Selling on credit
Thread poster: The Misha
The Misha
Local time: 07:48
Russian to English
+ ...
Nov 10, 2007

I have started this thread as an offshoot of the most recent in the long string of discussions of non-payment or bad payment practices on the part of outsourcers. In this business, we essentially sell on credit and thus often find ourselves at the mercy of our clients. While ProZ does provide a rudimentary way to check a particular customer's credit record through feedback on BB, it is by far not enough.

When you buy merchandise online, you prepay or guarantee your payment with a credit card or paypal account. If the payment clears, the merchant ships, if not, you get no cigar. Of course, the ability to accept credit cards requires an upfront investment in eqipment on the part of the merchnat and involves processing costs too, but this arrangement eliminates the ever-present risk of non-payment, often involving far away countries where one has no legal recourse.

We are merchants too, we just sell a different kind of merchandise. Why should it be different with us? This business will only be what we make of it.


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:48
English to Spanish
+ ...
Sounds very sensible Nov 10, 2007

"Of course, the ability to accept credit cards requires an upfront investment in eqipment on the part of the merchant and involves processing costs too."

That might be the reason why many people do not do it. It would be interesting to know what the costs can be; for some it may be worthwhile, we know it is for many small businesses.


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Stanislaw Czech, MCIL  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:48
Member (2006)
English to Polish
+ ...
You could use Paypal Nov 11, 2007

It offers inexpensive (relatively) way of accepting credit cards.

Good luck!


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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 04:48
English to German
+ ...
Investment - yes, equipment - no. Nov 11, 2007

Equipment (which is pretty expensive, BTW) isn't necessary - you will hardly ever get hold of your client's credit or debit card to swipe it.

A few years ago I purchased a licence for online credit card processing. It also allows me to process electronic checks. I paid about USD 250, each transaction costs 7 or 10 cent, depending on the card type. It works great with direct clients because I charge a down payment upfront.

Agencies are a indeed a different story...


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juvera  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:48
English to Hungarian
+ ...
What is the main issue? Nov 11, 2007

I would have thought the main issue is not the method of payment, but the practice of sending off the goods and hoping to be paid for them... eventually.

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The Misha
Local time: 07:48
Russian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Juvera is right Nov 11, 2007

Yes, the issue is not the equipment or processing costs - those are not prohibitively high - but how to actually make the client, be he a direct one or an agency - prepay with a credit card or in any other way. He has no problem doing it when buying songs at iTunes or ordering office supplies, so why wouldn't he do the same for us? How do we change the existing mindset? Worldwide translator conspiracy? Any suggestions?

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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 13:48
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Setcom dot com Nov 11, 2007

The Misha wrote:
Of course, the ability to accept credit cards requires an upfront investment in eqipment on the part of the merchnat and involves processing costs too...


Want to accept payment by credit card? Try Setcom.com.


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Katerina Fragkiadaki  Identity Verified
Greece
Local time: 14:48
German to Greek
+ ...
shipping Nov 12, 2007

juvera wrote:

I would have thought the main issue is not the method of payment, but the practice of sending off the goods and hoping to be paid for them... eventually.


I've heard there is a trick where you can "lock" a word document that only parts of it are visible, so that the client can see that you have translated the document but will not be able to open it until you unlock it-receive the payment.

I am not aware of the procedure but would be interested to find out, so if someone knows I'd be glad to read his contribution.


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 13:48
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Analogies... Nov 12, 2007

Katerina Fragkiadaki wrote:
I've heard there is a trick where you can "lock" a word document that only parts of it are visible, so that the client can see that you have translated the document but will not be able to open it until you unlock it-receive the payment.


That would be like buying a car, only to find that it stops running after a few miles until you've paid the full sum. Or a plumber installing the new shower but blocking off the one pipe until you've paid in full.


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