Stamped translation for university degree certificate
Thread poster: Anthe
Feb 19, 2014

I have been asked by a friend to translate her Spanish degree certificates. I have an MA in technical and specialised translation, and although I have not been working as a translator, I am able to do this. However she has asked for the translations to be stamped, and I cannot do this and do not know how to get this done. Could anyone tell me how you can get a translation "stamped"? Can I do this as a translator? Would her documents not be valid/accepted without it?
Many thanks.


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Taru Laiho
Local time: 09:29
Finnish to English
+ ...
Authorised translation Feb 19, 2014

Your friend probably means an authorised translation (also sometimes called an "official translation"), which can only be done by an authorised translator who has passed a test. Her documents might be accepted without the authorised translator's stamp (and signature) but probably not. Absolutely not if the place where she wants to use her diplomas has specifically requested authorised translations.

The best way to proceed would be to contact a local translation agency to see how the procedure goes in your country. In Finland you can get the translation done from a scanned copy, but then the original will be attached to the translation. If you want only the English authorised translation, the authorised translator will have to see the original hard copies of the documents.


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Fiona Grace Peterson  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 08:29
Member
Italian to English
Sworn translation, perhaps Feb 19, 2014

She may mean a sworn translation; here in Italy this is done by going to the courthouse, filling out a form and declaring that the translation is a faithful rendition of the original. The document is stamped various times and duty stamps need to be attached as well.

I would advise asking your friend precisely what is required, as requirements vary from country to country.


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LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:29
Russian to English
+ ...
You cannot get a translation stamped, usually, especially in Feb 20, 2014

Anthe wrote:

I have been asked by a friend to translate her Spanish degree certificates. I have an MA in technical and specialised translation, and although I have not been working as a translator, I am able to do this. However she has asked for the translations to be stamped, and I cannot do this and do not know how to get this done. Could anyone tell me how you can get a translation "stamped"? Can I do this as a translator? Would her documents not be valid/accepted without it?
Many thanks.

Europ and Canada. A certified translator has to translate it and then stamp it. In the US it is easier, if you feel you are qualified to translate it you may execute a sworn affidavit that you translated this document,being fully qualified to do so, and sign it in front of a notary public, but even then university degrees may have to be translated only by certain affiliated agencies-- many universities will not accept translations done by just any translator.


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Anthe
TOPIC STARTER
United Kingdom Feb 20, 2014

Thank you for the answers, I live in the UK - do you know how it works there?

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Diana Coada  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:29
Portuguese to English
+ ...
I see you're in the UK Feb 20, 2014

I always ask: ''by stamped/authorised/sworn etc. do you mean certified or notarised? Please check back with the institution asking for the translation.''

Having said that, here it goes:

Certified translation - the translator adds a declaration at the end of the translation that they are qualified and that the translation of the document is accurate and true to the best of the translator's knowledge.

Notarised translation - sometimes required by legal bodies. The process is the same as above, but the declaration is signed in the presence of a notary public in order to confirm that you are who you say you are, which is then confirmed by the notary's stamp and signature. Additional costs for notary public fees apply.

NB: Sworn translators are on the list of a country's embassy or are authorised by a country's ministry to stamp their translations. In countries that don't have sworn translators, and that is the case of the UK, any professional translator (MA, BA, DipTrans, MITI, etc.) can self-certify their work with a declaration and signature.


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Tim Drayton  Identity Verified
Cyprus
Local time: 09:29
Turkish to English
+ ...
Can you still do this through a solicitor? Feb 20, 2014

Diana Coada, PGDip DPSI NRPSI wrote:

I always ask: ''by stamped/authorised/sworn etc. do you mean certified or notarised? Please check back with the institution asking for the translation.''

Having said that, here it goes:

Certified translation - the translator adds a declaration at the end of the translation that they are qualified and that the translation of the document is accurate and true to the best of the translator's knowledge.

Notarised translation - sometimes required by legal bodies. The process is the same as above, but the declaration is signed in the presence of a notary public in order to confirm that you are who you say you are, which is then confirmed by the notary's stamp and signature. Additional costs for notary public fees apply.

NB: Sworn translators are on the list of a country's embassy or are authorised by a country's ministry to stamp their translations. In countries that don't have sworn translators, and that is the case of the UK, any professional translator (MA, BA, DipTrans, MITI, etc.) can self-certify their work with a declaration and signature.


RE: "Certified translation - the translator adds a declaration at the end of the translation that they are qualified and that the translation of the document is accurate and true to the best of the translator's knowledge."

The last time I was freelancing in the UK (2002), you could then take this to any solicitor, who would add their certification for a fee of about twenty pounds. Perhaps this option is no longer available.


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:29
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
You can still take it to a solicitor in the UK Feb 20, 2014

I did this a few times last year. But I usually only have to pay 5-10 GBP for it.

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Tim Drayton  Identity Verified
Cyprus
Local time: 09:29
Turkish to English
+ ...
Best option? Feb 20, 2014

Jack Doughty wrote:

I did this a few times last year. But I usually only have to pay 5-10 GBP for it.


This may be the best option, then. You get some pretty impressive looking solicitor's stamps on the work and I have never had any negative feedback from clients about work delivered this way - and I used to do this several times a month - so I can only presume that they experienced no problems with the authority requiring a stamped translation - and some of these clients were even in the USA (although I do not think this would work for clients in a civil law jurisdiction where there are strict rules about certified translations).


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Peter Shortall  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:29
Member
French to English
+ ...
Stamps in the UK Feb 20, 2014

As this is something of a grey area in the UK, where the profession is not regulated by law, the first thing I would do is advise your friend to ask whoever wants the stamped translation to specify what kind of stamp should be used. Even within this country, unfortunately, requirements can vary from one institution to the next. I'll give you a couple of examples from my own experience.

Last year I translated some certificates for someone who wanted to register with the General Medical Council. I pointed out that although I am a member of the Institute of Linguists, I had no stamp (at the time!), so I advised him to contact the GMC and ask for details of what they would and wouldn't accept. He did this, but asked me to go ahead with the translation in the meantime, as he felt sure I met the main requirement (member of a recognised professional body).

Later it transpired that a stamp was definitely required, so I simply ordered one from a stationery company. If you're a member of the IOL, you can contact them to request a "button logo" which you are then allowed to use on your stationery.

Armed with my new piece of equipment, I stamped the translations and they were eventually accepted. Hooray!

But on another occasion, I translated a certificate for a dentist who wanted to register with a primary care trust in the West Midlands. The translation was rejected on the grounds that the PCT wanted the translation to be issued and stamped by the French university where the dentist had studied(!) - which would be like asking a British university to issue a foreign-language translation of a degree certificate it had issued (some hope!) Which, as he pointed out, was an impossible task. I don't know whether he ever managed to register in the end.

So before you go off to see a solicitor, I would check what is actually necessary. You've only mentioned "stamped" so far, and I don't see any reason (yet) to assume that the stamp has to belong to a solicitor or a notary. I believe full ITI members (MITI) are given their own stamps, for example, but you could also do what I did, if that will be acceptable to whoever it is.

[Edited at 2014-02-20 13:36 GMT]


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Maxi Schwarz
Local time: 01:29
German to English
+ ...
It depends on country and circumstance Feb 20, 2014

As some of our colleagues have already indicated, it varies from country to country. Here in Canada, I am certified under the CTTIC / ATIO and hold legal rights to use my personal certification number and stamp as long as I am a member in good standing. I can only use it for my OWN translations, since I am certifying that the person doing the translation (me) is certified, it is correct etc. I can also only certify translations that I have done in my own language pairs for which I have been certified.

Sometimes clients ask me to certify their translations, thinking they can save money. (Usually they're not correct anyway). I can't do that. But I can proofread and REDO a translation, so that it becomes mine, and offer a discount that way.

Barring that kind of certification, there is the stamp by a notary public, who charges a fee. In that case, the translator (not the client) must go to the notary and swear in front of him or her that it is a true translation etc. If going that route, you have to figure in the notary's charge, plus probably your traveling time to and from. I have an arrangement with an agency for those kinds of translations: they figure in about $100 extra that they pay their translators for this alone, on top of the translation.
----------------------
Re: circumstance - it also depends on where the translation is going. Who will be examining it, in what country? Again with the example in Canada - My stamp is useless if going to Germany since the German officials are looking for the stamp of their "geeidigte" (sworn) translators. Canada returns the favour. If a German sworn translator affixes his/her stamp on a translation, the Canadian officials won't accept it, because they want a Canadian certified translator. Etc.

When asked for a certified (stamped) translation, I always ask the client where it will be going. If outside Canada, I ask them to check what the examining officials will want to see.

Sorry about the length.


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Davidrainey
Australia
He will be needing to hire a translation agency...!! Feb 21, 2014

Anthe wrote:

I have been asked by a friend to translate her Spanish degree certificates. I have an MA in technical and specialised translation, and although I have not been working as a translator, I am able to do this. However she has asked for the translations to be stamped, and I cannot do this and do not know how to get this done. Could anyone tell me how you can get a translation "stamped"? Can I do this as a translator? Would her documents not be valid/accepted without it?
Many thanks.


Hello Anthe, Your friend will ne needing a translation agency to translate these documents. Then only the documents will be valid for the authorities.


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Jenn Mercer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:29
Member (2009)
French to English
Puzzling Feb 21, 2014

Davidrainey wrote:

Anthe wrote:

I have been asked by a friend to translate her Spanish degree certificates. I have an MA in technical and specialised translation, and although I have not been working as a translator, I am able to do this. However she has asked for the translations to be stamped, and I cannot do this and do not know how to get this done. Could anyone tell me how you can get a translation "stamped"? Can I do this as a translator? Would her documents not be valid/accepted without it?
Many thanks.


Hello Anthe, Your friend will ne needing a translation agency to translate these documents. Then only the documents will be valid for the authorities.


There is nothing inherent in a translation agency that would make a translation certified, authorized, or sworn.


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Diana Coada  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:29
Portuguese to English
+ ...
And why exactly? Feb 22, 2014

Davidrainey wrote:
Hello Anthe, Your friend will ne needing a translation agency to translate these documents. Then only the documents will be valid for the authorities.


Puzzling indeed!


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Miguel Carmona  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:29
English to Spanish
What? Feb 22, 2014

Davidrainey wrote:
Hello Anthe, Your friend will ne needing a translation agency to translate these documents. Then only the documents will be valid for the authorities.


What kind of official institutions do you think agencies are?


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Stamped translation for university degree certificate

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