Is there a college that offers a online degree in Japanese Language?
Thread poster: Ramex
Ramex
United States
Local time: 06:19
Aug 17

As the title states. I am trying to see if there is any college/school/program that offers a online degree as a certificate, associate degree, bachelor degree, or masters degree in Japanese Language?

I currently haven't found any. Been contemplating that it might be better to self teach myself because it seems majority of jobs only require a high school diploma and that you are actually fluent in that language. A profiency test N1 and ATA certification could probably solidify this.


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Lincoln Hui  Identity Verified
Hong Kong
Local time: 19:19
Member
Chinese to English
+ ...
Not sure what you're looking for Aug 18

I would say that N1 certification says more about proficiency (at least on the reading side) than a US degree. I would also say it also doesn't say very much either.

[Edited at 2017-08-18 04:41 GMT]


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Ramex
United States
Local time: 06:19
TOPIC STARTER
Let me be less specific Aug 18

Lincoln Hui wrote:

I would say that N1 certification says more about proficiency (at least on the reading side) than a US degree. I would also say it doesn't mean a whole lot anyway.


Is there a college that offers a Online bachelors degree in Japanese Language?

[Edited at 2017-08-18 04:46 GMT]


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Allyson Larimer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 06:19
Japanese to English
+ ...
Difficult Question, Complex Answer Aug 18

I found a few universities that offer online classes, though I can't find a degree program that is entirely online.
http://ecampus.oregonstate.edu/online-degrees/undergraduate/foreign-languages/japanese.htm
https://www.mesacc.edu/programs/japanese
http://www.umuc.edu/academic-programs/bachelors-degrees/east-asian-studies-major.cfm

Toronto offers a translation certificate program online, but you have to already know Japanese.
https://learn.utoronto.ca/courses-programs/languages-translation/courses/japanese


But if I read into your question, it sounds like you are asking what is the quickest path from no Japanese to professional translator.
Let me give you some advice. If I had to do my career all over again, I would go to an intensive language school in Japan, then go to a trade school like Simul academy, and I would probably have had my current career in 5 years, instead of 15 (studying in the US, getting N1, working my way through a Japanese company to the level of translator).

Language Schools
http://www.nichibei.ac.jp/jli/
http://www.ala-japan.com/en/

Simul Academy (trade school for translation and interpretation)
https://www.simulacademy.com/


Remember, you aren't looking at 4 years of college Japanese to become a translator. It takes far more than that. Experience in the country is essential. And N1 language skills are probably the bear minimum you need to start.


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Ramex
United States
Local time: 06:19
TOPIC STARTER
Best answer yet Aug 18

Allyson Larimer wrote:

I found a few universities that offer online classes, though I can't find a degree program that is entirely online.
http://ecampus.oregonstate.edu/online-degrees/undergraduate/foreign-languages/japanese.htm
https://www.mesacc.edu/programs/japanese
http://www.umuc.edu/academic-programs/bachelors-degrees/east-asian-studies-major.cfm

Toronto offers a translation certificate program online, but you have to already know Japanese.
https://learn.utoronto.ca/courses-programs/languages-translation/courses/japanese

Language Schools
http://www.nichibei.ac.jp/jli/
http://www.ala-japan.com/en/

Simul Academy (trade school for translation and interpretation)
https://www.simulacademy.com/


Thank you best answer yet and OMG you are from Ohio too! I'm just trying to determine if it is even worth getting a degree because I really don't want to go to a campus. I rather do word translation which shouldn't need to much face to face and talking. But if I would go interpreter route, I might as well move to said place. Where there is a bunch of native speakers.


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Allyson Larimer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 06:19
Japanese to English
+ ...
or stay in the U.S. Aug 24

But if I would go interpreter route, I might as well move to said place. Where there is a bunch of native speakers.


Yes and no.

You might think the demand is higher for interpreters IN Japan, but then you would be competing with all the Japanese native speakers. I think your chances are better in the U.S. where demand is high and supply is low.

Going back to the schooling topic, the first requirement is for this job is language ability. If you can come by that without going to Japan, that is fine. But you will miss a lot of cultural nuances that come from spending time in the country/around native speakers.

But when you look at a translation degree, language ability is a given. You are already supposed to have a high level of working proficiency when you start your degree. It helps you understand how to turn your second language into natural writing in your first. That is not as easy as it may sound and beginners usually need a lot of practice before they learn how much you can vary from the original while still communicating the same meaning. It has little to do with the words on the page. (Incidentally, Kent State near Cleveland has a good translation degree!)

As far as jobs are concerned, you would actually be in pretty high demand around the manufacturing centers in the U.S. I see jobs constantly for translators in Kentucky, central Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan. They don't necessarily require professional training or a degree, but you would have to be able to prove language proficiency in an interview. Also, most of these companies want a translator-interpreter, so you would have to do the spoken side as well.

On the other hand, if you want to be a freelance translator and work from home (meaning only on documents and only J>E), you don't necessarily need a certification but it would help you get your foot in the door with agencies. Without some kind of credential (JLPT N1, ATA cert, previous work experience), an agency is not likely to give you translation work.


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