Certification exam, which is computerized instead of handwriting
Thread poster: pikachupichu

pikachupichu  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 02:04
English to Japanese
+ ...
Apr 20, 2012

Although I am a JTF certified translator, (http://www.jtf.jp/english/index.html), I am seeking additional 2 or 3 certifications from other bodies such as CTTIC, ATA, NAATI because I am supposed to eventually return to Canada. (I do not know when, though.)

The issue is, as far as I know, ATA and CTTIC are carrying out only handwriting test, which is a trouble for me, as I am handicapped with severe tenosynovitis with my right hand, so that I can't make a long essay in handwriting. I have no information for NAATI.

Computerized test is fine.

I appreciate if you let me know where I can take a computerized test toward a certification.


 

Johanna Timm, PhD  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 10:04
Member (2002)
English to German
+ ...
Try "On dossier certification" Apr 21, 2012

In Canada, this is offered as an alternative method to obtain the coveted professional status "Certified Translator".

On-dossier certification is intended for practicing professionals who can prove at least five years of full-time experience (or two years if they hold a honour’s bachelor degree, or equivalent, in their occupational category). The evaluation leading to certification thus does not just rely on a single time-limited examination, but rather on a full portfolio, which includes substantial and varied examples of work produced by the candidate during regular work as a translator, conference interpreter, court interpreter or terminologist.


Read more here:
http://www.atio.on.ca/services/certification.php

Hope this helps!

johanna


 

pikachupichu  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 02:04
English to Japanese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you very much for your quick response Apr 25, 2012

Dear Johanna,

I believe that Dossier is the right direction.

I will initiate the process.


[Edited at 2012-04-25 08:25 GMT]


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 19:04
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
IOL's DipTrans Apr 25, 2012

You can take the IOL's Diploma in Translation examination with a computer in many places, very probably also Japan. The exam is a controlled exam though, and you have to sit the exam in one of the approved exam venues.

Good luck!


 

pikachupichu  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 02:04
English to Japanese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
IoL is NOT computerized per British Council Jun 21, 2012

Where can I find the information concerning the computerized exam? As I have the sufficiently accumulated mileages to fly to UK, I can go there if the computerized exam is carried out only in UK.

 

Angela Dickson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:04
French to English
+ ...
DipTrans on computer Jun 21, 2012

pikachupichu wrote:

Where can I find the information concerning the computerized exam? As I have the sufficiently accumulated mileages to fly to UK, I can go there if the computerized exam is carried out only in UK.


Some exam centres for the DipTrans do have computing facilities, and I took my DipTrans on a computer (in Cardiff and Birmingham). Have a look on the IoL's website for the list of centres and contact some if it isn't clear whether they have computers. Otherwise, perhaps your local centre could be persuaded to provide computing facilities, particularly if you explain your disability?

The DipTrans is a high-level qualification but it is not technically "certification" in that it doesn't entitle you to provide certified translations in the legal sense. It is highly regarded, though.


 

Kevin Fulton  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:04
German to English
Exams should reflect how translators actually work Jun 21, 2012

I started translating part time in the the late 1960s and have translated full-time since 1981. In this period I have performed only three translations without a keyboard -- two were recipes, and the other was a short poem translated for an undergraduate examination. I haven't hand-written more than a few dozen sentences this century, mainly good wishes in birthday cards, etc. Virtually everything else I write involves a keyboard. At this juncture, I don't think I could maintain legible handwriting for more than a paragraph.

I don't know of any translator who hand-writes his/her work; I know a few who dictate their translations, using either voice transcription software or a personal assistant. Nevertheless the ATA continues to require certification applicants to write their translations by hand, a method that hasn't been common practice for decades.


 

Jenn Mercer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:04
Member (2009)
French to English
Help is coming Jun 21, 2012

I agree that the ATA's handwritten exam is hopelessly antiquated. Help is coming however, as the PTB are already at work to create a computerized version of the exam. I am not sure when it is expected, but after my past experience with the handwritten test, I am waiting for the computerized version to retake it.

 

pikachupichu  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 02:04
English to Japanese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
JTF site URL Aug 7, 2012

I have found that JTF site URL has been changed.

This is a new URL.

http://www.jtf.jp/english/


 

Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:04
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
ATA's first keyboarded exam - email received recently Aug 8, 2012

ATA Keyboarded Exam Sitting Registration Open

The American Translators Association will offer a keyboarded certification
exam sitting 10am-1pm, Saturday, August 18, at American University,
Washington, DC. The sitting is part of ATA's ongoing development of
keyboarded exams.

Candidates must bring their own laptops with a Windows Operating
System -- either XP, Vista, or Windows 7 -- installed.

ATA Certification Program Manager Jon Mendoza will provide additional
specifications and information, including testing your system, prior to the
exam sitting.

The sitting will be limited in size, and registrations will be processed in
the order received (first-come/first-served basis).

All candidates must be ATA members, offer proof of eligibility to take
the exam, and submit a registration form with fee by August 3.

To register, please download the Exam Registration Form and return it to
ATA Headquarters at the address listed on the form.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD
http://www.atanet.org/certification/upcoming_AU.php

Please note: As the software is still being tested, ATA is not responsible for
reimbursement of expenses if problems arise.

Thank you.

______________________________________________________

For questions and additional information, email ATA Certification
Program Manager Jonathan Mendoza at certification@atanet.org or
call (703) 683-6100, ext 3013.
_________________________


 

Michael Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:04
Member (2009)
Dutch to English
+ ...
These tests no longer measure how we actually translate these days. In any case, not how I translate Aug 8, 2012

Kevin Fulton wrote:

I started translating part time in the the late 1960s and have translated full-time since 1981. In this period I have performed only three translations without a keyboard -- two were recipes, and the other was a short poem translated for an undergraduate examination. I haven't hand-written more than a few dozen sentences this century, mainly good wishes in birthday cards, etc. Virtually everything else I write involves a keyboard. At this juncture, I don't think I could maintain legible handwriting for more than a paragraph.

I don't know of any translator who hand-writes his/her work; I know a few who dictate their translations, using either voice transcription software or a personal assistant. Nevertheless the ATA continues to require certification applicants to write their translations by hand, a method that hasn't been common practice for decades.


I am always surprised when I hear about exams where you are expected to use a pen. I suspect that even a paragraph would be too much for me, Kevin. I haven't written with a pen for over 15 years. God knows how I'd fare on a hand-written exam.

However, that's only the half of it. I also cannot imagine producing a decent translation without my CAT tool (memoQ), all of my paper, electronic, and online dictionaries and terminology resources, Google, my small army of trusty AutoHotkey scripts and shortcuts, my QA programs (Verifika and PerfectIT), etc.

These tests no longer measure how we actually translate these days. In any case, not how I translate.

Michael


 

pikachupichu  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 02:04
English to Japanese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Was the Aug 18, 2012 keyboarded exam successful? Aug 20, 2012

Was the first ATA keyboard settings exam on Aug. 18, 2012 in D.C. successful?

I realize that San Diego exam in October will be keyboarded.

Any news to confirm this?

Also, I am interesting in the tests in 2013, as San Diego exam may not be feasible because of my business schedule.


 


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Certification exam, which is computerized instead of handwriting

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