List of standard subject categories for a translation memory (TM) wanted
Thread poster: lprd027

lprd027
Local time: 03:55
German to English
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Sep 15, 2012

I am looking for a standardised list of subject categories/sub-categories to enter into my TM, rather than invent my own. Is there such a thing and where can I find it.

[Subject edited by staff or moderator 2012-09-15 12:53 GMT]


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Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.)  Identity Verified
Thailand
Local time: 22:55
Member (2004)
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Your expertise Sep 15, 2012

If I were you, I would categorize TM based on my ability, rather than setting standards [without competent TM to apply actively].

Reason: No one is an expert in all disciplines.

Soonthon Lupkitaro

[Edited at 2012-09-15 13:09 GMT]


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Michael Beijer  Identity Verified
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Hi lprd027, Sep 15, 2012

As far as I know, no such official list exists, but I can offer you my own personal attempt. Please note that it is only a rough draft, and still very much a work in progress. E.g., many of the entries under the Domain heading are actually Subjects, and perhaps vice versa. However, you might be able to use it as the basis for constructing your own system. So, without further ado:

Domain > Subject

Accounting
Advertising industry
Aerospace engineering
Agriculture
Airconditioning
Archeology
Architecture
Art
Astronomy
Audio
Audits
Automotive > Lorry Parks
Aviation
Banking
Belgian Corporate Law
Biology
Botany
Bookkeeping
Brand Names
Building And Construction
Cable Management
Casting
CAT Tools
Chemical Engineering
Chemicals
Chemical Technology
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Commerce
Computers And IT
Computer Science
Consulting
Contracts > Service Level Agreements
Credit Management
Culinary
Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
Customs
Defense
Dentistry
Desktop Publishing
Dictionaries
Domain
Driving Directions
Dutch Corporate Law
Ecology
Economics
Education
Electrical Engineering
Electronic Data Processing
Electronics
Employment > Company Policies & Procedures > Employee Handbooks
Energy > Grid managers
Engineering
Environment
Environmental Performance Of Buildings
Ethics
EU
Finance
Fishing
Flexible Manufacturing Systems
Food
Food Processing
Food Standards
Forestry
Forms And Paperwork
Founding
Fuels
Gas
Geneology
General
Geology
Geometry
Geotechnics
Government
Government Procurement
Grammar
Health
Health & Safety
History
Hydrology
Hydraulic Engineering
HR > coach training
Idioms
IFRS
Industry
Information Management
Insurance
International Trade
Internet slang
Investment
Joinery
Law > Patents, Trademarks, Copyright
Letters
Lexicography
Linguistics
Literary
Locksmithing > Locking Plans / Master Key Plans
Logistics
Machining
Marketing
Masonry
Mathematics
Mechanical
Mechanical Engineering
Mechatronics
Medical > Diseases
Medical Technology
Metallurgy > hot dip galvanising
Meteorology
Military
Mineralogy
Mining
Misc.
MSDS
Multimedia
Music
Music
Mythology
Nautical
Nuclear
Nuclear Physics
Numerical Control
Numismatics
Nutrition
Oil And Gas
Optics
Optoelectronics
Order Picking
Packaging Industry
Paper Industry
Parliament
Patents
Pharmaceuticals
Philosophy
Photography
Physical Therapy
Physics
Politics
Polymers
Popular Culture
Precious Metals
Printing and Paper Industry
Process Engineering
Procurement > CPV (Common Procurement Vocabulary)
Psychiatry
Psychology
Publishing Industry
Quality Assurance
Radio Technology
Railways
Religion
Safety
Science
Securities
Sewage
Shipping Industry
Social Sciences
Society
Sociology
Software
Software Engineering
Spatial Planning
Sports
Statistics
Tax
Taxonomy
Technology Industry
Telecom
Television
Textile Industry
Tourism
Traffic
Traffic Engineering
Trains
Trams
Translation
Transport
Urban Planning
Welding
Wood Industry
Zoology


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xxxrjlChile
Local time: 12:55
UNESCO Nomenclature Sep 15, 2012

The UNESCO Nomenclature for Fields of Science and Technology dates back to 1988 and was an attempt to do what you're trying to do. A key difference is that UNESCO quite likely has a bigger budget than you.

Somewhere in the pile of boxes full of unread unloved books sitting in my garden shed there is a copy of the 1st 'properly published' multilingual edition, dated, if I recall correctly, around 1992. It resembles the phone directory of a city of a million inhabitants, in terms of size, weight and readability.

Suggestion: think small.


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Michael Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:55
Member (2009)
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a formidable task, either way you go about it (short and concise or ‘unabridged’) Sep 15, 2012

Sweet Jesus! I can only imagine what that multilingual edition of the UNESCO Nomenclature must look like.

Instead of reinventing the wheel, I had a quick look at Proz.com's 'General and Specific Fields' and how Graham P. Oxtoby did it in his Comprehensive Dictionary of Industry & Technology and just made a selection from theirs. I keep meaning to have a proper look at it again, but I never seem to get around to it. The longer I wait though and use it for entering terms into my glossaries in memoQ, the messier things are going to get. There's nothing worse than deciding on a particular domain or subject, using it, and then changing your mind a year later in your terminology management tool...

Michael

PS: You might also want to have a look at TranslatorsCafé's list of 'specializations': http://www.translatorscafe.com/tcTerms/EN/thSearch.aspx (there is also a 'specialization hierarchy' which you can access by clicking on the little brown icon to the right of the Specialization drop-down menu)

[Edited at 2012-09-15 21:57 GMT]


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Emma Goldsmith  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 17:55
Member (2010)
Spanish to English
Standard? Sep 16, 2012

As Soonthon says, it's something you need to customise yourself, in your own field.

I classify my domains by body system (respiratory, genito-urinary, reproductive, etc.) and by type of document (Informed Consent Form, Summary of Product Characteristics, Package Leaflet, Adverse Drug Reaction, Back Translation, etc.) so you can see that unless you're a medical translator, this won't be any help at all.

I also use a free text field for adding names of clients with whom I work very sporadically and so they don't have their own TM assigned to them.

Emma


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lprd027
Local time: 03:55
German to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for your feedback & suggestions Sep 17, 2012

Thanks to all who responded. I am looking for high-level classifications, in order to tag my TM segments, as well as my terminology database entries. During translation, this enables filters to be applied, so that only the most "relevant" matches a found. I am surprised there isn't some LISA, ANSI, DIN or whatever standard for this.

Michael, I will probably use your list as a starting point, and work from that. Naturally, I will also check out the other suggestions.


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Michael Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:55
Member (2009)
Dutch to English
+ ...
TC’s hierarchical and unordered list of ‘Specializations’ Sep 17, 2012

Because I have nothing better to do with my time, I extracted TranslatorsCafé's list of 'Specializations', including their hierarchical list:

•• Hierarchical list:

1 Technology & Engineering, Natural & Applied Sciences

1.1 Computers, Software and Data Processing

1.1.1 Computer and Information Sciences
1.1.2 Computer Engineering
1.1.3 Data Communications
1.1.4 Data Processing
1.1.5 Information Sciences and Systems
1.1.6 Internet
1.1.7 Software Engineering

1.2 Applied Sciences, Technology and Engineering. Communication, Computers, Chemical Industry, Manufacturing, Military Science, Naval Science, Transport

1.2.1 Aerospace Engineering
1.2.2 Aircraft
1.2.3 Automotive
1.2.4 Aviation
1.2.5 Bioengineering and Biomedical Engineering
1.2.6 Biotechnology
1.2.7 Buildings
1.2.8 Chemical Technology and Related Industries
1.2.9 Civil Engineering
1.2.10 Electrical Engineering
1.2.11 Engineering
1.2.12 Fibre, Textile and Weaving
1.2.13 Fire Protection
1.2.14 Heating, Air Condition and Refrigeration
1.2.15 Manufacturing (Metal Working and Products, Instruments, Furniture, Printing, Clothing, etc.)
1.2.16 Mechanical Engineering
1.2.17 Metallurgical Engineering
1.2.18 Military Technologies
1.2.19 Mining and Mineral Engineering
1.2.20 Mining and Petroleum Technology
1.2.21 Naval Architecture And Marine Engineering
1.2.22 Nuclear Engineering
1.2.23 Oil and Gas Engineering
1.2.24 Petroleum Engineering
1.2.25 Radio and Television Broadcasting
1.2.26 Telecommunications
1.2.27 Textile Sciences and Engineering
1.2.28 Transportation

1.3 Agriculture, Fisheries, Farming, Food Industry, Forestry, Housekeeping and Hospitality, Stockbreeding, Wildlife Exploration

1.3.1 Agriculture
1.3.2 Agronomy and Crop Science
1.3.3 Animal Sciences
1.3.4 Aquaculture
1.3.5 Culinary Arts
1.3.6 Fishing and Fisheries Sciences
1.3.7 Food Sciences
1.3.8 Forestry
1.3.8 Hospitality
1.3.9 Tourism and Travel

1.4 Medicine, Health

1.4.1 Gerontology
1.4.2 Health
1.4.3 Medicine (General)
1.4.4 Medicine — Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine
1.4.5 Medicine — Dentistry
1.4.6 Medicine — Medical Technology
1.4.7 Medicine — Microbiology and Bacteriology
1.4.8 Medicine — Neuroscience
1.4.9 Medicine — Nursing
1.4.10 Medicine — Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene
1.4.11 Medicine — Ophthalmology
1.4.12 Medicine — Pharmacology
1.4.13 Medicine — Psychiatry
1.4.14 Medicine — Public Health Education and Promotion
1.4.15 Medicine — Social Psychology
1.4.16 Medicine — Toxicology
1.4.16 Physical Education Teaching and Coaching
1.4.17 Sport and Fitness
1.4.18 Veterinary

1.5 Mathematics and Natural Sciences: Astronomy, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Geology, Meteorology, Physics, Zoology

1.5.1 Anatomy
1.5.2 Applied Mathematics
1.5.3 Astronomy
1.5.4 Astrophysics
1.5.5 Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology
1.5.6 Biochemistry
1.5.7 Biology
1.5.8 Biomedical
1.5.9 Biometrics
1.5.10 Biophysics
1.5.11 Biopsychology
1.5.12 Biostatistics
1.5.13 Botany
1.5.14 Cartography
1.5.15 Chemistry
1.5.16 Ecology
1.5.17 Entomology
1.5.18 Environmental Science
1.5.19 Genetics
1.5.20 Geochemistry
1.5.21 Geology
1.5.22 Geophysics and Seismology
1.5.23 Marine and Aquatic Biology
1.5.24 Mathematics
1.5.25 Molecular Biology
1.5.26 Oceanography
1.5.27 Optics
1.5.28 Organic Chemistry
1.5.29 Petrochemistry
1.5.30 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
1.5.31 Physics
1.5.32 Polymer Chemistry
1.5.33 Radiation Biology
1.5.34 Theoretical and Mathematical Physics
1.5.35 Zoology

2 Philosophy & Psychology, Religion & Social Sciences, Arts & Literature, Geography & History, Law

2.1 Social Sciences, Accounting, Business, Economics, Education, Finance, Government, Law, Political Science

2.1.1 Advertising
2.1.2 Banking and Financial
2.1.3 Business Administration and Management
2.1.4 Business General
2.1.5 Business Marketing
2.1.6 Child Care
2.1.7 Criminology
2.1.8 Economics
2.1.9 Education
2.1.10 Entrepreneurship
2.1.11 Ethnic and Cultural Studies
2.1.12 Finance
2.1.13 Forensic Science
2.1.14 Humanities and Humanistic Studies
2.1.15 Law and Legal
2.1.16 Patent Translation
2.1.17 Political Science
2.1.18 Sociology
2.1.19 Taxation
2.1.20 Women Studies

2.2 Generalities, Anthropology, Archaeology, Geography, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Religion, Theology

2.2.1 Anthropology
2.2.2 Archaeology
2.2.3 Bible and Biblical Studies
2.2.4 Geography
2.2.5 History
2.2.6 Islamic Studies
2.2.7 Medieval and Renaissance Studies
2.2.8 Philosophy
2.2.9 Psychology
2.2.10 Religion
2.2.11 Religion and Religious Studies
2.2.12 Theology and Theological Studies

2.3 Arts, Music, Language, Linguistics, Literature, Recreation, Entertainment, Architecture, Photography, Cinematography

2.3.1 Acting and Directing
2.3.2 Architecture
2.3.3 Art
2.3.4 Broadcast Journalism
2.3.5 Ceramics Arts and Ceramics
2.3.6 Computer Games and Gambling, Electronic Games, Games of Chance
2.3.7 Design and Applied Arts
2.3.8 Desktop Publishing (DTP)
2.3.9 Film and Cinema Studies
2.3.10 Genealogy/Family History Research
2.3.11 Journalism and Mass Communication
2.3.12 Linguistics
2.3.13 Literature
2.3.14 Music
2.3.15 Music History and Literature
2.3.16 Photographic Arts
2.3.17 Photography
2.3.18 Theatre
2.3.19 Visual and Performing Arts

General
Science (General)


•• Unordered list:

Acting and Directing
Advertising
Aerospace Engineering
Agriculture
Agronomy and Crop Science
Aircraft
Anatomy
Animal Sciences
Anthropology
Applied Mathematics
Aquaculture
Archaeology
Architecture
Art
Astronomy
Astrophysics
Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology
Automotive
Aviation
Banking and Financial
Bible and Biblical Studies
Biochemist
Biochemistry
Bioengineering and Biomedical Engineering
Biology
Biomedical
Biometrics
Biophysics
Biopsychology
Biostatistics
Biotechnology
Botany
Broadcast Journalism
Buildings
Business Administration and Management
Business General
Business Marketing
Cartography
Ceramics Arts and Ceramics
Chemical Technology and Related Industries
Chemistry
Child Care
Civil Engineering
Computer and Information Sciences
Computer Engineering
Computer Games and Gambling, Electronic Games, Games of Chance
Criminology
Culinary Arts
Data Communications
Data Processing
Design and Applied Arts
Desktop Publishing (DTP)
Ecology
Economics
Education
Electrical Engineering
Engineering
Entomology
Entrepreneurship
Environmental Science
Ethnic and Cultural Studies
Fibre, Textile and Weaving
Film and Cinema Studies
Finance
Fire Protection
Fishing and Fisheries Sciences
Food Sciences
Forensic Science
Forestry
Genealogy/Family History Research
General
Genetics
Geochemistry
Geography
Geology
Geophysics and Seismology
Gerontology
Health
Heating, Air Condition and Refrigeration
History
Hospitality
Humanities and Humanistic Studies
Information Sciences and Systems
Internet
Islamic Studies
Journalism and Mass Communication
Law and Legal
Linguistics
Literature
Manufacturing (Metal Working and Products, Instruments, Furniture, Printing, Clothing, etc.)
Marine and Aquatic Biology
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Medicine — Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine
Medicine — Dentistry
Medicine — Medical Technology
Medicine — Microbiology and Bacteriology
Medicine — Neuroscience
Medicine — Nursing
Medicine — Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene
Medicine — Ophthalmology
Medicine — Pharmacolc
Medicine — Pharmacology
Medicine — Psychiatry
Medicine — Public Health Education and Promotion
Medicine — Social Psychology
Medicine — Toxicology
Medicine (General)
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Metallurgical Engineering
Military Technologies
Mining and Mineral Engineering
Mining and Petroleum Technology
Molecular Biology
Music
Music History and Literature
Naval Architecture And Marine Engineering
Nuclear Engineering
Oceanography
Oil and Gas Engineering
Optics
Organic Chemistry
Patent Translation
Petrochemistry
Petroleum Engineering
Philosophy
Photographic Arts
Photography
Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
Physical Education Teaching and Coaching
Physics
Political Science
Polymer Chemistry
Psychology
Radiation Biology
Radio and Television Broadcasting
Religion
Religion and Religious Studies
Science (General)
Sociology
Software Engineering
Sport and Fitness
Taxation
Telecommunications
Textile Sciences and Engineering
Theatre
Theology and Theological Studies
Theoretical and Mathematical Physics
Tourism and Travel
Transportation
Veterinary
Visual and Performing Arts
Women Studies
Zoology


I would be interested to hear if anyone ends up creating their own list/hierarchy!

Michael


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 17:55
Member (2003)
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I suggest you make better use of your time! Sep 17, 2012

Way back in the days when I was a student librarian and libraries had manual index cards... corresponding to physical books on physical shelves...

Readers and librarians had to know how to walk to the right shelf to find what they were looking for without wasting a lot of time. Bookshops still do it today, and it is practical enough for hard-copy documents.

We talked about facets and fragmentation and other topics, and about optimising the effort - spending a lot of time categorising details that might never be searched for was obviously a waste of time. Alphabetical sorting was fast and often good enough.

For things that were needed frequently, we used thesauri and allocated terms and index numbers and studied Dewey's principles and a system called UDC (Universal Decimal Classification). Its pros and cons and where to find possible models in different subject areas where some of the work was already done...

No matter how complete the list, somebody could always find another subsection or side-subject that you had not included, or a document that belonged in at least three categories.

In the meantime the boffins (as we called them then) were playing with computers, since by then every self-respecting university had one. Big firms were beginning to invest in computers too... So we had to learn about them. It took me ages to write a program that slowly printed out 100 document titles in an alphabetical list, and I was not amused.

And then someone found that computers could be connected to TV screens, so we did not need punch cards or ticker-tape. Steve Jobs, Billy Gates and all the others even made computers that were so simple to operate that soon they were popping up in offices and libraries all over the civilised world.

Others linked them to servers and linked the servers together, and then dropped the simple terminals, so that everyone could have a real, high-powered machine on their desktop. With the Internet, the possibilities took another quantum leap.

OK, now you can have a whole library on your desktop as well as vast remote resources, and it does take a little organisation.
But today search engines and CATS can find almost anything in an instant.

It is actually a waste of time to categorise too finely, because they can find what you are looking for faster than you can type in a pathway to tell them where to search!

Over the last 10-12 years, I have had less and less guilty conscience about the totally unstructured way I stored terminology and other information in the 'stacks' on my computer.
When I had to have most of it on floppy disk, I did make an effort to number them and keep a printed list of what was on each.

But now I can use Windows Explore and find a single phrase or term in my yellow terminology folder, and Trados Studio searches all the TMs I select in the twinkling of an eye. It takes longer to select the tiny subject or project-specific TMs than the big, unsorted ones.

I merged all my TMs to create an AutoSuggest dictionary, and if I add that TM to a project, then in five seconds either AutoSuggest or the Concordance can find almost anything that is in the TM at all.

There are good reasons for tagging your segments, like client confidentiality and different contexts, but I cannot imagine that the effort required to sort them by subject - other than VERY roughly - will ever save you time later.

I learned a lot of other things at library school that are still useful today, but I have forgotten almost all about classifications of that kind.



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Piotr Bienkowski  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 17:55
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English to Polish
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Numerical codes? Dec 4, 2015

One of my regular clients actually uses numerical codes for domains and subjects of their jobs. For example the current one I am working on has domain 500 and subject 599. When I asked them some time ago about these numbers the response was that it is their in-house thing. I actually think that they did not develop the coding themselves, but copied it from somewhere. So, where do you think it comes from?

[Edited at 2015-12-04 21:17 GMT]


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Michael Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:55
Member (2009)
Dutch to English
+ ...
DVX? Dec 4, 2015

Piotr Bienkowski wrote:

One of my regular clients actually uses numerical codes for domains and subjects of their jobs. For example the current one I am working on has domain 500 and subject 599. When I asked them some time ago about these numbers the response was that it is their in-house thing. I actually think that they did not develop the coding themselves, but copied it from somewhere. So, where do you think it comes from?

[Edited at 2015-12-04 21:17 GMT]


Doesn't DVX use number codes (along with names)?

Michael


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Oliver Walter  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:55
Member (2005)
German to English
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That UNESCO list Dec 4, 2015

Today (about 3 years late!) I've had a look at that UNESCO list.
It is a PDF file, about 1.2 MB in size, containing 19 pages, with the actual list of names of areas of science occupying 17 and a half pages (pp 2-19).
The page contents are graphical (i.e. images), with no extractable text, and I estimate it has a total of about 1900 science areas - probably much too detailed for practical use as TM subjects. The quality of the graphics is probably too poor for OCR to be of much use.

The top 2 levels of subject-area headings may be of interest for this purpose. e.g. at the top level:
11 Logic, 12 Mathematics, 21 Astronomy and Astrophysics - - - 63 Sociology, 71 Ethics, 72 Philosophy.
At the 2nd level:
1103 Deductive logic, 1203 Computer sciences, 1201 Algebra, 1204 Geometry, 2406 Biophysics.

The actual detailed subject areas are the 3rd level (e.g. Boolean algebra, Hybrid computing, Solar physics, Fused salts, Human anatomy. Pharmacodynamics).
If you want to estimate how many titles there are at each level, download your copy, count the relevant titles on one or two of the pages 2 to 18 and multiply by 17.5 (if you counted 1 page) or 8.7 (if you counted 2 pages to get a slightly more accurate estimate. I haven't done that!)

I would guess these details at the third level are of interest to librarians like Christine (of some years ago) but translators are more likely to be interested in the first or second level.
Michael's list, from TC might be more useful.
I've just discovered: there is (unsurprisingly) some information about this nomenclature in Wikipedia, e.g.:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6-digit_UNESCO_nomenclature


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Michael Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:55
Member (2009)
Dutch to English
+ ...
I've got that PDF too, but in mine the text is editable/selectable. Dec 4, 2015

Oliver Walter wrote:

Today (about 3 years late!) I've had a look at that UNESCO list.
It is a PDF file, about 1.2 MB in size, containing 19 pages, with the actual list of names of areas of science occupying 17 and a half pages (pp 2-19).
The page contents are graphical (i.e. images), with no extractable text, and I estimate it has a total of about 1900 science areas - probably much too detailed for practical use as TM subjects. The quality of the graphics is probably too poor for OCR to be of much use.

The top 2 levels of subject-area headings may be of interest for this purpose. e.g. at the top level:
11 Logic, 12 Mathematics, 21 Astronomy and Astrophysics - - - 63 Sociology, 71 Ethics, 72 Philosophy.
At the 2nd level:
1103 Deductive logic, 1203 Computer sciences, 1201 Algebra, 1204 Geometry, 2406 Biophysics.

The actual detailed subject areas are the 3rd level (e.g. Boolean algebra, Hybrid computing, Solar physics, Fused salts, Human anatomy. Pharmacodynamics).
If you want to estimate how many titles there are at each level, download your copy, count the relevant titles on one or two of the pages 2 to 18 and multiply by 17.5 (if you counted 1 page) or 8.7 (if you counted 2 pages to get a slightly more accurate estimate. I haven't done that!)

I would guess these details at the third level are of interest to librarians like Christine (of some years ago) but translators are more likely to be interested in the first or second level.
Michael's list, from TC might be more useful.
I've just discovered: there is (unsurprisingly) some information about this nomenclature in Wikipedia, e.g.:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6-digit_UNESCO_nomenclature



I uploaded it to my server (just in case mine is different):

http://beijer.uk/content/UNESCO-Science-Code.pdf



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Meta Arkadia
Local time: 22:55
English to Indonesian
+ ...
I gave up Dec 5, 2015

When I started using a CAT tool in 1997, I obediently followed the manual (some CAT tools come with a manual), and assigned client and subject to my resources. In those days, you could only connect to 1 TM, 1 termbase, and 1 lexicon/glossary in DejaVu, and I'm pretty sure you couldn't use more resources in other tools. The subject drop-down list looked like this:



It's both too comprehensive and too limited since most jobs I do require more than one subject. Like: General, automotive, marketing. Or: General, automative, workplace. Worse: General, automotive, workplace, ACME, series FooBar. I gave up. All subjects became "General." And I wasn't the only one. Like most DV users, I switched to the Big Mama (general TM), Big Papa (general termbase), and lexicon (project specific glossary) approach. The lexicons could grow from project specific to subject specific, and by that, rather useless as project specific.

More than 10 years later, it became possible to connect to more resources in your CAT tool. I developed a rather sophisticated approach with almost unlimited resources and settings. It works. If you know what resources to use, and I'm pretty sure using a classification system like the ones proposed here, won't work.

So earlier this year, I decided to import all my old lexicons, client termbases, and downloaded stuff (like Michael's glossaries) in an indexed database, arguing that I would be able to easily find the resources I needed, and I even intended write a script to search for them automatically by creating a wordlist from the source document. I gave up. There turned out to be more columns needed than I provided for, or wanted to create.

So I went back to good old desktop search, one for less frequently used, extremely big, or "unidentified" resources.



I can access it from within my CAT tool, and if I have to search it regularly, and if it turns out I often get the hits from the same resource, I can add that resource in the CAT tool for automatic search and auto-assembling.

I don't think "mere translators" can create and maintain a useful (standard) classification system, unless you are highly specialised. And in that case, you hardly need a classification system.

Cheers.

Hans


[Edited at 2015-12-05 00:56 GMT]


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