Question about language combinations for conference/diplomatic interpreting
Thread poster: Audra deFalco

Audra deFalco
United States
Local time: 13:04
Italian to English
+ ...
Dec 10, 2013

Hello all! I've got a quick question about language combinations when it comes to conference interpreting.

I've been a translator since 2003 and have been officially certified to interpret within the court system here in New York since 2012, though I've been interpreting before then on and off without formal training. My ultimate goal is to interpret for an organization like the European Union or the United Nations.

The crux of the matter is this: seeing as I have dual U.S. Italian citizenship, I want to go to school in either an English speaking country in Europe or in Italy. England might be prohibitively expensive for me what with the Pound, and as I've already lived, worked and studied in Italy I would love to go back. I have plenty of time to consider my options as I'll be finishing my education in the Netherlands; in the meantime, I'll be spending my time honing my linguistic skills and continuing to work in the field.

Are there any schools that offer the following combinations in either Italy or elsewhere?

A- ENGLISH (or Italian if, obviously, I were to go to school in Italy)
B- ITALIAN/ENGLISH (depending on my choice for my A language)
C- SPANISH
C- FRENCH

or

A- ENGLISH (or Italian if I'm studying in Italy)
C- ITALIAN/ENGLISH
C- SPANISH
C- FRENCH

It's possible that one day after years of study I would add Dutch but I don't want to get too ahead of myself! Thanks.


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fhareau
Belgium
English to French
+ ...
combination Apr 7, 2014

You should keep your combination as simple as possible for training, you can always add or upgrade later. Most schools like to keep their students at ACC(C), ABC, or AB/AA. Plenty of people train in a school with an ACC combination where their third C isn't offered, they just start working with it or get accredited with it later.

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Joanna Spychala
Poland
Local time: 19:04
English to Polish
+ ...
Choose your A Apr 8, 2014

Most importantly, you have to decide what your A language is - that's the one you're most comfortable with and which, consequently, gives you the best chances for successful graduation.

I don't know the specific offer of interpreting schools in Italy but it might be well possible to study there as an English A - that's worth checking. You might want to consider other countries, too (ESIT in Paris is a state school that offers great quality of education and is not prohibitively expensive).

ABCC sounds ambitious but not impossible. I would not drop a B at this stage as in my opinion it is much easier to add another C language on your own than to add a B (you need a lot of feedback here!).

Do you know the website interpreting.info? Consider asking your question there!


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mjbjosh
Local time: 19:04
English to Latvian
+ ...
H i Apr 12, 2014



Are there any schools that offer the following combinations in either Italy or elsewhere?

A- ENGLISH (or Italian if, obviously, I were to go to school in Italy)
B- ITALIAN/ENGLISH (depending on my choice for my A language)
C- SPANISH
C- FRENCH

or

A- ENGLISH (or Italian if I'm studying in Italy)
C- ITALIAN/ENGLISH
C- SPANISH
C- FRENCH

It's possible that one day after years of study I would add Dutch but I don't want to get too ahead of myself! Thanks.


The language profile you describe above is not at all interesting for the EU, we have tons of French fries interpreters (FR IT ES). Rather try to learn German, Dutch is not that far away.


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Audra deFalco
United States
Local time: 13:04
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks :) Apr 14, 2014

Hi and thanks! I was under the impression that an English A MUST either have French or German as a C, so it's either/or. I'd much rather go with French first because it's what I already know. I can always add German later.

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LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:04
Russian to English
+ ...
Hi. Apr 15, 2014

If you want to work for the UN, Italian is not an official language. You would need English and French (from your combinations) and Spanish-- as another language required. You don''t really need any special degrees--just any college degree--BA at least and pass the exam, which is quite hard. You may check their site for more information.


[Edited at 2014-04-15 20:02 GMT]


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ahowell  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 13:04
Japanese to English
+ ...
Post-grad. T&I training in the US Apr 15, 2014

I went to the Monterey Institute of International Studies in Monterey, California and I completed their two-year GSTI (Graduate School of Translation and Interpreting) program. I don't believe Italian was one of the languages taught there though it might have changed since then. When I was enrolled in the program, they offered Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, German and Russian. It was a tremendously rigourous program but you learn sooooooooooo much from it. Check it out. Hope this helps!

http://www.miis.edu/academics/programs/translationinterpretation/faculty


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Audra deFalco
United States
Local time: 13:04
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Apr 16, 2014

Hi and thanks!

I will be living in Europe, so that's out of the question for me (and besides, it's prohibitively expensive for me... sadly!). I am not as interested in working in the UN as I am interested in working in the EU, for the record. The UN is almost an afterthought to focus on should I ever move back to the US.


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