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Are Almeda University online degrees recognized?
Thread poster: Dina Abdo

Dina Abdo  Identity Verified
Palestine
Local time: 15:11
Member (2005)
Arabic
+ ...
Mar 14, 2006

Hi,

I was wondering if any of you heard of Almeda University and their online degrees granted through their assessment committee.

What kind of degrees are those? Are they recognized? Is that a usual system accepted for giving degrees?

Thank you all in advance

[Subject edited by staff or moderator 2006-03-14 18:19]


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Becky Katz  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:11
English to Spanish
+ ...
List of ATA approved schools Mar 14, 2006

Dina

I never heard of it. Check out this link to the American Translators Association list of approved schools. It may be interesting.

http://www.atanet.org/acc/Approved_Schools.htm

good luck
Becky


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 06:11
English to Spanish
+ ...
Research it Mar 14, 2006

Just put it into Google, you'll find it. Also look for sources of information other their own site, and on the organizations that have "accredited" them.

Myself, I've never heard of it and in a cursory check of their site, cannot determine even where it is located. Maybe if you look further you can.


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Dina Abdo  Identity Verified
Palestine
Local time: 15:11
Member (2005)
Arabic
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Well ... this isn't the point actually! Mar 14, 2006

Becky and Henry,

Thank you both for your response. The thing isn't about the university itself. I know it exists and I checked their web site. Sorry if I wasn't clear enough before, but I'm trying to find out whether their degrees are recognized.

Let me change my question:

Some degrees offered online aren't based on attending courses or exams. As in Almeda University, they offer degrees on experience basis! "No courses, no study, no exams, we give you a degree for what you already know!!" This is the general idea there! I applied thinking that I'll be studying for a specific degree, but when I sent my resume they just sent me an e-mail a couple of days later telling me that; according to their assessment committee, I qualified for their degree and I can pay $XXX to get my certificate! Just that easy!

Now I don't really know how these things go in Europe or U.S. or any other parts in the world. But ... is that normal?? Submitting a resume and getting a degree just according to it?

Ever heard of a similar system??

[Edited at 2006-03-14 18:10]


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Angela Arnone  Identity Verified
Local time: 14:11
Member (2004)
Italian to English
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I've edited your post title Mar 14, 2006

Hope this helps!
Ciao
Angela

Dina Abdo wrote:
Sorry if I wasn't clear enough before, but I'm trying to find out whether their degrees are recognized.


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Dina Abdo  Identity Verified
Palestine
Local time: 15:11
Member (2005)
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Thank you :) Mar 14, 2006

Angela Arnone wrote:

Hope this helps!
Ciao
Angela



Should be much better I guess


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Sarah McGrane Gonzalez
Local time: 13:11
Spanish to English
Be very wary!! Mar 14, 2006

I have never heard of a procedure such as this for awarding degrees and would assume that such a degree would not be recognised by any discerning employer.

Throughout my education we were always told when choosing courses to pay careful attention to who the awarding/certifying body is behind the degree and this may be an important clue in finding out how viable this qualiification is. What actually is printed on the degree cert, is it just a cert which could be printed off a computer or is there a recognised seal, accrediting entity etc on the document.

Another major concern would be if these are issued on the basis of your resume what proof do they have of qualifications. If they have no proof of any of their "graduates" qualifications this could lead to potential scandals in the industry linked to this establishment and you don't want to put yourself in the same category as other potentially dubious characters when quite obviously you are not.

To be honest, as far as I'm concerned a qualification is something we all had to achieve through hard work and committment and this is what confers the value on said document. The internet industry is taking advantage of our ever demanding professional environment and I would be afraid in this case you would be left with a degree which as the saying goes is literallly "not worth the paper it's written on".

I can't tell you what to do in this case but extreme caution would be advised and the very best of luck of course.

Sarah


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Sven Wagener  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:11
Member (2007)
English to German
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Apparently a so-called diploma mill Mar 14, 2006

I can't provide you with any first hand experience, but I have found a few articles on the Internet, which indicate that it is rather dodgy.

http://www.citylinkmagazine.com/archives/101503coverstory.html

http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,66476,00.html

HTH
Sven


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Woodstock  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:11
German to English
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Could be a diploma mill Mar 14, 2006

Dina Abdo wrote:

This is the general idea there! I applied thinking that I'll be studying for a specific degree, but when I sent my resume they just sent me an e-mail a couple of days later telling me that; according to their assessment committee, I qualified for their degree and I can pay $XXX to get my certificate! Just that easy!

Now I don't really know how these things go in Europe or U.S. or any other parts in the world. But ... is that normal?? Submitting a resume and getting a degree just according to it?

Ever heard of a similar system??

[Edited at 2006-03-14 18:10]


Be very careful about this. Here's an article about so-called "diploma mills". Now this may not be one, but it sounds more than a little suspicious.
http://www.lasvegasmercury.com/2004/MERC-Jan-01-Thu-2004/22879236.html

You can get a lot more Google hits by searching "diploma mills", which are scams. There are lots and lots of them, so research carefully and look for "accredited universities" or the links to various language associations which - I'm pretty sure - there's a list of here on ProZ, and as already suggested. They can name reputable, accredited schools or courses of study. Wikipedia is often a good source for general information and links, too.

HTH
Woodstock

On edit: Yes, under "Community" tab above there's a menu item called Organizations, which is a list of different organizations serving the translating industry. I think the list of associations is there, too, but I only took a really quick look. Good luck.

[Edited at 2006-03-14 19:12]


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Dina Abdo  Identity Verified
Palestine
Local time: 15:11
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Arabic
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Exactly! Mar 14, 2006

Sarah McGrane Gonzalez wrote:

To be honest, as far as I'm concerned a qualification is something we all had to achieve through hard work and committment and this is what confers the value on said document. The internet industry is taking advantage of our ever demanding professional environment and I would be afraid in this case you would be left with a degree which as the saying goes is literallly "not worth the paper it's written on".

Sarah


That's why I was amazed when I first got their response! I believe you're right. I need to keep checking on that matter before going on with it.

Although it sounds like fun having a degree for cash from the comfort of my own home


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Dina Abdo  Identity Verified
Palestine
Local time: 15:11
Member (2005)
Arabic
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TOPIC STARTER
Both links make sense to me! Mar 14, 2006

Sven Wagener wrote:

I can't provide you with any first hand experience, but I have found a few articles on the Internet, which indicate that it is rather dodgy.

http://www.citylinkmagazine.com/archives/101503coverstory.html

http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,66476,00.html

HTH
Sven


THANK YOU!


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Dina Abdo  Identity Verified
Palestine
Local time: 15:11
Member (2005)
Arabic
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Interesting! Mar 14, 2006

Woodstock wrote:

http://www.lasvegasmercury.com/2004/MERC-Jan-01-Thu-2004/22879236.html

You can get a lot more Google hits by searching "diploma mills", which are scams.



I had no idea things can go so far!

Woodstock wrote:

there's a list of here on ProZ, and as already suggested. They can name reputable, accredited schools or courses of study. Wikipedia is often a good source for general information and links, too.



I guess I'll start my search there from now on before searching my e-mail ads Thanks for the tip


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Dees  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:11
English to French
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Yes, please be very careful! Mar 14, 2006

Hello,

I fully support my colleagues and would advise against it.

When I first read your post, it reminded me straight away of a series of identical spam emails I used to receive on a previous email address (that address attracted so much spam that I had to give it up!).

Those emails offered exactly what you're mentioning here. So please be very careful!

All the best,
Mitsuko


[Edited at 2006-03-14 19:19]


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Dina Abdo  Identity Verified
Palestine
Local time: 15:11
Member (2005)
Arabic
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I think I'm getting it clear now! Mar 14, 2006

Mitsuko Moine wrote:

I fully support my colleagues and would advise against it.


Those emails offered exactly what you're mentioning here. So please be very careful!
[/quote]

I'm not the only one who met with that AD, and it's not the only AD out there either. I guess I'll have to re-install my pop-ups blocker before I start following all those exciting advertisments

Thanks Mitsuko


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xxxsarahl
Local time: 05:11
English to French
+ ...
mail-order degrees Mar 14, 2006

are a common scam.

Say, Dina, why don't you just sign up for school in an English-speaking country to have immersion too?


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