Sworn translator in the US
Thread poster: Valentina Costa

Valentina Costa  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:25
Italian to English
+ ...
Dec 17, 2012

I am an Italian translator with a BA at SSLMIT Trieste, Italy.
I will soon be moving to the States (Florida) and have my green card. In order to be prepared, I am starting to get information prior to my arrival.

My question is:
Being a foreigner with US green card, how will I be able to become a sworn translator? What is the process?

Second of, which are the best masters for translators and interpreters if one wants to progress in legal, financial and bank (yearly plans and similar) in the States?
I am also focusing on good (US and non) online courses. By saying good, I mean courses that provide a student with professional and accurate teaching, include internships or work experience and give the student the chance to connect with clients/agencies.

Thank you very much to anyone that can help. Also if I missed any older post, please do link it here.

Good luck to anyone that is organizing a similar future.


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 03:25
English to Spanish
+ ...
No such animal Dec 17, 2012

In the US there is no such thing as a sworn translator, it does not exist. There are certifications given by different government agencies for their own purposes, mostly in Spanish and occasionally a few other languages, but it is doubtful that Italian would be included anywhere. No credentials at all are required in the US to be a translator in any language, and it is a totally unregulated profession.

I would recommend that you contact other Italian translators living in the US to obtain their perspective on how you can do here. There are several who are pretty active on Proz, and I'm sure they can give you good advice.


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LEXpert  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 04:25
Member (2008)
Croatian to English
+ ...
No sworn translators Dec 18, 2012

Valentina,

An early welcome to the US!

The institution of "sworn translator" does not exist as such in the United States. If you want to certify your translation, you simply append a statement to the translation, certifying that it is accurate, and sign the statement. You can have your signature notarized, if you want to make it look more "official", but this is usually not a requirement.

However, the American Translators Association (atanet.org) offers certification examinations in various language combinations, including English>Italian.

Most graduate foreign language programs in the US are oriented toward linguistics and literature studies, and there are comparatively few programs focusing purely on translation.

A few that come to mind, some of which include certificate programs:
MIIS (miis.edu)
New York University
Kent State University
University of Chicago
University of Maryland

Regards,
Rudi


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Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:25
German to English
+ ...
Graduate programs Dec 18, 2012

Valentina Costa wrote:

Second of, which are the best masters for translators and interpreters if one wants to progress in legal, financial and bank (yearly plans and similar) in the States?
I am also focusing on good (US and non) online courses. By saying good, I mean courses that provide a student with professional and accurate teaching, include internships or work experience and give the student the chance to connect with clients/agencies.



Check out
MIIS - Monterey Institute of International Studies (my alma mater, but it's been a while)
Kent State in Ohio
NYU's certificate program
University of Chicago extension's certificate program (I took a legal translation class here - the lecturers, at least in my pair, are people at the top of the profession)


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Valentina Costa  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:25
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
no such animal Dec 29, 2012

Henry Hinds wrote:

In the US there is no such thing as a sworn translator, it does not exist. There are certifications given by different government agencies for their own purposes, mostly in Spanish and occasionally a few other languages, but it is doubtful that Italian would be included anywhere. No credentials at all are required in the US to be a translator in any language, and it is a totally unregulated profession.

I would recommend that you contact other Italian translators living in the US to obtain their perspective on how you can do here. There are several who are pretty active on Proz, and I'm sure they can give you good advice.


Hello Henry, and thank you very much for sharing your knowledge.
As a matter of fact, on top of Italian and English, I did Spanish. I realized in the States there is a lot involved into the Spanish-English pair translation market, reason why I am trying to see if I can get accepted into any Master program involving this language pair.

I will for sure do a research and contact my Italian colleagues in the States via Proz!

Besides, you mentioned government agencies. Could you give a brief description on what their role is and also list couple of names so that I can start to read about them and work things around them?

Thank you very much for your help. Really appreciated!


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Valentina Costa  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:25
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
No sworn translators Dec 29, 2012

Rudolf Vedo CT wrote:

Valentina,

An early welcome to the US!

The institution of "sworn translator" does not exist as such in the United States. If you want to certify your translation, you simply append a statement to the translation, certifying that it is accurate, and sign the statement. You can have your signature notarized, if you want to make it look more "official", but this is usually not a requirement.

However, the American Translators Association (atanet.org) offers certification examinations in various language combinations, including English>Italian.

Most graduate foreign language programs in the US are oriented toward linguistics and literature studies, and there are comparatively few programs focusing purely on translation.

A few that come to mind, some of which include certificate programs:
MIIS (miis.edu)
New York University
Kent State University
University of Chicago
University of Maryland

Regards,
Rudi




Thank you Rudolf for sharing this info and for welcoming me!
I've been checking out the ATA programs for a while now, also involving Spanish. How much and how do you think an ATA certification helps in the States? I read it can be hard to get this certification, but that of course won't prevent me from trying my best to get it. I am just wondering how worth it is.

I noticed that majority of US universities programs relate to linguistics and literature studies. I am more focused on the pure translation aspect and especially into the business/law/software translation and online programs. I saw NYU-SPCS has an online course dedicated to it and I am checking if there are more than one online options similar to this..as in the States one doesn't get accepted in all universities and also the financial matter may be crucial and change from university to university.

As a result of a master, I would like to work also for governmental organizations, embassies and similar.

I hope I gave you a better overview.
Thank you again for your help!


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Valentina Costa  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:25
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
schools Dec 29, 2012

Daina Jauntirans wrote:

Valentina Costa wrote:

Second of, which are the best masters for translators and interpreters if one wants to progress in legal, financial and bank (yearly plans and similar) in the States?
I am also focusing on good (US and non) online courses. By saying good, I mean courses that provide a student with professional and accurate teaching, include internships or work experience and give the student the chance to connect with clients/agencies.



Check out
MIIS - Monterey Institute of International Studies (my alma mater, but it's been a while)
Kent State in Ohio
NYU's certificate program
University of Chicago extension's certificate program (I took a legal translation class here - the lecturers, at least in my pair, are people at the top of the profession)


Thank you so much for sharing! I am checking out now what programs they have.
Great!


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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:25
English to German
+ ...
No sworn translator, but you can obtain FBI clearance as the next step Dec 30, 2012

As soon as you have been granted citizenship, that is. The Permanent Resident status is not sufficient to apply for this status. FBI clearance will allow you access to certain government jobs, translation jobs that contain SSNs, banking informations, patient data or jobs for the military. Any translation projects that contain highly confidential information.

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Valentina Costa  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:25
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
thank you! Jan 21, 2013

Nicole Schnell wrote:

As soon as you have been granted citizenship, that is. The Permanent Resident status is not sufficient to apply for this status. FBI clearance will allow you access to certain government jobs, translation jobs that contain SSNs, banking informations, patient data or jobs for the military. Any translation projects that contain highly confidential information.


Thank you very much!


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LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:25
Russian to English
+ ...
Yes, I agree. There is no such a thing as a certified translator or a sworn translator in the US Jan 21, 2013

There are certified interpreters -- most court interpreters are certified, and only such interpreters can be used in most courts (unless the language is really rare for which no exam exits yet. Otherwise you don't need any certifications. As to certified translations: you just swear that the translation is correct and done to the best of your knowledge, and that you are fluent in both languages. If it is not correct and the translation is related to some serious matters you may be held liable. It does not happen that often, but still, there is a chance, if your translation becomes the cause of a serious financial, life loss or injury.

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