Marketing yourself: Samples, Glossaries
Thread poster: Ruben Berrozpe
Ruben Berrozpe  Identity Verified
English to Spanish
Jul 21, 2003

Hi!

I got a couple of questions regarding marketing yourself (mainly to agencies). They're related to samples of your work and glossaries.

Concerning samples: How do you build them? Maybe from previous engagements - requesting the client's (or agency's) permission? Or do you create a mock translation out of the blue from a random internet text? I guess the first option will be more common, but there's always the problem of getting a suspicious agent's permission... Well, any suggestions?

(BTW, what if your translation has been made 'pubic' by the client in its web site? Could you just refer your prospective employer to the URL stating that you were the translator of this text? Is it possible that problems arise out of this with your current agency?)

Concerning glossaries: Are they confidential? Are they owned by the translator or the final client? Do you provide clients with glossaries? My first thought is: No, you don't. I mean, think glossaries should be my private tool and I don't think I should be making a company's specific terminology available to others. Is this right from a general point of view? Have you ever faced any conflict with agents or final clients about this?

Well, thanks for your comments.
Have a nice week!

Rb


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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:46
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Respect Non-Disclosure Agreements Jul 21, 2003

Ruben Berrozpe wrote:

Concerning samples: How do you build them? Maybe from previous engagements - requesting the client's (or agency's) permission? Or do you create a mock translation out of the blue from a random internet text? I guess the first option will be more common, but there's always the problem of getting a suspicious agent's permission... Well, any suggestions?

(BTW, what if your translation has been made 'pubic' by the client in its web site? Could you just refer your prospective employer to the URL stating that you were the translator of this text? Is it possible that problems arise out of this with your current agency?)

Concerning glossaries: Are they confidential? Are they owned by the translator or the final client? Do you provide clients with glossaries? My first thought is: No, you don't. I mean, think glossaries should be my private tool and I don't think I should be making a company's specific terminology available to others. Is this right from a general point of view? Have you ever faced any conflict with agents or final clients about this?

Rb


I'll have to be general...

Texts subject to agreements of non-disclosure cannot be cited or given out as samples. On another hand, texts that have been published and disseminated (news, published court rulings, public forms, etc.) are considered as having entered the public domain.

Strictly speaking, the author remains the owner of the texts, but the translator has a right to his labor. He might get in touch with the owner of the texts in order to request permission to use them as samples if non-disclosure agreements do not, or no longer, apply.

Glossaries furnished by the client are the client's property. If they contain proprietary terms, they should be treated as confidential. Glossaries compiled by the translator to service a client on his own initiative remain the property of the translator, and the choice of "giving" them to the client (as a gesture of goodwill, for example) is entirely up to him. The ownership of glossaries compiled by the translator on the request of the client (for teamwork's sake, for example) may be controversial in theory, but in practice they are intended to facilitate the future work of the team and usually serve as a basis for long-term working relationships. In such a case, there is likely to be more than one author.


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xxxMarc P  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:46
German to English
+ ...
Samples, glossaries Jul 22, 2003

Hi Ruben,

Firstly, you need to distinguish between agencies and end clients. As far as agencies are concerned, it is better to forget about trying to use any material you have translated for them. Concentrate on material you have produced for end clients.

An ideal sample is one on a client's web site. It has the advantage of being within the public view and obviously being genuine. Whether you can simply claim it as "your work" and, for example, link to it from your own web site, is something of a grey area: it depends upon the type of text and probably also upon the jurisdiction. The easiest solution is to ask the customer for permission - and also to include your name as the translator within the text. Customers are likely to be co-operative, as it is a good sign that a service provider wants to use work done for them as an example of good work.

Much the same applies to any other form of publicity material. If you have translated a printed brochure, catalogue, etc., scan some sample pages and post them on your web site. Don't just reproduce the text; publishing the final layout underlines the fact that you produced final, print-ready copy and makes a better impression.

If nothing you have ever translated has ever been published on the web, think of offering your services to translate a charity's web site for free in return for the free publicity.

Translators of printed publications sometimes reproduce the cover on their web sites. This doesn't provide any indication of the content, but it does look good to potential customers.

Glossaries can be a great way of demonstrating your expertise. A comprehensive glossary on a particular subject, posted on the Internet and indexed by the major search engines, is certain to attract some attention. It will only be any use though if it really is comprehensive, in which case you needn't worry much about terms coming from particular customers. Apart from the fact that the terms in a public glossary shouldn't be customer-specific anyway, the glossary should be so comprehensive that the influence of a particular company or body shouldn't be apparent. An automotive glossary for example which only includes Nissan's buzzwords isn't going to impress other auto manufacturers.

Marc


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Egmont
Spain
Local time: 13:46
Afrikaans to Spanish
+ ...
SAMPLES AND GLOSSARIES Jul 22, 2003

MarcPrior wrote:

Hi Ruben,

Firstly, you need to distinguish between agencies and end clients. As far as agencies are concerned, it is better to forget about trying to use any material you have translated for them. Concentrate on material you have produced for end clients.

An ideal sample is one on a client's web site. It has the advantage of being within the public view and obviously being genuine. Whether you can simply claim it as "your work" and, for example, link to it from your own web site, is something of a grey area: it depends upon the type of text and probably also upon the jurisdiction. The easiest solution is to ask the customer for permission - and also to include your name as the translator within the text. Customers are likely to be co-operative, as it is a good sign that a service provider wants to use work done for them as an example of good work.

Much the same applies to any other form of publicity material. If you have translated a printed brochure, catalogue, etc., scan some sample pages and post them on your web site. Don't just reproduce the text; publishing the final layout underlines the fact that you produced final, print-ready copy and makes a better impression.

If nothing you have ever translated has ever been published on the web, think of offering your services to translate a charity's web site for free in return for the free publicity.

Translators of printed publications sometimes reproduce the cover on their web sites. This doesn't provide any indication of the content, but it does look good to potential customers.

Glossaries can be a great way of demonstrating your expertise. A comprehensive glossary on a particular subject, posted on the Internet and indexed by the major search engines, is certain to attract some attention. It will only be any use though if it really is comprehensive, in which case you needn't worry much about terms coming from particular customers. Apart from the fact that the terms in a public glossary shouldn't be customer-specific anyway, the glossary should be so comprehensive that the influence of a particular company or body shouldn't be apparent. An automotive glossary for example which only includes Nissan's buzzwords isn't going to impress other auto manufacturers.

Marc
I send samples as requested but never Glossaries...you never know...


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Ruben Berrozpe  Identity Verified
English to Spanish
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Jul 23, 2003

Well, thanks very much for your comments. I just had one of my clients warning me against disclosure of thar materials... that's telepathy, no doubt.

Have a nice week!

Rb


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