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单词请赐教
Thread poster: clearwater

clearwater
China
Local time: 20:17
English to Chinese
Jun 26, 2014

"Consumers, like employees, can only handle {one adjacency} at a time. No more. I can't learn two things at once," says Todd Ablowitz, a payments consultant who is president of Double Diamond Group. "If you give people too much too soon, they can't handle it. The consumer will give you more if you give them more time, provided you're giving them something that they value."
试译:
托德•阿布洛威茨是咨询公司双钻集团(Double Diamond Group)的总裁,也是名支付顾问。他说:“与员工一样,消费者每次只能处理{一种行为模式},更多的模式就处理不了。人们没法同时学习两样东西。要是你一下子将太多东西强加给人家头上,对方就处理不了。如果你给消费者更多的时间,消费者会给你更多的回报,前提是你所给的是他们看重的东西。”

查了老半天,仍是对adjacency觉得费解:似乎是邻接关系,但这样翻译的话,让人看不懂。不知在商业或社科领域,这个单词是不是有特殊的意思?会不会是个专业术语?

文章介绍了星巴克采用了go-slow(循序渐进)的手法,让广大顾客逐渐接触其移动支付模式。

源自:http://www.proz.com/kudoz/english_to_chinese/it_information_technology/5593288-adjacency.html


 

Phil Hand  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 20:17
Chinese to English
adjacency 是把已有的品牌延伸到邻近的(adjacent)或相关的市场板块 Jun 26, 2014

http://www.strategy-business.com/blog/How-IKEA-Disney-and-Berkshire-Hathaway-Succeed-with-Adjacencies?gko=fa07c

IKEA identifies itself with a mission to provide well-designed products at a lower price than anyone else can offer. And now it’s selling televisions. Is this the typical adjacencies thinking? “Hey, if our customers are buying furniture, they might also be in the market for TVs.

http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/the-paradox-of-adjacency-expansion.aspx
Selling highly related products to customers you know well is one of the most successful adjacency moves.

Consider Olam International, launched in 1989 as an exporter of Nigerian cashews...Through repeated adjacency moves into other producing countries such as Ghana and Cameroon, Olam rapidly became a leading supplier of cocoa beans and products.

http://marakon.com/images/uploads/documents/Marakon-Commentary-Entry-Into-Adjacent-Businesses_vf.pdf
Adjacencies are new business areas that most often build from a company’s established assets.


Consumers, like employees, can only handle {one adjacency} at a time. No more. I can't learn two things at once,
消费者与员工一样,只能接受品牌一时做一种延伸,不能更多,他们不能同时消化两种新概念。

[Edited at 2014-06-26 02:57 GMT]


 

clearwater
China
Local time: 20:17
English to Chinese
TOPIC STARTER
另一层担心 Jun 26, 2014

谢谢Phil!
新的疑惑又来了:
这里的adjacency是不是果真与您提供的链接中出现的adjacency是同一个意思或用法?怕就怕one adjacency中的adjacency是另一层意思。
因为我这篇文章中就出现了这一处adjacency,而不是作者着重描述或介绍的。
从我翻译的这篇文章:http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9245392/Evan_Schuman_Starbucks_and_the_art_of_persuasion?taxonomyId=133来看,似乎不是您所提供链接的那层意思。


 

wherestip  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:17
Chinese to English
+ ...
循序渐进 Jun 26, 2014

clearwater wrote:

文章介绍了星巴克采用了go-slow(循序渐进)的手法,让广大顾客逐渐接触其移动支付模式。



clearwater,

You've got it. "循序渐进" is exactly the meaning of "adjacency" in this context. Instead of "revolutionary", the approach taken by Starbucks on the technology front was "evolutionary". Think of it this way: on the road of evolution, every step of progress is related and adjacent to the previous step.

In this article, rather than referring to the gradual expansion "OF" Starbucks' product offering per se, the word "adjacency" refers to the gradual migration in technology(IT) used "IN" their product offering. The concept is basically the same.

As to what Chinese term you use to express this concept of 循序渐进, it's entirely up to you. I think Phil's suggestion of 延伸 is a pretty good choice of words.


 

clearwater
China
Local time: 20:17
English to Chinese
TOPIC STARTER
谢谢! Jun 26, 2014

谢谢Steven!
在您和Phil的基础上,我再试一下:
托德•阿布洛威茨(Todd Ablowitz)是咨询公司双钻集团(Double Diamond Group)的总裁,也是名支付顾问。他说:“与员工一样,消费者每次只能接受一次循序渐进的变化,更多的变化就接受不了。人们没法同时适应两种变化。要是你一下子将太多东西强加给顾客头上,对方就接受不了。如果你给消费者更多的时间,消费者会给你更多的回报,前提是你所给的是他们看重的东西。”


 

wherestip  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:17
Chinese to English
+ ...
循序渐进 Jun 26, 2014

clearwater wrote:

谢谢Steven!
在您和Phil的基础上,我再试一下:
托德•阿布洛威茨(Todd Ablowitz)是咨询公司双钻集团(Double Diamond Group)的总裁,也是名支付顾问。他说:“与员工一样,消费者每次只能接受一次循序渐进的变化,更多的变化就接受不了。人们没法同时适应两种变化。要是你一下子将太多东西强加给顾客头上,对方就接受不了。如果你给消费者更多的时间,消费者会给你更多的回报,前提是你所给的是他们看重的东西。”


I think that's great.icon_smile.gif


 

Phil Hand  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 20:17
Chinese to English
达? Jun 26, 2014

clearwater wrote:

托德•阿布洛威茨(Todd Ablowitz)是咨询公司双钻集团(Double Diamond Group)的总裁,也是名支付顾问。他说:“与员工一样,消费者每次只能接受一次循序渐进的变化,更多的变化就接受不了。人们没法同时适应两种变化。要是你一下子将太多东西强加给顾客头上,对方就接受不了。如果你给消费者更多的时间,消费者会给你更多的回报,前提是你所给的是他们看重的东西。”

造词是可以的,但还是要提醒一下:原文很好理解。由此,译文应该形成一目了然的白文,轻轻松松地把意思传达给读者。恐怕,看这个译文的读者疑问重重:每次什么?每次消费吗?什么是循序渐进?循什么序?这里的员工和消费者是什么关系的?
原文的很多细节让我们知道其意思。比如说,Ablowitz的职称,payments consultant,这种工作是帮助零售公司引进新的支付技术和相关的配套系统等。因为他是consultant,我知道他的工作就是帮公司适应于新的事情,之所以才会说“like employees”,因为众所周知的常识就是不要要求员工一下子学太多新知识,会乱的。
无论是读原文还是译文,读者都喜欢权威的口气,让人感觉到专业人在说内幕话。为了做到这点,译者要先了解,再大胆地表达。千万别卡在词汇层面上。


 

clearwater
China
Local time: 20:17
English to Chinese
TOPIC STARTER
老差口气 Jun 26, 2014

谢谢Phil的直言!

说实话,我也觉得自己的翻译时常是差口气(可能在行家看来,差的还不止一口、两口)。当然,这可以“归咎于”文章本身太难了,但我觉得更主要还是归咎于译者本身的水平,我一直期盼着能达到这个程度:每次都能将全文顺利流畅、无难点(注意:没有一个难点)地翻译下来。只可惜,这种情形并不多见,除非是文章相对浅显,又是自己擅长的领域。更常见的情况是,每篇文章总会有那么几个点被卡住。

继续前进吧......


 

QHE
United States
Local time: 08:17
English to Chinese
+ ...
什么是循序渐进? Jun 27, 2014

Read: Page 1 → Page 2→ Page 3


Evan Schuman: Starbucks and the art of persuasion

By Evan Schuman January 14, 2014 08:35 AM ET


Page 1

Computerworld - Business would be so much easier if we didn't have to deal with human beings, with all their fears, hesitations and general avoidance of anything new. Human beings have a tendency to resist all your great ideas to make things better, be they your employees saying no to your aggressive cloud program or your customers ignoring your attempts to move them to mobile payment or biometric identification. And it can seem that the harder you push, the more they resist.

Maybe the answer is to stop trying so hard. Maybe the model you should emulate is the go-slow -- you might even say decaffeinated -- approach taken by Starbucks. The coffee purveyor seems to have some insight into how humans think.

Starbucks is considered the most successful U.S. retailer when it comes to handling mobile payments and, for that matter, mobile anything. So what makes it so different from everyone else? Pretty much everything. Most retailers interested in moving their customers to mobile payment would have seen the 2013 holiday shopping season as an opportunity to push their mobile app and encourage their shoppers to load dollars onto the mobile apps of their intended gift recipients. Not Starbucks, though. Although it is very interested in moving customers to mobile payment, it chose to not push mobile at all during the holidays. Instead, it encouraged the purchase of old-fashioned, plastic Starbucks cards, the kind that fit neatly into holiday stockings. But wait; how is that a mobile-payment strategy? Ah, well, as soon as January rolled around, Starbucks launched a massive campaign to encourage people to take those plastic cards and use them to pour digital dollars into a Starbucks app. How did things work out? For starters, Starbucks sold a lot of Starbucks cards. On just one day (Dec. 19), the chain saw 2.4 million new card activations. In the fourth quarter, sales of cards totaled $160 million, "a significant increase over last year," said Starbucks spokesperson Linda Mills, who declined to give an actual percentage. She added that while Dec. 19 is now the title holder for new card sales, two other days (Dec. 23 and Dec. 24) also broke company records.

And what about the conversion of all those Starbucks cards to smartphone payment apps? It's still early in the month, so Starbucks isn't saying. But this isn't the first year that Starbucks has pursued this strategy, and the company will say that January is typically its No. 1 month for mobile conversions. And as I said earlier, Starbucks is generally thought to be the mobile-payment king of American retail.



page 2

So just how did Starbucks come to be so far ahead of everyone else on mobile payment? Part of the answer is luck. Many years ago, it decided to get its customers to migrate from paying with credit cards and instead to use those stored-value cards. It was a pretty easy transition, from one plastic card to another. Starbucks had no intent at the time for that to be the first step in a mobile-payment strategy, but that's what it has turned out to be. Now, years later, it is just much easier to move customers to mobile because they have already gotten used to pulling out a Starbucks-only payment "device." They only had to master one new behavior (going from using a Starbucks card to using the Starbucks app) rather than two (stop using a credit card to do something retailer-specific, and that retail-specific thing is on the customer's smartphone, not a bit of plastic in his wallet) that other retailers were faced with.

What Starbucks has figured out is the power of going slow when trying to move people into uncomfortable tech arenas. It pushed the non-threatening plastic, with great success. Once it had sold millions, then, and only then, did it make any aggressive push for mobile.
Yes, Starbucks' ultimate goal was to get its customers to load the mobile app, but it moved far more dollars to its counters by taking it slow. The drip-drip of the best coffeemakers also works well for making converts comfortable.

And you want your customers to be comfortable with what you're getting them to do. Your employees too. Everyone is more comfortable with evolution than revolution.

Starbucks' mobile app is itself an example of the evolutionary, go-slow approach. It isn't fancy -- or frightening. The company didn't adopt NFC or leverage Bluetooth. Instead, it simply takes a picture of the barcode on the back of a Starbucks cards and places that image in the app. Not only does this make the transition another exercise in gradualness, but it is also remarkably inexpensive for IT, since the very same scanning equipment that works on the plastic cards also works on the phones. (Over the years, upgraded scanners have made the system more phone-friendly, but those upgrades are the same sort of equipment that other retailers have deployed.)

What are the implications for your own technology transitions? Many. Repeatedly, companies push new technology on its employees and customers by touting the benefits, but rarely do they factor in the change in behavior the move entails. When Wal-Mart pushed RFID on its suppliers, demanding that they place an RFID chip in every product shipped, it was caught off guard by nearly universal resistance. It was true that the chip would ultimately benefit both parties, but that would come only after years of labor-intensive changes made at a huge cost.



page 3

The rush to get to the ultimate goal has doomed far too many technology rollouts. But speed has the unfortunate side effect of making a risky behavior change seem even scarier. Taking baby steps may mean a rollout takes years longer, but if its acceptance is sharply increased, doesn't that increase its effectiveness? I think it does, especially when the alternative is a simple refusal to budge.

"Consumers, like employees, can only handle one adjacency at a time. No more. I can't learn two things at once," says Todd Ablowitz, a payments consultant who is president of Double Diamond Group. "If you give people too much too soon, they can't handle it. The consumer will give you more if you give them more time, provided you're giving them something that they value."

******


http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9245392/Evan_Schuman_Starbucks_and_the_art_of_persuasion?taxonomyId=240&pageNumber=1


[Edited at 2014-06-27 00:38 GMT]


 

David Lin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:17
Member (2013)
English to Chinese
+ ...

Moderator of this forum
已经解释清楚了 Jun 28, 2014

Phil Hand wrote:

http://www.strategy-business.com/blog/How-IKEA-Disney-and-Berkshire-Hathaway-Succeed-with-Adjacencies?gko=fa07c

IKEA identifies itself with a mission to provide well-designed products at a lower price than anyone else can offer. And now it’s selling televisions. Is this the typical adjacencies thinking? “Hey, if our customers are buying furniture, they might also be in the market for TVs.

http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/the-paradox-of-adjacency-expansion.aspx
Selling highly related products to customers you know well is one of the most successful adjacency moves.

Consider Olam International, launched in 1989 as an exporter of Nigerian cashews...Through repeated adjacency moves into other producing countries such as Ghana and Cameroon, Olam rapidly became a leading supplier of cocoa beans and products.

http://marakon.com/images/uploads/documents/Marakon-Commentary-Entry-Into-Adjacent-Businesses_vf.pdf
Adjacencies are new business areas that most often build from a company’s established assets.

Consumers, like employees, can only handle {one adjacency} at a time. No more. I can't learn two things at once,
消费者与员工一样,只能接受品牌一时做一种延伸,不能更多,他们不能同时消化两种新概念。

[Edited at 2014-06-26 02:57 GMT]


adjacency = 一个品牌/行业的相关(附属)产品 (是市场学用语)。

好像清洁服务行业也可以同时售卖地板垫、抹窗服务、办公室/家庭空气清新用品等相关产品。同 “循序渐进” 没有直接关系,因为 “循序渐进” 只是公司企业用来进入 “相关产品” 市场的手段。 “相关产品” 是其目的。

正如 QHE 在 page 1-3 的原文描述。

老练的市场学专家 marketing 都晓得不能一下子推出太多相关产品给现有的消费者,不然会引起反作用,因为一些现有顾客可能已经购买其他公司的产品,产生了忠诚感,不会轻易改变购买态度。所以原文说要采取 go-slow 方式来进入相关产品市场,给人们有时间去适应改变所带来的影响。

对顾客考虑的问题也适用于公司自己的员工,例如推销员。因为大家都是人,对于新事物的改变,存在相同心理因素。

正所谓,欲速则不达。

Phil 的理解其实已经很正确。

The janitorial service business is not glamorous. These companies send crews to clean commercial buildings. I spoke to one a while ago. He was an entrepreneur with a franchise. He asked me about adjacencies and what I meant by that after hearing me speak.

“They are businesses right next to yours. Your customers buy things from other business right now.”

“What do you mean right next to?” he asked.

I said, “The same people you call on for cleaning services could be buying floor mats and runners, plant care services, recycling services, window washing services, safety products, air filtration products, etc. If you figure out a better way to supply these things you not only acquire some of the business but you can leverage the expense of sending out a crew and increase the ROI of your company.”


http://www.growthwizards.com/the-most-powerful-strategy-adjacencies/


 

QHE
United States
Local time: 08:17
English to Chinese
+ ...
不同理解 Jun 28, 2014

我觉得根据语境,“ adjacency” 在这篇文章里代表“循序渐进"的(变化),"循序引入"的(persuasion)方式。


David Lin wrote:已经解释清楚了

Phil Hand wrote:

http://www.strategy-business.com/blog/How-IKEA-Disney-and-Berkshire-Hathaway-Succeed-with-Adjacencies?gko=fa07c

IKEA identifies itself with a mission to provide well-designed products at a lower price than anyone else can offer. And now it’s selling televisions. Is this the typical adjacencies thinking? “Hey, if our customers are buying furniture, they might also be in the market for TVs.

http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/the-paradox-of-adjacency-expansion.aspx
Selling highly related products to customers you know well is one of the most successful adjacency moves.

Consider Olam International, launched in 1989 as an exporter of Nigerian cashews...Through repeated adjacency moves into other producing countries such as Ghana and Cameroon, Olam rapidly became a leading supplier of cocoa beans and products.

http://marakon.com/images/uploads/documents/Marakon-Commentary-Entry-Into-Adjacent-Businesses_vf.pdf
Adjacencies are new business areas that most often build from a company’s established assets.

Consumers, like employees, can only handle {one adjacency} at a time. No more. I can't learn two things at once,
消费者与员工一样,只能接受品牌一时做一种延伸,不能更多,他们不能同时消化两种新概念。

[Edited at 2014-06-26 02:57 GMT]


adjacency = 一个品牌/行业的相关(附属)产品 (是市场学用语)。

好像清洁服务行业也可以同时售卖地板垫、抹窗服务、办公室/家庭空气清新用品等相关产品。同 “循序渐进” 没有直接关系,因为 “循序渐进” 只是公司企业用来进入 “相关产品” 市场的手段。 “相关产品” 是其目的。

正如 QHE 在 page 1-3 的原文描述。

老练的市场学专家 marketing 都晓得不能一下子推出太多相关产品给现有的消费者,不然会引起反作用,因为一些现有顾客可能已经购买其他公司的产品,产生了忠诚感,不会轻易改变购买态度。所以原文说要采取 go-slow 方式来进入相关产品市场,给人们有时间去适应改变所带来的影响。

对顾客考虑的问题也适用于公司自己的员工,例如推销员。因为大家都是人,对于新事物的改变,存在相同心理因素。

正所谓,欲速则不达。

Phil 的理解其实已经很正确。

The janitorial service business is not glamorous. These companies send crews to clean commercial buildings. I spoke to one a while ago. He was an entrepreneur with a franchise. He asked me about adjacencies and what I meant by that after hearing me speak.

“They are businesses right next to yours. Your customers buy things from other business right now.”

“What do you mean right next to?” he asked.

I said, “The same people you call on for cleaning services could be buying floor mats and runners, plant care services, recycling services, window washing services, safety products, air filtration products, etc. If you figure out a better way to supply these things you not only acquire some of the business but you can leverage the expense of sending out a crew and increase the ROI of your company.”


http://www.growthwizards.com/the-most-powerful-strategy-adjacencies/


[Edited at 2014-06-28 15:24 GMT]


 

clearwater
China
Local time: 20:17
English to Chinese
TOPIC STARTER
谢谢! Jun 28, 2014

QHE wrote:

Read: Page 1 → Page 2→ Page 3


Evan Schuman: Starbucks and the art of persuasion

By Evan Schuman January 14, 2014 08:35 AM ET


Page 1

Computerworld - Business would be so much easier if we didn't have to deal with human beings, with all their fears, hesitations and general avoidance of anything new. Human beings have a tendency to resist all your great ideas to make things better, be they your employees saying no to your aggressive cloud program or your customers ignoring your attempts to move them to mobile payment or biometric identification. And it can seem that the harder you push, the more they resist.

Maybe the answer is to stop trying so hard. Maybe the model you should emulate is the go-slow -- you might even say decaffeinated -- approach taken by Starbucks. The coffee purveyor seems to have some insight into how humans think.

Starbucks is considered the most successful U.S. retailer when it comes to handling mobile payments and, for that matter, mobile anything. So what makes it so different from everyone else? Pretty much everything. Most retailers interested in moving their customers to mobile payment would have seen the 2013 holiday shopping season as an opportunity to push their mobile app and encourage their shoppers to load dollars onto the mobile apps of their intended gift recipients. Not Starbucks, though. Although it is very interested in moving customers to mobile payment, it chose to not push mobile at all during the holidays. Instead, it encouraged the purchase of old-fashioned, plastic Starbucks cards, the kind that fit neatly into holiday stockings. But wait; how is that a mobile-payment strategy? Ah, well, as soon as January rolled around, Starbucks launched a massive campaign to encourage people to take those plastic cards and use them to pour digital dollars into a Starbucks app. How did things work out? For starters, Starbucks sold a lot of Starbucks cards. On just one day (Dec. 19), the chain saw 2.4 million new card activations. In the fourth quarter, sales of cards totaled $160 million, "a significant increase over last year," said Starbucks spokesperson Linda Mills, who declined to give an actual percentage. She added that while Dec. 19 is now the title holder for new card sales, two other days (Dec. 23 and Dec. 24) also broke company records.

And what about the conversion of all those Starbucks cards to smartphone payment apps? It's still early in the month, so Starbucks isn't saying. But this isn't the first year that Starbucks has pursued this strategy, and the company will say that January is typically its No. 1 month for mobile conversions. And as I said earlier, Starbucks is generally thought to be the mobile-payment king of American retail.



page 2

So just how did Starbucks come to be so far ahead of everyone else on mobile payment? Part of the answer is luck. Many years ago, it decided to get its customers to migrate from paying with credit cards and instead to use those stored-value cards. It was a pretty easy transition, from one plastic card to another. Starbucks had no intent at the time for that to be the first step in a mobile-payment strategy, but that's what it has turned out to be. Now, years later, it is just much easier to move customers to mobile because they have already gotten used to pulling out a Starbucks-only payment "device." They only had to master one new behavior (going from using a Starbucks card to using the Starbucks app) rather than two (stop using a credit card to do something retailer-specific, and that retail-specific thing is on the customer's smartphone, not a bit of plastic in his wallet) that other retailers were faced with.

What Starbucks has figured out is the power of going slow when trying to move people into uncomfortable tech arenas. It pushed the non-threatening plastic, with great success. Once it had sold millions, then, and only then, did it make any aggressive push for mobile.
Yes, Starbucks' ultimate goal was to get its customers to load the mobile app, but it moved far more dollars to its counters by taking it slow. The drip-drip of the best coffeemakers also works well for making converts comfortable.

And you want your customers to be comfortable with what you're getting them to do. Your employees too. Everyone is more comfortable with evolution than revolution.

Starbucks' mobile app is itself an example of the evolutionary, go-slow approach. It isn't fancy -- or frightening. The company didn't adopt NFC or leverage Bluetooth. Instead, it simply takes a picture of the barcode on the back of a Starbucks cards and places that image in the app. Not only does this make the transition another exercise in gradualness, but it is also remarkably inexpensive for IT, since the very same scanning equipment that works on the plastic cards also works on the phones. (Over the years, upgraded scanners have made the system more phone-friendly, but those upgrades are the same sort of equipment that other retailers have deployed.)

What are the implications for your own technology transitions? Many. Repeatedly, companies push new technology on its employees and customers by touting the benefits, but rarely do they factor in the change in behavior the move entails. When Wal-Mart pushed RFID on its suppliers, demanding that they place an RFID chip in every product shipped, it was caught off guard by nearly universal resistance. It was true that the chip would ultimately benefit both parties, but that would come only after years of labor-intensive changes made at a huge cost.



page 3

The rush to get to the ultimate goal has doomed far too many technology rollouts. But speed has the unfortunate side effect of making a risky behavior change seem even scarier. Taking baby steps may mean a rollout takes years longer, but if its acceptance is sharply increased, doesn't that increase its effectiveness? I think it does, especially when the alternative is a simple refusal to budge.

"Consumers, like employees, can only handle one adjacency at a time. No more. I can't learn two things at once," says Todd Ablowitz, a payments consultant who is president of Double Diamond Group. "If you give people too much too soon, they can't handle it. The consumer will give you more if you give them more time, provided you're giving them something that they value."

******


http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9245392/Evan_Schuman_Starbucks_and_the_art_of_persuasion?taxonomyId=240&pageNumber=1


[Edited at 2014-06-27 00:38 GMT]

谢谢QHE帮着理清脉络!


 

QHE
United States
Local time: 08:17
English to Chinese
+ ...
You're welcome. Jun 29, 2014

clearwater wrote:

谢谢QHE帮着理清脉络!


Clearwater,

不用谢,大家互相启发。:)


 

J.H. Wang
China
Local time: 20:17
Member (2007)
English to Chinese
+ ...
谈谈个人的理解 Jun 29, 2014

首先,handle one adjacency 中的重点词是 one,就是一个、一项、一种的意思。No more,不能再多了。handle 这里最好不要翻译成”处理“,它的意思是:应付得了,应付过来。

至于 adjacency 的意思,我觉得 Phil 的解释是有道理的,就是相近的产品、服务等,或者说是延伸、衍生的产品、服务等。

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/adjacency

2. A thing that is adjacent.

我觉得“循序渐进” 抓住了原文的大意,就是说不要一下子贪太多,当然还可以在措辞上再斟酌一下,以便与下文吻合。


供各位参考和指教。

[Edited at 2014-06-29 11:12 GMT]


 

David Lin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:17
Member (2013)
English to Chinese
+ ...

Moderator of this forum
唯一危机 Jun 29, 2014

"循序渐进" 是全篇文章的要旨没错,重点在于采取 the model of go-slow approach 缓慢步伐,但是个人觉得 "循序渐进" 只是一个方式/态度,而文章重点却是 adjacency,里面特别指出引进相关的货品/服务 -- 即如在手机付费方面,Starbucks 不会一下子要求全部顾客用手机付费,反而先推出传统的公司嘉宾卡 company plastic cards,之后才向顾客推广通过 plastic cards 在其 Starbucks mobile app 上增值 digital dollars 来付费。

1。 plastic cards --> 2。 mobile app --> 3。 mobile payment

这三步程序中所引进的前两个都是 Starbucks 公司的 “相关服务”,第三个是其想达到的最终目的,亦即文章所提到的 “技术过渡” technology transition 。

将 adjacency 译成 "循序渐进" 是可以的,却缺少了原文想表达的 “引进相关的产品服务” 。(参看上面的三步曲作例子)

好像如果说,在夏天干旱期间,国民应 “节约用水” 。如果我们将它翻译为国民应节约 “天然资源”,而不强调 ”用水“ 。结果是显而易见的;译文因此变得非常空洞。由于读者需要猜测究竟是 “什么天然资源?” ,“那一种天然资源?”,因此会容易引起误解。

也如 Phil 所说:“看这个译文的读者疑问重重:什么是循序渐进?循什么序?”

从翻译标准来说,有关 ”达“ 方面就会出现问题了。

这也是我关心的唯一危机。

供讨论。


 
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