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Off topic: How to pronounce the "th" sound in English
Thread poster: RominaZ

RominaZ  Identity Verified
Argentina
Member (2006)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Mar 21, 2012

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Source: Englishdaybyday.net


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Simona Pop  Identity Verified
Romania
Local time: 21:10
Member (Feb 2017)
English to Romanian
+ ...
cool! Mar 21, 2012

)

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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:10
English to German
+ ...
:-) :-) :-) Mar 21, 2012

Yesss...

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Ty Kendall  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:10
Hebrew to English
One of the reasons... Mar 21, 2012

I'm glad English is my native language. I never envisioned it would be that hard to pronounce but the majority of foreigners do seem to struggle with it (unless it occurs in their language too i.e. Greeks and a few others).

If you want hard to articulate.....try Pharyngeals.



[Edited at 2012-03-21 13:04 GMT]


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njweatherdon
Canada
Member (2011)
French to English
+ ...
The tip of the tongue between the teeth Mar 21, 2012

Repeat out loud, and do as the sentence says. In time it becomes less exaggerated and more natural.

Fun picture though


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Theo Bernards  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:10
English to Dutch
+ ...
A trip through memory lane Mar 21, 2012

this is, because I actually saw this happen during my secondary school in The Netherlands. The English teacher got so annoyed with people getting it wrong, that he very loudly made it clear to people how it should be done - with flying dentures as a result. Hilarious!

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Ivan Petryshyn
English to Italian
+ ...
how to pronounce it Mar 21, 2012

you should:
1. review the Old English and Dutch, as well as Gothic- 3 months approximately;
2. develop a clear understanding of the D articulation - 1 more month;
3. stich your tongue in-between the teeth and pronounce Old germanic "D"!
4. memorize the tongue position and repeat it every day before you go to bed!
Ivan Petryshyn


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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:10
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Apocryphal Mar 23, 2012

There's a story, probably apocryphal, about a world-famous Spanish architect who, appointed Dean at a prestigious American university, had to give an inaugural lecture about his work.

In the course of his lecture he seemed to very frequently refer to sickness and death.

His American audience assumed this was the way European intellectuals think.

Then some way into the lecture, after the architect had shown a few slides, they realised he was trying to say "thickness" and "depth".


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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:10
Member (2008)
Italian to English
through ? Mar 23, 2012

Theo Bernards wrote:

this is, because I actually saw this happen during my secondary school in The Netherlands. The English teacher got so annoyed with people getting it wrong, that he very loudly made it clear to people how it should be done - with flying dentures as a result. Hilarious!


It's "down" memory lane. "Through memory lane" sounds quite funny



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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:10
English to German
+ ...
I love this story! :-) Mar 23, 2012

Tom in London wrote:

There's a story, probably apocryphal, about a world-famous Spanish architect who, appointed Dean at a prestigious American university, had to give an inaugural lecture about his work.

In the course of his lecture he seemed to very frequently refer to sickness and death.

His American audience assumed this was the way European intellectuals think.

Then some way into the lecture, after the architect had shown a few slides, they realised he was trying to say "thickness" and "depth".


I do recall a particular broadcast on German talk radio in the early 70s on how to pronounce this pesky "th". Memorable, because it coincided with my first English classes in fourth grade. It was recommended to pronounce it as a sharp "s". Ouch, I am not making this up. The problem that very young language learners all over the world have to encounter is that their teachers are not native speakers, hence the first thing the children will adopt is a weird accent. It's not their fault.


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Ty Kendall  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:10
Hebrew to English
Not gonna change... Mar 23, 2012

Nicole Schnell wrote:
their teachers are not native speakers, hence the first thing the children will adopt is a weird accent. It's not their fault.


At least in ELT circles, the idea of the native speaker teacher as in any way preferable is deeply politically incorrect.

It's all about "equality", no matter how misplaced the sentiment.

It's not that non-native speaking teachers are bad, not at all, there are a plethora of academic papers discussing the pros and cons of both "types" of teacher - the general consensus being that they "complement" each other, that both have strengths and weaknesses - clearly accent modelling is a strength of the native speaker teacher.

It does remind me though of a class I was observing where the teacher was a native Polish speaker, she was teaching household objects (mirror, carpet, TV, wardrobe etc)...

Apart from all the "Rs" being heavily trilled - a feature of some accents sure, but not to this extent.
In addition, I almost died when she was drilling the pronunciation of "chest of drawers" (chest of drouw-ers).


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:10
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Yorkshire surnames Mar 23, 2012

Imagine the misery for non-English speakers of those Yorkshire surnames that abound in "th"s, Thistlethwaite, for example, or "w"s, also difficult for some non-English speakers, such as Whishlade.
Jenny


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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:10
English to German
+ ...
Worcester Sauce. Mar 23, 2012

Available in every grocery store and very delicious. Try to tell anyone how to pronounce this thing. Or certain English cities...



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Rachel Fell  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:10
French to English
+ ...
Worcester sauce Mar 23, 2012

Nicole Schnell wrote:

Available in every grocery store and very delicious. Try to tell anyone how to pronounce this thing. Or certain English cities...


It's actually called Worcestershire sauce, so an even better challenge


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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:10
English to German
+ ...
I see :-) Mar 23, 2012

Rachel Fell wrote:

Nicole Schnell wrote:

Available in every grocery store and very delicious. Try to tell anyone how to pronounce this thing. Or certain English cities...




It's actually called Worcestershire sauce, so an even better challenge


How cruel...


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