Optimum charge for EN into Baltic languages for Chinese clients
Thread poster: MariusV

MariusV  Identity Verified
Lithuania
Local time: 11:45
English to Lithuanian
+ ...
Jun 23, 2009

Hello,

First of all, sorry for not posting this in Chinese (do not know the language, but hope to learn it some time in the future. Secondly, well, this subject could also go to "Money Matters". But why I posted it here - I'd need some advice of folks working in China on the following:

1) what do you think would be the "optimum charge" (not too much as to receive orders but not too little as not to be underpaid) for clients from China for English into Lithuanian, Latvian, and Estonian per source word for the "most usual stuff" like various electronic equipment/household appliaances manuals and like with the client being a Chinese translation agency?

2) can I try approaching the "end clients" (i.e. producers) of electronic equipment stuff (not agencies) with only 3 language combinations (mentioned above), or shall I have the whole bunch of the EU languages (or, at least, the greater majority of the EU langs) for being able to propose services for the "end clients" in China? and also - would/should the rates be also different and if yes, how much?

I plan some promo and trying to enter the Chinese translation market with my langs, and would appreciate any advice, info and help on the issue. Thank you in advance, dear colleagues.


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chica nueva
Local time: 20:45
Chinese to English
a working partnership? Jun 23, 2009

Hello Marius

You are an agency right? It sounds as if you would like to enter the Chinese market, right? and translate Ch->En->Baltic languages.

Are you looking for a Chinese agent/partner for collaboration? I think this is how it might work in the freight-forwarding industry - I'm not sure about translation.

See what happens. Have you considered working with a Singapore or HK-based firm.

Perhaps I have the wrong idea. Can you clarify?

Lesley


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lbone  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 16:45
English to Chinese
+ ...
My cents Jun 23, 2009

To be honest, there is little demand for these pairs in China.

More than half of the local agencies declare they can manage to translate in ANY language pairs (but obviously they do not actually have all the reliable resources). If Chinese clients want to translate into Baltic languages, they may first look for Chinese to Baltic languages translators. The typical rates might be $0.025-0.06 per source word in the Chinese market, but I don't believe they can get professional translations at this rate level. However, who can prove whether a translation is a good one? If no one can tell or prove, translators/agencies with lower quotes may gain priority.

For the pairs English to Baltic languages, I guess the demands may most possibly come from local agencies or foreigners in China. For local agencies, I guess the MAXIMUM rate they can accept is about $0.05-0.09 per source word; the "proper" ones might be $0.03-0.06, depending on many factors. For foreigners in China, I guess you may know them better than I do.


[Edited at 2009-06-23 17:57 GMT]


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chica nueva
Local time: 20:45
Chinese to English
approaching the "end clients" (i.e. producers) of electronic equipment/household appliances directly Jul 2, 2009

MariusV wrote:

Hello,
...
2) can I try approaching the "end clients" (i.e. producers) of electronic equipment stuff (not agencies) with only 3 language combinations (mentioned above), or shall I have the whole bunch of the EU languages (or, at least, the greater majority of the EU langs) for being able to propose services for the "end clients" in China? and also - would/should the rates be also different and if yes, how much?
...


Hello Marius

Have you considered approaching Chinese manufacturers like Hai'er directly? That's one I can think of. There may be others.

'would/should the rates be different' - I'm not sure what you mean by this. Oh, you mean different for Chinese 'direct clients' than for Chinese 'agencies', is that right?

Lesley


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MariusV  Identity Verified
Lithuania
Local time: 11:45
English to Lithuanian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
thank you for your info Jul 2, 2009

lbone wrote:

To be honest, there is little demand for these pairs in China.

More than half of the local agencies declare they can manage to translate in ANY language pairs (but obviously they do not actually have all the reliable resources). If Chinese clients want to translate into Baltic languages, they may first look for Chinese to Baltic languages translators. The typical rates might be $0.025-0.06 per source word in the Chinese market, but I don't believe they can get professional translations at this rate level. However, who can prove whether a translation is a good one? If no one can tell or prove, translators/agencies with lower quotes may gain priority.

For the pairs English to Baltic languages, I guess the demands may most possibly come from local agencies or foreigners in China. For local agencies, I guess the MAXIMUM rate they can accept is about $0.05-0.09 per source word; the "proper" ones might be $0.03-0.06, depending on many factors. For foreigners in China, I guess you may know them better than I do.


[Edited at 2009-06-23 17:57 GMT]


Dear "lbone" - thank you for your info. As for direct translation from Chinese into Lithuanian, for example, I do not think they will find anyone at all. So far, boiling in this juice for many years, I do not know any translator able to do that (apart from some people who learned some Chinese just for their own interest). What remains then? Only English or some other major languages into Baltic languages. My view is that, e.g. if a Chinese producer makes a product, they, willing to export it to the EU market, need manuals of this product in all EU languages, so in any case, they will need it in English and FROM English they might translate into the other remaining languages.

Now the two major points of my interest:

1. Are rates from direct (end) clients are much higher that from Chinese agencies...I see that there is no big substantial difference as it seems that Chinese agencies work on a rather small profit margin (at least based on your figures).
2. Another point - even if the end client is interested in the Baltic languages, I guess that ONLY Baltic languages will not suffice their needs - they'd need to translate the material into ALL EU languages (will it make sense to hire someone for 3-4 language pairs and to hire someone else for the remaining ~ 20 languages)? Being the end client, I'd order all at a go at the agency and would not bother about translation project management (this is what agencies are for)...

Based on my philosophies, do you think it is worth even bothering with these couple of languuage pairs for direct/end clients even putting aside the issue of rates/prices??


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MariusV  Identity Verified
Lithuania
Local time: 11:45
English to Lithuanian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Where to find more Jul 2, 2009

lai an wrote:

MariusV wrote:

Hello,
...
2) can I try approaching the "end clients" (i.e. producers) of electronic equipment stuff (not agencies) with only 3 language combinations (mentioned above), or shall I have the whole bunch of the EU languages (or, at least, the greater majority of the EU langs) for being able to propose services for the "end clients" in China? and also - would/should the rates be also different and if yes, how much?
...


Hello Marius

Have you considered approaching Chinese manufacturers like Hai'er directly? That's one I can think of. There may be others.

'would/should the rates be different' - I'm not sure what you mean by this. Oh, you mean different for Chinese 'direct clients' than for Chinese 'agencies', is that right?

Lesley


Dear Lesley,

Are there any www or other good Internet resources where I can find good lists of Chinese manufacturers?

Thanks in advance.

Marius


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lbone  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 16:45
English to Chinese
+ ...
end clients Jul 3, 2009

MariusV wrote:

Dear "lbone" - thank you for your info. As for direct translation from Chinese into Lithuanian, for example, I do not think they will find anyone at all. So far, boiling in this juice for many years, I do not know any translator able to do that (apart from some people who learned some Chinese just for their own interest). What remains then? Only English or some other major languages into Baltic languages. My view is that, e.g. if a Chinese producer makes a product, they, willing to export it to the EU market, need manuals of this product in all EU languages, so in any case, they will need it in English and FROM English they might translate into the other remaining languages.

Now the two major points of my interest:

1. Are rates from direct (end) clients are much higher that from Chinese agencies...I see that there is no big substantial difference as it seems that Chinese agencies work on a rather small profit margin (at least based on your figures).


They usually do not live on these pairs, so they may not care about the profit margins in these pairs. Some Chinese students living in Europe may do such translations at low rates. You may say their translations are not qualified, but at least they are translations and it's hard to prove translations by someone else are better or more valuable.

It is possible to get higher rates from SOME end clients in China if
1) They really need professional translations in these pairs and their losses will be much higher otherwise.
2) You can prove your translations are or will be professional/qualified.
3) You can prove/make them believe that they cannot get the same level of work easily at obviously lower rates.
4) They have funds for that, or you can persuade them to fund for that.

I have verified the above rules by myself. However, working for high-rate clients is not always cost-effective.

Besides, you need channels to establish yourself. I cannot help you on that, because channels usually do not come free.

2. Another point - even if the end client is interested in the Baltic languages, I guess that ONLY Baltic languages will not suffice their needs - they'd need to translate the material into ALL EU languages (will it make sense to hire someone for 3-4 language pairs and to hire someone else for the remaining ~ 20 languages)? Being the end client, I'd order all at a go at the agency and would not bother about translation project management (this is what agencies are for)...

Based on my philosophies, do you think it is worth even bothering with these couple of languuage pairs for direct/end clients even putting aside the issue of rates/prices??



I have no answers. Other colleagues may have some ideas.

[Edited at 2009-07-03 04:52 GMT]


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chica nueva
Local time: 20:45
Chinese to English
Lists of Chinese consumer electronics manufacturers - Mainland China Jul 3, 2009

MariusV wrote:

Dear Lesley,

Are there any www or other good Internet resources where I can find good lists of Chinese manufacturers?

Thanks in advance.

Marius



Hello Marius

Some information. Hope it helps.

Lesley

1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_companies_in_Mainland_China
2 After Lenovo and Haier, there are electronics manufacturer BOE, home appliance maker TCL, and telecommunications equipment supplier Huawei, ...
http://www1.cei.gov.cn/ce/doc/cenl/200606052711.htm
Lenovo ranks 1st and Haier ranks 2nd in China 2006 Top IT 100
3 consumer electronics companies: Haier, Hisense, Changhong, TCL, Lenovo, Great Wall, Tsinghwa Tongfang, BOE, Konka, Desay (Google)


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chica nueva
Local time: 20:45
Chinese to English
More about globalised and globalising Chinese manufacturers ... Jul 8, 2009

lai an wrote:
3 consumer electronics companies: Haier, Hisense, Changhong, TCL, Lenovo, Great Wall, Tsinghwa Tongfang, BOE, Konka, Desay (Google)


Hello again Marius. These 10 consumer electronics companies are looking to develop external markets (see link below). The two articles below may also be of interest. (The second discusses the two different corporate cultures and styles of Haier and Lenovo). Lesley

1 http://english.people.com.cn/90001/90776/90882/6557062.html
Haier and Lenovo rank among "China's Most Valuable Brands" December 18, 2008 (People's Daily On-Line)

2 ...The next wave of Chinese companies eyeing M&As overseas ... include entities such as China International Marine Containers, Shanghai Zenhua Port Machinery and Zhujiang (Pearl River) Piano. ... http://knowledge.smu.edu.sg/article.cfm?articleid=1159 Going Global Poses New Challenges for Chinese Companies, September 02, 2008

[ Link for the above list of 10 consumer electronics companies:
http://74.125.155.132/search?q=cache:NoPvEKG7zPMJ:www.twicechina.com/download/documents/Leading%20Brands%20of%20China%20Consumer%20Electronics%20highlight%20CES.doc%20haier%20lenovo%20global&cd=9&hl=en&ct=clnk
Leading Brands of China Consumer Electronics highlight CES : Ascending the brilliant stage to aim at overseas market (Jan. 9, 2009) ]


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chica nueva
Local time: 20:45
Chinese to English
Why China Can't Create Brands | Newsweek Business | Newsweek.com Jul 27, 2009

Hello again Marius. Perhaps this article might be of interest:

... During a Guangdong road trip in April, Wen called the crisis an opportunity for Chinese firms to innovate and expand abroad. Beijing has ordered state banks to make tens of billions of dollars in loans available to firms eyeing the global market. ... http://www.newsweek.com/id/207381 Generic Giants: China is the world's factory, but its top firms remain oddly anonymous.

[Edited at 2009-07-27 12:46 GMT]


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