Email Disclaimer
Thread poster: BelkisDV

BelkisDV  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:59
Spanish to English
+ ...
Aug 15, 2006

Dear all,

This is a disclaimer that has been appearing at the bottom of several emails I've received sent by outsourcers or direct clients. I have decided to use it for my own protection as well.

Delegating responsibility for errors we did not make ourselves is critical in this business.


"This email may contain attachments of translations provided by XXX and/or confidential information. Even the slightest modification(s) to the original attached file may alter the meaning; therefore, you are hereby advised to contact XXX for any modifications or revisions to the foregoing. Please note that special characters in other languages are easily corrupted via Email transmission. You are being provided a XXXX file of your translation in order for you to compare your final published documents. It is your responsibility to closely compare your final files against your own files to ensure the email has not been corrupted during transmission. XXX shall not be held liable for misprinted and/or corrupted files. If you have any questions as to whether or not your electronic file has been corrupted please call: (XXX) XXX-XXXX. You or your company are responsible for checking final copy. The information contained herein is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and contains confidential information; therefore, unauthorized use or disclosure is hereby prohibited."

Feedback? (Yes I know it's a bit harsh but if they are using it for legal purposes I believe I should do the same).

Regards,
Belkis


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Dina Abdo  Identity Verified
Palestine
Local time: 00:59
Member (2005)
Arabic
+ ...
Nope, not harsh at all! Aug 15, 2006

Some NDAs may contain even "harsher" terms and conditions. Go for it ... if they use it, then you can use it as well. Beside, most clients (agencies) use similar forms in their e-mails nowdays

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Claudia Krysztofiak  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:59
English to German
+ ...
Say it in a friendly way Aug 15, 2006


... You are being provided a XXXX file of your translation in order for you to compare your final published documents.


Shouldn't this read: ...the translation prepared/made for you ... Your translation sounds to me, as if they were the translators and I found it a little confusing in this context.


You or your company are responsible for checking final copy.


... checking the final copy?

I am not sure, whether you can be held responsible for any of the mentioned errors anyway. Who uses email always has to be aware of such risks. Then again this may depend on national rules and regulations.

I would not use this tone talking to my customer in an email. I know, more and more people feel "obliged" or even "forced" to act like this, but I do not like my customers to talk to me like this, because it is not necessary, because I am a reasonable and friendly person (I hope!). And thus, the other way round, I do not talk to them like this. What I can do is give them the same information when sending the translation, within the body of my email and in a friendly and helping tone. More like: Please be aware of, please check carefully, otherwise I cannot guarantee.
You say the same thing. Why be harsh, even only a little, if it is not necessary?


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BelkisDV  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:59
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
A necessary evil nowadays Aug 15, 2006

Claudia Krysztofiak wrote:


... You are being provided a XXXX file of your translation in order for you to compare your final published documents.


Shouldn't this read: ...the translation prepared/made for you ... Your translation sounds to me, as if they were the translators and I found it a little confusing in this context.


You or your company are responsible for checking final copy.


... checking the final copy?

I am not sure, whether you can be held responsible for any of the mentioned errors anyway. Who uses email always has to be aware of such risks. Then again this may depend on national rules and regulations.

I would not use this tone talking to my customer in an email. I know, more and more people feel "obliged" or even "forced" to act like this, but I do not like my customers to talk to me like this, because it is not necessary, because I am a reasonable and friendly person (I hope!). And thus, the other way round, I do not talk to them like this. What I can do is give them the same information when sending the translation, within the body of my email and in a friendly and helping tone. More like: Please be aware of, please check carefully, otherwise I cannot guarantee.
You say the same thing. Why be harsh, even only a little, if it is not necessary?


Hi Claudia,

I did not translate anything, that was written by English speakers and included at the bottom of emails I've been receiving.

I also dislike not being addressed or 'talked to' in a friendly manner; however, being that I am a friendly person and most of my clients know me (except the ones who used that Disclaimer in their emails) the would not take it as being offensive.

The translation may not be in the program it was sent in originally because they may request a different program for the job itself. Therefore, that clause is necessary, it tells them exactly what program was used.

It is necessary at this point to delegate responsibililty. This field keeps growing and we are required to do things beyond the scope of our jobs. We are translators, we're not graphic artists, etc. So when the client sends me a file and I have to go to the trouble of figuring out or finding exactly what program it was created in that not only wastes my time, it also shows lack of professional courtesy from them. Most of the time they'll write back with "sorry, the file is in XXX program" when they clearly know I don't work with XXX program.

This industry requires more from of us each passing day. TRADOS, whose sole purpose is to cut the agency's costs, increase our workload and pay us less (if at all). But TRADOS isn't perfect so you have to 'teach it' as you go along, when you could have done it without it much faster and accurately (if you know what you're doing to begin with). Furthermore, what is the real purpose of CAT tools if not to ultimately replace translators?

I'm using the Disclaimer, as a matter of fact, I did 'polish' it before posting because it sounded as if I were to blame for mistakes they themselves could have made in-house.

Belkis

[Edited at 2006-08-15 12:32]

[Edited at 2006-08-15 12:33]


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