New to Deja Vu: some questions
Thread poster: Tineke Blokzijl - Haar

Tineke Blokzijl - Haar  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:13
English to Dutch
Oct 28, 2005

Hello everyone,

I have recently downloaded the trail version of DVX (in my case DVX workgroup - why I don't know, I'm just a single freelance translator), and have some questions.

1.
What is the difference between DVX workgroup and DVX professional? Which one would be most appropriate for a single freelance translator?

2.
Is DVX completely compatible with TRADOS? Is it possible to use Trados-projects and Trados TM's in Deja Vu? (DVX will be my first CAT tool, so I have no experience whatsoever with any CAT tool, I just see Trados passing my screen very often)

3.
Are there people here that use several CAT Tools? If yes, what are the main pro's of DVX compared to the other tools? For me the main pro is that source and target file are next to each other. I also downloaded a trial version of Trados, but I really don't like it that the source and target text are in the same document.

4.
Do you use DVX for all your translation work (or at least for all customers that you regularly get assignments from)?

Well that's it for now. I hope you can help me out here.

Kind regards,

Tineke Blokzijl- Haar


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Victor Dewsbery  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 04:13
German to English
+ ...
Welcome to DVX - some answers Oct 28, 2005

Tineke Blokzijl - Haar wrote:
1.
What is the difference between DVX workgroup and DVX professional? Which one would be most appropriate for a single freelance translator?
2.
Is DVX completely compatible with TRADOS? Is it possible to use Trados-projects and Trados TM's in Deja Vu? (DVX will be my first CAT tool, so I have no experience whatsoever with any CAT tool, I just see Trados passing my screen very often)
3.
Are there people here that use several CAT Tools? If yes, what are the main pro's of DVX compared to the other tools? For me the main pro is that source and target file are next to each other. I also downloaded a trial version of Trados, but I really don't like it that the source and target text are in the same document.
4.
Do you use DVX for all your translation work (or at least for all customers that you regularly get assignments from)?


1. WG has a few extra features (although I have never missed them - I work with DVX Pro). Look at the comparison table on the Atril website (http://www.atril.com). I'm glad to hear you are not going for the Standard version.

2. On the whole it seems to be compatible (although I have never done a Trados-DV-Trados project). Lots of experts can be found on the mailing list dejavu-l@yahoogroups.com, several of them based in the Benelux countries (in fact, I think there is also a group that operates in Dutch).

3. N/A

4. Yes, I use it for everything (except for stuff not in digital format, although even then I try to OCR it and use DVX). Have done everything I can in DV since late 1999, although I tend to get prose texts without much repetition. But even without the productivity factor that comes with some types of text, I still find DVX a very good working environment (and good for consistency, too).


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Kevin Fulton  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:13
German to English
A few comments Oct 28, 2005

Let me first state that people feel about their TM tools the same way others feel about their religion or political party. Many are convinced that what they use is the best, and the others are inferior.

1. A single translator probably will have no need for DVX workgroup edition. The advantage that it offers is that large projects can be packaged into "satellite" projects for distribution to other translators. There may other advantages, but again, they are mainly for agencies or project coordinators.

2. Compatibility: I use DVX for Trados projects, but I first pre-segment the files using Trados. You can download a trial version of Trados for this purpose. You will need to create an empty dummy translation memory for segmenting. Maybe someone else knows a way around this, but I don't.

Trados TMs can be imported, but they must first be converted to .txt files. DVX TMs can be exported into Trados-compatible .txt files. But there is no direct compatibility. I've not found this to be a problem.

3. Advantages. I also own Trados and SDLX (which I rarely use).
Let me first state that I've found Trados TagEditor to be a superior tool for some file formats such as PowerPoint or XML files. Since DV was my first translation tool, I've found it to be more compatible with my style of working (or ... I've adapted my approach to the DV paradigm). I like having the text side-by-side. I like the ability to export the translation to a two-column Word file for proofing, correcting and editing, so I'm not necessarily tied to a computer with DVX. I've found DVX to be more stable than Trados since only 1 program is running at a time (this has changed in Trados 7, I've heard, but I haven't installed Trados 7 since none of my clients use it yet, and I don't want to pose compatibility problems with my clients).

4. Like Victor, I use DVX whenever possible. I scan clearly legible hardcopy in order to obtain Word-compatible files.

I've found that using TM tools has increased my productivity, and once I learned how to use them, the quality of my product also improved. I learned the hard way on my first job that garbage in = garbage out (GIGO).


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Yolanda Broad  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:13
Member (2000)
French to English
+ ...

MODERATOR
Do work on building your TM database! Oct 28, 2005

Whatever TM you work with, remember that it's only a vehicle for what you put into it.

Some hints:

1. Make sure you're putting every single meaningful pair that you create into the Translation Memory database. It's all those little bits of material that you produce *in your own translation style* that are going to make future translations such a pleasure in DV. It's going to be very slow going to begin with. But ah! Just think how delightful it will be to see those bits reappearing later on in the translation, and again and again, in future jobs!

2. Work on mastering those keyboard shortcuts. The less mousing you do, the happier your hands are going to be.

3. Make sure you proofread the document *before* you import it to DV: those stray spaces, missing accents, and misspellings will interfere with the consistency of your translation.

4. Watch out for extra codes, and learn how to move them to the end of a segment. It will make building the memories so much more pleasant.

Now, as for translating Trados files in DV. I'll take Trados jobs *if* the memory and text have been presegmented by the client. But, since I don't have Trados myself, I can't do that kind of segmenting. I have several clients who are perfectly happy to presegment for me, and get back the exported Trados-segmented translations. One slight caveat: you can't join or split segments that are going to be exported back to Trados, or you'll mess up the Trados segmentation. [Note: I don't have Trados, I don't like the way files look in Trados. Other people can't stand the way files look in DV: they want to see the actual layout while they're translating. I want to concentrate on the text without having to look at all the extras, and love having those source/target columns side by side. A chacun son goût.]


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Piotr Sawiec  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:13
English to Polish
+ ...
excellent tool Oct 28, 2005

Hi

DV is the only CAT I use. I tried Wordfast, and although praised by many users, it caused me trouble with clearing translation, separation of translation units, which was very difficult to correct. DV is devoid of such problems, although I encountered some others:
1. From time to time I had problems with exporting the translation, fortunately an option of exporting to two columns worked.
2. When importing, it very frequently occurs that the codes are put in rather unexpected places, sometimes splitting a word in two (has anybody else encountered it? And how can one deal with it?), so I had a sentence split in several parts.

the best part that I like about DV is assembling translations, which means that you can have very small translation units (entered for one project only and then deleted) that are repeated many times throughout a text, and DV can insert them instead of original phrases.

Anyway, I also use it for all translations that are not in graphic form, my TM database is 50MB and DV still works very quickly.

Piotr


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Victor Dewsbery  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 04:13
German to English
+ ...
Codes in words Oct 28, 2005

Hi Piotr,

Piotr Sawiec wrote:
2. When importing, it very frequently occurs that the codes are put in rather unexpected places, sometimes splitting a word in two (has anybody else encountered it? And how can one deal with it?), so I had a sentence split in several parts.


This is usually due to things in the Word file (automatic hyphenation, manual hyphenation, tracked changes, language coding etc., changes in font, style, letter width etc.).
After searching and deleting manual hyphenation, turning off automatic hyphenation and accepting all changes, you can save the document in Word 6.0/95 format to get rid of almost all of the codes.
Sometimes this doesn't work because of loss of formatting, but usually it is OK.

If I am still stuck with superfluous codes in rotten places, I just drag them to the end of the segment where they can do no harm.

A good place for general hints on DV is http://necco.ca/dv/


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Klas Törnquist
Local time: 04:13
English to Swedish
+ ...
Go for it. Nov 2, 2005

Tineke Blokzijl - Haar wrote:
2.
Is DVX completely compatible with TRADOS? Is it possible to use Trados-projects and Trados TM's in Deja Vu? (DVX will be my first CAT tool, so I have no experience whatsoever with any CAT tool, I just see Trados passing my screen very often)


Some 90 % of what I do is in Trados format and I do it in DVX.


3.
Are there people here that use several CAT Tools? If yes, what are the main pro's of DVX compared to the other tools? For me the main pro is that source and target file are next to each other. I also downloaded a trial version of Trados, but I really don't like it that the source and target text are in the same document.


I have Trados and used it for a couple of years. One important advantage of DVX as compared with Trados (and Wordfast, I think) is that DVX can handle several files as one big file. This is very handy for HTML projects that may consist of hundreds of small files. Also, DVX projects may consist of files of different formats, e.g Word, Excel Powerpoint and many others.

To be honest, the Trados approach of using bilingual documents is rather good.


4.
Do you use DVX for all your translation work (or at least for all customers that you regularly get assignments from)?


Yes.

Klas


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