Why japanese to English translation is priced with target word??
Thread poster: Capita

Capita
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:25
Member (2012)
English to Bulgarian
Jul 21, 2009

Why Japanese to English translation are priced on the target word, what is the dis-advantage of having a price for source characters like the other languages.

Please throw some light.


Kind regards,

Arun Prabhu
Resource Relationship Manager


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conejo  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 18:25
Member (2003)
Japanese to English
+ ...
Depends on document format and agency requirements Jul 21, 2009

If the document is in scanned PDF format (a scanned piece of paper) or PowerPoint, that the source characters cannot be counted easily. So in those cases, it makes no sense to set the price in source characters.

If the document is in a format in which the source characters can be counted easily, electronically, and accurately, then there is no reason why a source character count could not be used, in my opinion.

It depends on the agency's requirements also... some agencies only want quotes in source characters or target words.

Me personally, I am flexible for what the client needs. But, if the client has a 200-page document that is scanned pieces of paper in PDF, I don't quote in source characters because it would take a long time (that is not paid) to accurately count all that.

Another thing I've run into is, some agencies that don't deal with Asian languages very often want to have a quote in target English words, because they don't know how to count in source characters, and they want to have a comparison that can be made with the prices of European languages. I.e.: If you say it's $0.XX per English target word, they can say OK, I can see how this is comparing with the price of say, German>English.

Normally, I quote in target English words. But it doesn't really matter as long as the document is countable electronically. I think it just depends on what the agency wants and what the translator is used to.



[Edited at 2009-07-21 17:20 GMT]


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Alex Farrell  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 09:25
Japanese to English
Typically by source character in Japan Jul 22, 2009

Like conejo said, it depends on familiarity with Asian languages, or even familiarity with Japanese. Even many Chinese agencies seem to pay by target English word. But unless it's a scanned PDF, all Japanese agencies I've worked with pay according to Japanese source characters.

- Alex


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Geraldine Oudin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Japanese to French
+ ...
Not so often Jul 22, 2009

I know only one Japanese agency which requires quotes in target words (including for combinaisons which does not include Japanese), and I have no idea why they work this way. That's the way they count, regardless of the source document being a scanned PDF or the usual Word or Excel file.

All I know is that it can be tricky since the ratio between source Japanese words and (in my case, French) target words can vary depending on the type of document. Sometimes you end up earning less...sometimes you end up earning more.


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Capita
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:25
Member (2012)
English to Bulgarian
TOPIC STARTER
what will be the difference in amount by charging for Source Characher compared to the target word?? Jul 22, 2009

Thank you for the responce,

We have the right technology to count the Japanese or Korean characters, We suggest linguist to charge by source characters but still we have majority of the linguist who prefer to get paid for the target word.

What will be the difference in amount by charging for Source Characher compared to the target word??



Kind regards,

Arun Prabhu
Resource Relationship Manager


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conejo  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 18:25
Member (2003)
Japanese to English
+ ...
Japanese to English ratio Jul 22, 2009

ALSYI wrote:
What will be the difference in amount by charging for Source Characher compared to the target word??


It varies a little up or down depending on the way the translator translates, the field, and the type of writing the source document requires, but a good general calculation method is:

2 Japanese source characters = 1 English target word.
So, for example, if a translator normally charges $0.12 per English target word, the equivalent price would be about $0.06 per Japanese source character.

Some translators may have different price structures, but the above is a good benchmark.


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Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:25
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
This is a recurring topic, see previous discussions Jul 22, 2009

I think you can find good information in these previous threads:

http://www.proz.com/forum/japanese_日本語/94795-rates_for_translation_from_japanese_help_with_calculation.html

http://www.proz.com/forum/japanese_日本語/56772-converting_jpn_chars_to_eng_words.html

Katalin


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