun", or whatever.

This statement is utterly untrue. There are many people who like work and who it fulfilling, even when it is demanding. Like you, I don't necessarily like working every day of every week, but...

Still doesn't mean the PM has to rub it in with their thoughtless "Have great weekend!".

... if I do decide to work on a weekend, I don't allow that - note that emotions are things that are controlled by ourselves, not by other people - myself to get upset when other people close a conversation with a polite and harmless parting comment. Why should I? For all they know, I am going to have a great weekend. Not everybody assumes that couple of days' work is the end of the world.

Regards,
Dan


 

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
Sorry, Dan, but... Feb 22

I also think it's a bit thoughtless and insensitive to wish someone a good day/weekend knowing that it's being spent working rather than engaging in fun leisure activities.

You'd hope really that they might make the slight effort required to come up with something more appropriate to the circumstances rather than some glib platitude.

While it's not going to make me cry, it does show how little they care, and this is liable to colour the working relationship.

I also think it's quite normal, albeit possibly not universal, for people to have things they'd rather do over the weekend than work (dancing, drinking, shagging, whatever).

I enjoy my job most of the time, but I'd always still rather be doing something else!


 

Dan Lucas  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:33
Member (2014)
Japanese to English
To a point... Feb 24

Chris S wrote:
I also think it's a bit thoughtless and insensitive to wish someone a good day/weekend knowing that it's being spent working rather than engaging in fun leisure activities.

I agree with you and LEXpert that there are clients who can be glib and thoughtless. I just don't let myself get worked up about it. If it gets too much, I cease providing services to them.

Regards,
Dan


 

Kay Denney  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 12:33
Member (Apr 2018)
French to English
I agree Feb 25

Dan Lucas wrote:

Chris S wrote:
I also think it's a bit thoughtless and insensitive to wish someone a good day/weekend knowing that it's being spent working rather than engaging in fun leisure activities.

I agree with you and LEXpert that there are clients who can be glib and thoughtless. I just don't let myself get worked up about it. If it gets too much, I cease providing services to them.

Regards,
Dan

If you can't work for someone unless they have full-on empathy, you'll end up not working. Very few people can demonstrate empathy, especially at work with colleagues, suppliers and clients they have not had any say in choosing.

I remember with the underground bombings in London, a client whose huge project was due that day asked me if any of my friends or family had been affected. He had been prepared to tell me I could deliver later if necessary. I was touched that he thought of me (my boss didn't even mention it). However I would never *expect* somebody to think of me like that in a professional situation.


 

deutschenglisch  Identity Verified
Australia
Member (2003)
German to English
The problem is the Middleman Mar 7

Daniel Frisano wrote:

I don’t know about you, but personally, I’ve had it with clients forcing me to use certain tools or doing things their way, and it’s happening more and more. I wish there were more of us adhering to professional principles, such as:

1. No requiring any specific CAT tools. I’ll use whatever tool I deem appropriate. Try telling your dentist or plumber to use a certain tool, and see what they’ll answer.

2. No working on the cloud, remote servers, etc. Once I had a client complaining that I hadn’t started yet with a 4000-word project with the deadline 3 days away. Dear client, if I do it in a week or an afternoon, this is none of your business. All that matters is that the final product is flawless.

3. No using clients’ platforms for job management or accounting. I have my system, I’ll send my invoices at the end of the month. Imagine having 20 clients with 20 different platforms to logon to. Would your life be easier?

4. No signing 12-page Terms and Conditions, NDAs, etc. Why must I accept terms and conditions when I am the user of something and also when I am a provider?

5. No tests. Do you require that your accountant or your gardener pass a “test” before you hire them?

6. Enough with calling ourselves “freelancers”. Is a lawyer a freelancer?

7. Enough with first-name basis right from the start. It’s Mr. (or Ms., or Mrs.), if you don’t mind.

In the past, yes, I have accepted to use a specific tool, yes, I have worked on Memsource and such, yes, I have used client-side invoicing platforms, yes, I have signed NDAs without even looking, yes (sigh), I have done a few tests, et cetera.

But you know what? Of all my good, long-standing clients, none has ever forced me or even suggested that I do any of the aforementioned.

Conclusion: if we are not treated as professionals, we have none but ourselves to blame. Time to re-focus.

These are my 7 guidelines. Feel free to add yours.

(Proviso: this has nothing to do with rates. To all the usual whiners, you’ll have plenty of future chances to let us know how underpaid you think you are).


[Edited at 2017-12-26 22:20 GMT]


I thought the internet would gradually kill them off but they have got stronger.
Many are probably zombie companies kept alive by low interest rates. I know of a couple of big names who are struggling behind the scenes.

2) Anyway, I tell them I work the way I want to work since I am a freelancer. If they want me to work a certain way they can hire me or words to that effect.
4) I understand NDAs though TandCs are all asymmetric and anyway not enforceable so why not sign and be damned. Of course objectively it is nonsense but have you ever tried to get anywhere in this field with a lawyer?
1) I use a few tools and try to stay flexible. Again understand it if there are memories. Shame the industry hasnt come up with a properly enforced standard and still fragmented despite diminishing returns


I thought by new paradigm you would mean
* instant payments (after quality review)
* cryptocurrency payments also accepted
* rate based on location of translator not company!!!
* standard word output minimums


 
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