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V. embarrassing - pipi et caca
Thread poster: pkb (X)

pkb (X)

Local time: 03:45
French to English
Jul 3, 2003

Can anyone help with some polite translations for "faire pipi" and "faire caca"?

This has to do with Versailles, behind the curtains, but also in the Paris sewers - "C’est pas du tout scatologique ce que je vais dire, mais le pipi-caca fait partie des choses de la vie."

"Spend a penny" is pipi, but I can't think of anything (OK, OK, lots of vulgar expressions) for caca.


 

Maria Riegger (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:45
Spanish to English
+ ...
number one and number two Jul 3, 2003

Hi Philip,

When I was little, in the U.S. people referred to them as doing or going a number one and number two. I think it's a little better than other more vulgar expressionsicon_wink.gif))

Also, go pooh or do a pooh would be another less euphemistic option.

Good luck! Sounds like an interesting read, by the way!

Maria


 

Cristina Moldovan do Amaral  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:45
Member (2002)
English to Romanian
+ ...
:)) Jul 3, 2003

number two
to poop
to go poop
or
to take a poop

to urinate- to take a whiz or a pee


 

Susana Galilea  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:45
English to Spanish
+ ...
one more... Jul 3, 2003

Cristina M. Zali wrote:
to urinate- to take a whiz or a pee


or to take a tinkle


 

pkb (X)

Local time: 03:45
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
urinate, defecate, urine, faeces .... Jul 3, 2003

Cristina M. Zali wrote:

number two
to poop
to go poop
or
to take a poop

to urinate- to take a whiz or a pee


.... are my choices so far. Pooh, poop, No. 2, I think, are a bit childish.

This is for a TV programme about the Paris sewers (still open to the public, and I still haven't visited them in the 45 years since I first heard about them !)and, yes, it is fascinating.


 

mckinnc  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:45
French to English
+ ...
wee/wee wee and poo Jul 3, 2003

... are the most common expressions used when talking to small children in the UK. Also "jobbie" in Scotland for the latter as in Billy Connolly's famous "jobbie wheecher" sketch.

I am also familiar with the expression "number twos".

Here ends my genteelly scatological input.

Philip BOYDEN wrote:

Can anyone help with some polite translations for "faire pipi" and "faire caca"?

This has to do with Versailles, behind the curtains, but also in the Paris sewers - "C’est pas du tout scatologique ce que je vais dire, mais le pipi-caca fait partie des choses de la vie."

"Spend a penny" is pipi, but I can't think of anything (OK, OK, lots of vulgar expressions) for caca.


 

Alterlingua
Local time: 04:45
English to French
+ ...
Pipi and caca are a bit childish Jul 3, 2003

Hi Philip!

I've seen your choices and I must admit I am quite surprised as "pipi" and "caca" are childish words. I would have thought the words proposed by the other "Prozians" are best suited.

Anyway good luck for your translation.

Maïté.


 

Carlos Monteiro
Portugal
Local time: 03:45
English to Portuguese
+ ...
note this: Jul 3, 2003

"answer to Human Mother Nature basic needs"

 

Caroline Mackay-Sim (X)  Identity Verified

Local time: 14:45
English to French
+ ...
urinate and defecate Jul 4, 2003

In my opinion, these are fine and have the advantage of not being too silly for the adult reader.





Philip BOYDEN wrote:

Cristina M. Zali wrote:

number two
to poop
to go poop
or
to take a poop

to urinate- to take a whiz or a pee


.... are my choices so far. Pooh, poop, No. 2, I think, are a bit childish.

This is for a TV programme about the Paris sewers (still open to the public, and I still haven't visited them in the 45 years since I first heard about them !)and, yes, it is fascinating.


 

sylver  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:45
English to French
Style and a translator's job Jul 4, 2003

A translator IMO is expected to convey the original message exactly as intended. If the French author choosed to resort to childish terms, sorry, but it is not up to the translator to decide "it's too childish" and change it on his own to more "acceptable" terms. "Pipi" and "caca" are just as embarassing in French as their English equivalents.

If you believe the author made a mistake by using those terms (after all, authors are not perfect) and that they should not be used, contact your client and get authorisation to edit the content. If the client agrees, great. But without the client's approval, the translator's job is to relay what has been written - not what he think should have been written.

It's childish? It's gotta stay that way.


 

pkb (X)

Local time: 03:45
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
Sorry, Sylver Jul 4, 2003

sylver wrote:

A translator IMO is expected to convey the original message exactly as intended. If the French author choosed to resort to childish terms, sorry, but it is not up to the translator to decide "it's too childish" and change it on his own to more "acceptable" terms. "Pipi" and "caca" are just as embarassing in French as their English equivalents.

If you believe the author made a mistake by using those terms (after all, authors are not perfect) and that they should not be used, contact your client and get authorisation to edit the content. If the client agrees, great. But without the client's approval, the translator's job is to relay what has been written - not what he think should have been written.

It's childish? It's gotta stay that way.


Sorry, Sylver, I don't agree. Firstly, there is no equivalent for caca, and secondly (perhaps you didn't realise this) this is not an "author", it's an interview. Pipi and caca are perfectly normal words in almost any level of speech French; their possible English equivalents aren't.


 

pkb (X)

Local time: 03:45
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks, Caroline Jul 4, 2003

Caroline Mackay-Sim wrote:

In my opinion, these are fine and have the advantage of not being too silly for the adult reader.


I'm glad someone agrees with me. I have used your suggestion.

Thanks to everyone for their suggestions.

P


 

pkb (X)

Local time: 03:45
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
Second thoughts, Sylver Jul 4, 2003

Can you suggest a "childish" translation that won't leave anyone feeling embarrassed? The French doesn't.

P



sylver wrote:

A translator IMO is expected to convey the original message exactly as intended. If the French author choosed to resort to childish terms, sorry, but it is not up to the translator to decide "it's too childish" and change it on his own to more "acceptable" terms. "Pipi" and "caca" are just as embarassing in French as their English equivalents.

If you believe the author made a mistake by using those terms (after all, authors are not perfect) and that they should not be used, contact your client and get authorisation to edit the content. If the client agrees, great. But without the client's approval, the translator's job is to relay what has been written - not what he think should have been written.

It's childish? It's gotta stay that way.


 

Emmanuelle Riffault  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 13:45
Member (2004)
German to French
+ ...
STOOOOOOOOOOOOOOP! Jul 4, 2003

C'est un forum en français !!!!!!!
Nom d'une pipe!


 

Anne Pietrasik
France
Local time: 04:45
English to French
+ ...
Agree 100 % with Sylver. Jul 5, 2003

sylver wrote:

A translator IMO is expected to convey the original message exactly as intended. If the French author choosed to resort to childish terms, sorry, but it is not up to the translator to decide "it's too childish" and change it on his own to more "acceptable" terms. "Pipi" and "caca" are just as embarassing in French as their English equivalents.

If you believe the author made a mistake by using those terms (after all, authors are not perfect) and that they should not be used, contact your client and get authorisation to edit the content. If the client agrees, great. But without the client's approval, the translator's job is to relay what has been written - not what he think should have been written.

It's childish? It's gotta stay that way.


In England, "to spend a penny" is frequently used, even with children, for "pipi". For "caca" or "la grosse commission" as it is called in polite circles, I agree with "to pooh" but the British tend to be rather prude and just say "to go to the toilet".


 
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