translation of video games
Thread poster: simona dachille

simona dachille  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:42
Italian to English
Sep 10, 2006

I am ineterested in entering the field of translation for video games. Where does one start to look and get experience ?

 

Hynek Palatin  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 02:42
English to Czech
+ ...
translation of video games Sep 11, 2006

Are you sure there's demand in your language pair? Video games are usually translated from English.

You could try to find Italian game studios and offer your services directly to them. Your subtitling experience will definitely be a plus. You can also contact agencies that specialize in localization of video games.

You'll also need some knowledge of computers and consoles - and video games, of course.icon_smile.gif


 

simona dachille  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:42
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
thank you!! Sep 11, 2006

Hynek Palatin wrote:

Are you sure there's demand in your language pair? Video games are usually translated from English.

You could try to find Italian game studios and offer your services directly to them. Your subtitling experience will definitely be a plus. You can also contact agencies that specialize in localization of video games.

You'll also need some knowledge of computers and consoles - and video games, of course.icon_smile.gif


 

Simon Mountifield  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:42
French to English
My experience Sep 11, 2006

Hello Simonski,

If you do manage to break into the video games sector, you'll find it extremely varied and rewarding (not financially speaking, unfortunately), especially if you enjoy that sort of thing (like me). Translations cover a very wide range, such as user guides, storylines, voice-overs, walkthroughs, interfaces and websites (if you're lucky enough, you get a free copy of the game to help the translation process)!!

In terms of gaining experience, I think it definitely helps to be a gaming fan. In my case, I've been interested in video games since I was a kid (I'm now 34) - it also pays to be familiar with all the different platforms on the market (PC, PSP, Xbox, etc.) and the different game types (FPS, RPG, etc.). The manuals that come with the games and consoles are a good source of terminology and information. A lot of work comes from RPG games due to the extensive storylines involved - an added bonus is that a lot of RPG games run into plenty of sequels, so if you work on one, you'll be used for all the rest!

As for breaking into the sector, Hynek is right about contacting the agencies that specialise in video games. I was fortunate enough to work for an agency that won a contract with a games publisher. Although the majority of gaming stuff is translated from English, more and more European companies are muscling in on the market, meaning that there is a growing demand for translations into English. If you've got the experience, go for it and hopefully one of the many agencies contacted will have something for you.

Good luck,

Simon


[Edited at 2006-09-11 12:43]


 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

translation of video games

Advanced search







TM-Town
Manage your TMs and Terms ... and boost your translation business

Are you ready for something fresh in the industry? TM-Town is a unique new site for you -- the freelance translator -- to store, manage and share translation memories (TMs) and glossaries...and potentially meet new clients on the basis of your prior work.

More info »
WordFinder Unlimited
For clarity and excellence

WordFinder is the leading dictionary service that gives you the words you want anywhere, anytime. Access 260+ dictionaries from the world's leading dictionary publishers in virtually any device. Find the right word anywhere, anytime - online or offline.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search