How to establish myself as a translator
Thread poster: ramanasays
ramanasays
India
Nov 6, 2014

Hi Friends,

I have been forced to enter into this translation field, but till now I am about to know the entire details regarding translation. Is there ant certification necessary for translation and if it is so then what are all the courses offered for this?

What about the certificate translations and is there any authorization needed for the same and if so then what is the details behind it?


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Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 11:07
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
Welcome! Nov 7, 2014

How very strange to have been forced to be a translator - I do hope you didn't mean that literally. I can't help feeling that to be a freelancer of any type you need to be strongly motivated to succeed in your business, and that a grudging acceptance of a freelance translator's career is going to make it difficult for you to build a solid client base.

Do you have to have qualifications? No. Are they recommended? Yes. But without knowing your language pairs it's difficult to advise. You DO often need specific registration to provide certificate translations as they often need official stamps.

I suggest you browse the forums here and visit the Site Guidance Centre (under the "About" tab). Whether you have a qualification or not, you need a lot of information if you are going to successfully launch a business. Malinformed freelancers are at the mercy of ill-intentioned agency owners.


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Merab Dekano  Identity Verified
Spain
Member (2014)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Persevere Nov 7, 2014

ramanasays wrote:

Hi Friends,

I have been forced to enter into this translation field, but till now I am about to know the entire details regarding translation. Is there ant certification necessary for translation and if it is so then what are all the courses offered for this?

What about the certificate translations and is there any authorization needed for the same and if so then what is the details behind it?


A general advice would be: persevere! Build your way through gradually, constantly and consistently.

Translators, especially in competitive language pairs, need the confidence of an opera singer. You will be "booed" at times, but do not walk away from stage as Roberto Alagna did in La Scala.

Whether you are successful or not in a long run will be determined not by what you are actually translating now ("stage time"), but what you are doing as a preparatory process ("rehearsals"). The latter comprises, but is not limited to: reading, software skills, glossary management, marketing strategy, networking, reviewing grammar and style guides to avoid pitfalls, being aware of trends the industry is going through, business-related skills, you name it. This is not a "lost time", it is what makes you a translator.

[Edited at 2014-11-07 10:11 GMT]


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 12:07
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
More knowledge about you would be useful Nov 8, 2014

Welcome!

Many people have started out in translation more or less willingly, but most of us on this site enjoy it, so I hope eventually you will too.

If not, there ARE other ways of earning a living... which may even be better paid.

Try to link up with others who work with the same languages as you do.
Many translators are happy to help colleagues. If you specialise in a particular subject area, it might be a good idea to work with others who know the same languages but different specialist areas. Or perhaps the same subjects, but different languages. Then you are really colleagues and not competitors.

Many translators work only into their native languages, and some feel very strongly about it, so you need to be aware of that. I believe some can in fact translate both ways with a little help from a proofreader. They have usually lived in both countries and really studied the languages and often their specialist subjects as well.

It is necessary to find a specialist subject area or two. It could be something you know about from an earlier career, an area where you can find clients who will pay, or just something you are interested in.
In the first two cases you may be able to find contacts and clients who need translations and will pay you.
While no specific training is required, some kind of training, both in your languages and your subject areas, will become more and more necessary. But you can study at home and learn along the way - a translator can never stop learning and studying anyway!

Ask again if you have specific questions, and good luck!


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