Document seal (legalisation of translation)
Thread poster: Natalia Millman

Natalia Millman
Local time: 06:31
English to Russian
+ ...
Mar 5, 2004

Dear colleagues,

I wonder if you can help me to understand how the legalisation process works.

When the translation is finished, how does a translator legalise its proof and equivalence?

I know that some just write that such and such guarantees that the transaltion is adequate, etc.

others put a stamp of the agency and some others have Notary legalise it?? what is correct?

Where does a translation company in the UK get the stamp from??

thanks for your help

Natalia


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Elena Petelos  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:31
Member (2004)
English to Greek
+ ...
UK Legislation Mar 5, 2004

Dear colleague,
if you go to www.nettranslation.co.uk and bypass the information about their own services, you will find what I believe is a very good file to download giving ALL the relevant information regarding your question.
Also the Association of Translators and Interpreters and the Institute of Linguists supply relevant information.
Best of Luck


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Elena Petelos  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:31
Member (2004)
English to Greek
+ ...
Document Legalisation Mar 5, 2004

Also,

[Edited at 2004-03-05 21:10 embassy has its own guidelines.

[Edited at 2004-03-05 21:13]


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Levan Namoradze  Identity Verified
Georgia
Local time: 09:31
Member (2005)
English to Georgian
+ ...
well Mar 5, 2004

Notarization and legalization are two different things. Notarization means that a notary certifies a translator's signature (seal). Legalization, as far as I know, means that a notarized document is to be certified by a consulate department of a foreign state, because the said document is to be sent to that state.

In other words, shoudl you need to use a document in a country, where you live, you will need just to notarize it. Should you need to 'export' that document, you should firstly notarize it, then some specific entity should certify the notary's signature and at last, the consulate department of the relevant foreign state should certify the certification by the said entity i.e. legalize the document.


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Elena Petelos  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:31
Member (2004)
English to Greek
+ ...
Legalisation Mar 5, 2004

Dear Colleague,
if you go to
www.nettranslations.co.uk
and bypass the information about their services, you'll find a very useful download explaining everything including the Seal of Hague. Also the Institute of Linguists and the Association of Translators and Interpreters could give you further info.
Best of Luck


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Marijke Singer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:31
Dutch to English
+ ...
Legalisation Mar 6, 2004

Hi Natalia,

The way I see it is as follows (for the UK):
You do your translation and print it out. You add a page which should include your name, signature and saying something like:
This is a true translation of ...

Next you take the source document, translation and your added page to a Notary Public (you can find them in the Yellow Pages and are usually linked to a sollicitor's office) who will check your passport (or other document that shows that you are who you say you are!) and stamp your translation. This will cost between 50 and 70 pounds. The Notary Public will then send it to:
The Legalisation Office
Foreign & Commonwealth Office
Old Admiralty Building
The Mall
London SW1A 2LG

You can send it to them too, but usually turnaround will be quicker if the Notrary Public does it.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office will then add an apostille which means that the Notary Public's stamp and signature are true.
See website:
http://www.fco.gov.uk/servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1007029391449

What do we do?
We 'legalise' documents.
What is Legalisation?
Legalisation simply means confirming that a signature, seal or stamp appearing on a document is genuine.

Why documents need to be legalised?
The signatures or seals of British public officials (such as solicitors, notaries public, registrars) on certain documents from the United Kingdom have to be confirmed before those documents can be accepted overseas.

For example, if you want to get married or start working overseas, several documents (such as your birth certificate or academic qualifications) may need to be 'legalised'. To legalise a document we attach an apostille or a legalisation certificate to it. The fee for legalisation is £12 per document. If you are not sure what documents you need to legalise, you should contact the UK Overseas Mission of the relevant country.

I believe that if you are a member of ITI you do not need the Notary Public but can deal directly with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. But someone should confirm this, because I am not sure.

The thing to watch out for, though, is what is required in the country (or even region) where the legalised document will be used. An example:
Spain will accept copies of the source document but Mexico will not so you have to have the original document. Sometimes this can be a problem!

I usually insist on the original document and staple the whole thing together (original document, translation and my page). That way you can tell if someone has messed with it. Sometimes you also have to sign or initial every single page (source and translation).

If you phone a Notary Public and tell him or her that you need to legalise a document, they will usually tell you what you need to do after translation.

Good luck!


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conny  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:31
Member (2006)
English to German
+ ...
Certification of documents in Germany Mar 6, 2004

In Germany:
You can seal and certify a translated document if you are a "Sworn translator for the xyz.. language", i.e., in Berlin you have to have a paper from the Regional court (Landgericht Berlin) that you are allowed to seal the documents you translated (and that you are allowed to translate in courts with reference to your generally sworn oath - the oath you have to swear once in front of a competent judge of the Regional court).

When you want to certify a certain document that you have translated, you only put a certifaction phrase (I herewith certify that this a true and complete translation of the English .. original) then you stamp it with your stamp (the text on the stamp must be true), but this stamp can be produced by any stamp-maker in town.

In some specific cases such a (translator-) certified translation must be again certified by the 'certification' authority of the Regional court, but only for the correctness of your /my signature, not for the content of the translation.

Regards
C. Kauert


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Natalia Millman
Local time: 06:31
English to Russian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
it is clearer Mar 6, 2004

thank you for your help,
your tips are very useful!!!

One more question, doesn't the document have to be legalised before the translaton is made??

thanks

Natalia


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Marijke Singer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:31
Dutch to English
+ ...
Legalisation before translation Mar 7, 2004

Natalia Millman wrote:

One more question, doesn't the document have to be legalised before the translaton is made??

Natalia


Sometimes, a document has to be legalised before you start translating but this is really something that the customer should do. Basically, the customer takes it to his Notary Public who sorts out that apostille. Afterwards, you also translate the Notary Public's statement and the apostille.

Again, this is for the UK and only certain countries require this.


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