Interpreting for videoconferencing: technical considerations
Thread poster: David BUICK

David BUICK  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:25
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Jun 24, 2011

I've done a couple of jobs involving interpreting for videoconferencing/webcasting. More often than not, the results have been inconclusive from a technical point of view.

I have the prospect of organising the interpreting for a videoconference between two venues coming up in a few months and I'd be interested to hear of others' experiences/technical insights.

I'm talking about high-end technical resources, ie not Skype: dedicated videoconferencing facilities over a vir
... See more
I've done a couple of jobs involving interpreting for videoconferencing/webcasting. More often than not, the results have been inconclusive from a technical point of view.

I have the prospect of organising the interpreting for a videoconference between two venues coming up in a few months and I'd be interested to hear of others' experiences/technical insights.

I'm talking about high-end technical resources, ie not Skype: dedicated videoconferencing facilities over a virtual private network.

For instance, for videoconferencing with simultaneous translation: have people experienced using interpreters at one venue (with suitable audio feed to the other end), at both venues, or in a third location?

Your ideas and insights welcome!
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Claudia Brauer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:25
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Video remote interpreting Jun 24, 2011

I have done video interpreting for decades, even before video conferencing was a popular thing. I used to work for BP Exploration in Latin America and we used to do a lot of video conferencing using simultaneous interpreting. Their secure line was very good at the time and I don't recall any difference at all between "regular" conference interpreting (like seminars) and these video interpretations. I have also been widely exposed to video conferencing for the healthcare industry, a very novel... See more
I have done video interpreting for decades, even before video conferencing was a popular thing. I used to work for BP Exploration in Latin America and we used to do a lot of video conferencing using simultaneous interpreting. Their secure line was very good at the time and I don't recall any difference at all between "regular" conference interpreting (like seminars) and these video interpretations. I have also been widely exposed to video conferencing for the healthcare industry, a very novel but now commercially available solution, and it works very well (video remote interpreting for LEP, which may also used for the deaf). So, in terms of technical equipment, it is already in existence and in very reliable quality. If you google "video remote interpreting equipment" you will find a lot about this issue. Hope it helps.Collapse


 

Priscila Siu  Identity Verified
Costa Rica
Local time: 22:25
English to Spanish
+ ...
video conference Jun 24, 2011

You would have a professional video conference equipment and team (technician) in both ends to receive and transmit the remote signal.

Both ends may or may not have or require the usual translating team and equipment.

If you are organizing the event but do not own equipment, you can rent it for the event. I dont know your location, but I could be of more assistance if you email me. pristraduc@yahoo.com


 

David BUICK  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:25
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
How does the sound work? Jun 25, 2011

Thanks for sharing!

For the job coming up, the client at my venue claims to have a videoconferencing facility, which I suspect features a screen plus one omnidirectional microphone and speakers, and I expect it will be something similar at the other end.

I was once engaged to do simultaneous interpreting whispering (no equipment) in this set-up, which quickly foundered because the omnidirectional mike picked everything up.

In your experience, did everybody
... See more
Thanks for sharing!

For the job coming up, the client at my venue claims to have a videoconferencing facility, which I suspect features a screen plus one omnidirectional microphone and speakers, and I expect it will be something similar at the other end.

I was once engaged to do simultaneous interpreting whispering (no equipment) in this set-up, which quickly foundered because the omnidirectional mike picked everything up.

In your experience, did everybody have their own microphone and headset, and were you in a separate room with your own signal, or what?
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Interpreting for videoconferencing: technical considerations

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