Sample Translation/Beginner's rates/going freelance in Spain
Thread poster: Louise Souter
Louise Souter  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:59
Spanish to English
+ ...
Nov 25, 2008

I think it would help my proz profile if I attached a sample translation but am unsure what type of text I should use. Should I attach a general translation, one in my specialist areas or both? Also, I am more or less a complete beginner and therefore unsure what rates to set; I want to be realistic but at the same time I don't want to set low standards. Finally, can anyone tell me how I get set-up as freelance in Spain?

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Attila Piróth  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:59
Member
English to Hungarian
+ ...
2/3 Nov 25, 2008

I can only give advice about the first two questions.
You can add as many samples to the portfolio section of your profile as you wish. As it is a great way to showcase your expertise in diverse fields, I would suggest that you add several items. 200-300 words looks like an ideal length to me: short enough, so the readers can go through the whole of it easily - but sufficiently long for that they can get more than just a vague impression. Make sure you do not use any confidential or copyrighted material. Wikipedia entries are an option.
As for your price: If you browse the Getting established forum, you will find that this same question has been posed countless times. The reason is that there is no single answer - you have to decide for yourself. Take a look at the rate calculator: http://www.proz.com/?sp=rate_calc - it can give a ballpark figure.
Good luck,
Attila


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Paula James  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:59
French to English
+ ...
third point Nov 25, 2008

There is lots of information on setting up as freelance in the forums here, it's worth reading them. Basically, you have to register with the Hacienda and with Seguridad Social. I suggest having a read of the forums and if you have any specific questions come back and ask them.

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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:59
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Remaining 1/3: One-stop shopping Nov 25, 2008

A few years ago, Hacienda set up a "ventanilla única" where you could ask all your questions and file all your papers to start up (all, that is, except for SS). I suggest going there for a visit.

Next, you'll need the form 036 you get when you're finally registered to set up your Social Security. Be sure to ask:

- any favourable terms they are willing to give on account of your being a woman;
- any favourable terms they are willing to give on account of your age (mothers rejoining the work force and young people have certain advantages).


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Beatriz Pascual  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:59
French to Spanish
+ ...
Plenty of advice on the Asetrad website Nov 26, 2008

Louise Souter wrote:

Should I attach a general translation, one in my specialist areas or both?


Specialist.



Also, I am more or less a complete beginner and therefore unsure what rates to set; I want to be realistic but at the same time I don't want to set low standards.


Take a look at CalPro on the Asetrad website (www.asetrad.org) to work out the rates you need to charge to make a living.


Finally, can anyone tell me how I get set-up as freelance in Spain?


Again, take a look at the Asetrad website and think about joining the association - there are lots of people there who will be able to help you.


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Rod Brookes  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:59
Member (2008)
Spanish to English
My advice on the third query. Nov 26, 2008

I've just been through this within the last year so it's fresh in my mind. As has already been said, you need to register with the tax and the social security authorities. You can do a lot of this over the internet now: the forms you need can be downloaded from the respective websites. At time of writing the form you need for the social security is TA.0521-1 (www.seg-social.es) and the one for the hacienda either 036 or 037 (www.aeat.es). Apparently you can also submit forms over the internet by downloading a user's certificate from www.cert.fnmt.es (I say apparently because I haven't got round to doing it myself yet).

The other option is to pay an asesoría to do (almost) all of the work for you, which after all the above I have to admit is what I've done in the end! I'm sure there will be people here who will say it's too expensive for a translator but as far as I'm concerned it's a godsend to have someone else deal with all of that stuff on my behalf, freeing me up to focus on translation, marketing and acquiring new skills.

Finally although it's a good thing to familiarise yourself with all the procedures now, as far as I understand it, there's no point in actually registering until you're ready to go and you have your first invoice ready to prepare. As you probably already know, every complete month you are registered as a freelance you have to pay a minimum social security contribution of just over 240€. For now, just make sure that you have a social security number arranged.








[Edited at 2008-11-26 10:35 GMT]


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AdamsTransSC  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:59
Spanish to English
+ ...
Social security etc. Dec 16, 2008

Just wanted to point out that a reduced social security contribution is available for businesses that are less than three years old and for people under the age of 30.

I would also recommend using an asesoría. In my experience, it only costs around 40 euros a month, which you should be able to earn easily in an hour once you are established. And believe me, it would take you a lot longer than an hour to do everything yourself!

In addition, if you work from home and have a mortgage, you can claim tax relief on the initial costs of buying your house (if you buy it once you are established as a freelancer) and on 15% of the value of your mortgage payments.


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