What exactly IS the KudoZ glossary?
Thread poster: philgoddard
philgoddard
United States
German to English
+ ...
Oct 1, 2012

This might seem a rather basic question, but every time an asker accepts my answer, I dutifully enter it in the glossary if they haven't already done so. What would happen if I didn't bother? My answer would still come up in terminology searches, wouldn't it?

And while we're on the subject, why do askers sometimes award less than four points? Does this imply that the answer is less than perfect? I could understand it if the points were split between two or more answers, but as I understand it, that's not possible.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Lucia Leszinsky
SITE STAFF
KudoZ open glossary and grid for awarding KudoZ points Oct 1, 2012

Hello philgoddard,

The KudoZ glossary --or KudoZ open glossary-- is a glossary made of terms translated by ProZ.com translators via the KudoZ help network:

http://www.proz.com/glossary-translations/

However, for a term to be part of this glossary, it must be entered by either the asker or the selected answerer. In other words, having a KudoZ question graded is not enough for a term and its translation to be included in the KudoZ open glossary.

Now, regarding your second question, note that KudoZ askers are expected to take into consideration the following grid when deciding how many points to award to the asker who posted the most helpful answer:

  • 4 points: Answer was acceptable, explanation was good, reference was provided (or not needed).
  • 3 points: Answer was acceptable, explanation was good, but reference was lacking.
  • 2 points: Answer was acceptable.
  • 1 points: Answer was somewhat helpful.

    Hope this explains.

    Lucia

    Direct link Reply with quote
     

  • Thomas Pfann  Identity Verified
    United Kingdom
    Local time: 18:59
    Member (2006)
    English to German
    + ...
    Criteria for awarding points Oct 1, 2012

    I quite like the idea of awarding different amounts of points based on how helpful an answer actually was. Although standard procedure (and I don't do it any differently myself) seems to be to award 4 points by default.

    The KudoZ glossary almost seems a little pointless to me because, as you say, it just seems to be a duplication of the normal KudoZ entries.

    And what I find quite frustrating about the glossary entries is that a lot of non-sense makes it into the glossary. Just search for terms such as "whole sentence" or "help with sentence" to see what I mean (example). And although you can comment on glossary entries, that doesn't seem to have any effect.



    [Edited at 2012-10-01 17:45 GMT]


    Direct link Reply with quote
     
    philgoddard
    United States
    German to English
    + ...
    TOPIC STARTER
    Lucia Oct 1, 2012

    Thanks for your answer.

    I don't really understand the first part of it. You say "having a KudoZ question graded is not enough for a term and its translation to be included in the KudoZ open glossary." But it still appears in the archive of questions, so if someone searches for the term in future, they'll find it, won't they? What is the benefit of clicking on Gloss?

    I didn't know there was a scale of points depending on the quality of the answer. I don't remember seeing it when choosing answers to questions I've asked. Does it automatically appear when you award points?


    Direct link Reply with quote
     

    Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
    Spain
    Local time: 18:59
    Member (2007)
    English
    + ...
    Good question Oct 1, 2012

    philgoddard wrote:
    This might seem a rather basic question, but every time an asker accepts my answer, I dutifully enter it in the glossary if they haven't already done so. What would happen if I didn't bother? My answer would still come up in terminology searches, wouldn't it?

    I've often asked myself the same question, Phil. Of course, it does give you 10 BrowniZ points.

    I can see the sense of constructing a glossary, but the term search does seem to include all KudoZ questions/answers, even open questions.

    Like Thomas, I see no sense of glossary entries that say "see sentence", or those that concerned a typo. And I rarely add monolingual terms to the glossary, although there are exceptions to that. Very often, monolingual questions are grammar points that can be answered by (almost) any native speaker. Or questions regarding the understanding of muddled sentences.


    Direct link Reply with quote
     

    Lucia Leszinsky
    SITE STAFF
    Grading a question and adding a term to the glossary are two different things Oct 1, 2012

    philgoddard wrote:

    I don't really understand the first part of it. You say "having a KudoZ question graded is not enough for a term and its translation to be included in the KudoZ open glossary." But it still appears in the archive of questions, so if someone searches for the term in future, they'll find it, won't they? What is the benefit of clicking on Gloss?


    Sorry for apparently not making myself clear in my previous post, philgoddard. Let me try to explain how it works:

    When a KudoZ question is closed / graded, the asker is given the option to grade the question (i.e. select the most helpful answer and award the points) and enter the term into the KudoZ glossary at the same time, or else to just grade the question. If the asker selects this last option --grades the question without adding the term to the glossary-- then the most helpful answerer is given the chance to enter the term using the "Gloss" button available in the graded question. However, if neither the asker, nor the answerer enter the term into the glossary, the term and its translation will not appear as part of glossary results, even when the question was graded and closed.

    Hope this explains better. If not, please don't hesitate to let me know.

    Lucia


    Direct link Reply with quote
     

    Lucia Leszinsky
    SITE STAFF
    Ooops! I forgot to answer your second question Oct 1, 2012

    philgoddard wrote:

    I didn't know there was a scale of points depending on the quality of the answer. I don't remember seeing it when choosing answers to questions I've asked. Does it automatically appear when you award points?


    Yes, philgoddard, when you click on "Select this answer as the most helpful", you are presented with a "Submit your feedback" box in which you add a comment, select the amount of points to be awarded and, as explained above, you enter the term into the glossary (if you want). In that same box, right next to the KudoZ points drop-down menu, there is an informational icon that explains the following:

    KudoZ grading scale

    When deciding how many points to award, please consider this scale as a guideline:

    4: Answer was acceptable, explanation was good, reference was provided (or not needed).
    3: Answer was acceptable, explanation was good, but reference was lacking.
    2: Answer was acceptable.
    1: Answer was somewhat helpful.


    In fact, you can see what this informational icon includes by clicking on http://www.proz.com/inc/info/info_frame.php?info_mode=info&code=kudoz_grading_scale&v5=1

    Lucia


    Direct link Reply with quote
     

    Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
    United States
    Local time: 11:59
    English to Spanish
    + ...
    Automatic Entry Oct 1, 2012

    Maybe then it would be preferable just to automatically enter every question that has been graded into the glossary rather than depending on the asker or answerer to do so? Why not? Then at least they would all be there. Many would not be very good answers, but such is the case already. In using the glossary we all know (or should know) that it is necessary to use a lot of judgment.

    Direct link Reply with quote
     

    Mark Thompson  Identity Verified
    Brazil
    Local time: 16:59
    Member
    Portuguese to English
    Agree with Henry Oct 1, 2012

    Put it all in there - sometimes answers are not exactly what we're looking for, but can give us that little shove in the right direction, and it's always good to have alternatives we might not have thought of ourselves.

    Thanks Lucia for your great work on this site!


    Direct link Reply with quote
     

    Rolf Kern  Identity Verified
    Switzerland
    Local time: 19:59
    English to German
    + ...
    @Thomas Oct 1, 2012

    Congratulations for this post. This is one of the shortcomings of this so-called "glossary".

    Direct link Reply with quote
     

    Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
    Denmark
    Local time: 19:59
    Member (2003)
    Danish to English
    + ...
    Adding terms Oct 2, 2012

    It is one of my first ports of call when I can't find a term easily, and in my language pairs the glossary is surprisingly helpful. The group is small enough not to have too many idiotic askers, and large enough for people to have a good chance of being offered a helpful answer, so they don't give up on KudoZ too quickly.

    The good answers accumulate.

    I have to admit that once or twice I have posted a question, not because the answer was entirely impossible to find, but because I thought it would make a useful contribution to the glossary!

    Even though I have 'found the answer elsewhere', it has been related to a really impossible term, and the glossary is more complete with these clusters.

    On other occasions, I really appreciate the comments and advice of colleagues when I was fairly sure of my term, but not absolutely certain that it was the best.

    I don't regard it as a sin to post interesting questions on KudoZ like that, but of course, one person's interesting question may be another's idea of abuse...

    Those terms that are difficult to translate well - although adequate if not entirely idiomatic versions exist - can be excellent contributions to the glossary.

    At its best, it is a discussion between experts, with comments and guidance that you would not find in a dictionary or elsewhere. Its value lies as much in the comments and discussion as in the list of terms.

    The Internet has grown and evolved since KudoZ was started, and I see no reason why KudoZ should not evolve a little too. In principle you can find almost anything on the Net. But translators do not always have time to sift all the information out there, and there is no need to re-invent the wheel every time.

    I hoped that GBK would develop as a supplement, but it seemed to be a lot of hard work for a very few terms that were very rarely used, and it has gone completley quiet in recent years.

    There is always the possibility of adding terms to one's personal glossary, but I for one do not get round to it very often... I don't think others do either. I have a few small lists that started out as possible contributions, but I have never uploaded them.

    Searching people's personal glossaries does very occasionally bring up a helpful suggestion, but most of them are already in the KOG anyway.

    So there are some of my thought about the KudoZ Open Glossary.


    Direct link Reply with quote
     
    Robert Forstag  Identity Verified
    United States
    Local time: 13:59
    Member (2003)
    Spanish to English
    + ...
    Monolingual questions in English are nearly always non-Pro Oct 2, 2012

    Sheila Wilson wrote:

    [Very often, monolingual questions are grammar points that can be answered by (almost) any native speaker. Or questions regarding the understanding of muddled sentences.


    Yes indeed. Nearly all of the monolingual English questions are asked by non-natives, and any native English speaker with a high-school education is capable of providing an acceptable answer in almost all cases. And as Sheila also points out, glossary entries would not (in most instances) be of any use at all.

    By definition, therefore, such queries should be classified as "non-Pro."

    I find it disappointing that there are not more monolingual English queries at a more professional level (i.e., dealing with fine points of usage and grammar, analyzing two or more possible relatively acceptable phrasings, etc.). This represents a lost opportunity for native English speakers to hone their skills in their native tongue.

    I wonder if the situation is the same in other "monolingual pairs."


    Direct link Reply with quote
     


    To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


    You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

    What exactly IS the KudoZ glossary?

    Advanced search






    BaccS – Business Accounting Software
    Modern desktop project management for freelance translators

    BaccS makes it easy for translators to manage their projects, schedule tasks, create invoices, and view highly customizable reports. User-friendly, ProZ.com integration, community-driven development – a few reasons BaccS is trusted by translators!

    More info »
    SDL MultiTerm 2017
    Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

    SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

    More info »



    Forums
    • All of ProZ.com
    • Term search
    • Jobs
    • Forums
    • Multiple search