Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
KudoZ networking - please tell us your story
Thread poster: Henry Dotterer

Henry Dotterer
Local time: 17:33
SITE FOUNDER
Aug 5, 2005

It seems to me that one of the most interesting aspects of our workplace is the way members meet / network while answering and asking KudoZ questions.

We have some new people here in the office, working on KudoZ, and I am trying to explain this phenomenon to them. Would anyone care to share a story about how a friendship or a working relationship sprung from KudoZ?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chinoise  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:33
English to Chinese
+ ...
Interesting topic... Aug 5, 2005

From my true experience, giving "agrees" to your colleagues when you feel their answers are right can easily generate a very pleasant working relationship in the KudoZ world. Giving "neutrals' is sometimes okay. However, "disagrees" may generally be an unfriendly sign (at least to me).

Will try to think of one or more specific examples ...


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Angela Arnone  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:33
Member (2004)
Italian to English
+ ...
Perceptions Aug 5, 2005

Henry, the perceptions of what a colleague is like can often come across from how they tackle answering kudoz.
Their sense of humour, their humanity, their intelligence, their ability (or lack thereof).
I don't know where to start listing the great friends I've made, the amount of confidence I've acquired, the awareness of my lack of knowledge that led me to specialise where I could and leave the rest to experts, the confidence I've instilled in others by supporting their answers and sharing work with them, the jobs I've been offered, the patience I've had to learn (not always successful at that).
Of course there were and still are upsetting negative moments but that's life. I've argued, made the peace, grieved the passing of more than one friend and rejoiced at the birth of proz babies or proz romances.
All through kudoz, because I'm a rare contributor to forums and seldom read them unless someone points me there.
All stuff that was unthinkable less than 5 years ago. Before I stumbled across proz.

One story of many: Roberta Anderson and I met on kudoz, we organised the first ever proz non-virtual get-together (which later generated the pow-wows) and we just saw our first combined work published, with my translation into English and Robi's proofreading and DTP. A slick little Weekend Guide to Venice for one of Italy's most prestigious publishers.
Our next "weekend" will be in Turin, just in time for the 2005-6 Winter Olympics!


Angela


[Edited at 2005-08-05 22:45]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Kim Metzger  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 16:33
German to English
KudoZ networking Aug 5, 2005

I attended my first Powwow in Düsseldorf, Germany last year. I already knew 80% of the 40 or so attendees through KudoZ and was eager to attend because I wanted to meet the people I had communicated with in KudoZ in person. It was like meeting old friends because we knew each other's style, strengths and weaknesses. As chinoise says, you can make friends and even enemies in KudoZ. One of the attendees was a bitter enemy - an old hard-ass Scot with an attitude who had bombed me frequently with angry red "disagrees." When we met face to face we realized we actually had a lot in common. I'll be attending the next Düsseldorf Powwow on 29 October, and if Gareth's there, I'll buy him a beer or two.

[Edited at 2005-08-07 16:52]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chinoise  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:33
English to Chinese
+ ...
Well said! Aug 5, 2005

Angela Arnone wrote:

... the perceptions of what a colleague is like can often come across from how they tackle answering kudoz.
Their sense of humour, their humanity, their intelligence, their ability (or lack thereof)


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxsarahl
Local time: 14:33
English to French
+ ...
Brainstorming Aug 5, 2005

Hi Henry

I, for one, really enjoy helping an asker as part of a team.
It happens a lot with Lien's questions, as we are able to come up with the right answer by putting our heads together. I met a number of Prozians on these questions -starting with Lien herself- who later became friends and business partners.

We also get to meet colleagues on specialty questions -medical in my case- and as friendship develops we also toss each other a little work now and then.

This is really a fantastic networking place, thank you Henry!

Sarah


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Kim Metzger  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 16:33
German to English
The KudoZ classroom Aug 5, 2005

When I became serious about going into translation as a second career, I read articles and books on translation. I joined the ATA and the Mexican Translators' Association and attended workshops and lectures. I did voluntary translation work and worked hard to learn the skills needed to pass the ATA exam that confers certification.

But the classroom where I learned the most and quickest and had the most fun was the KudoZ classroom. When I started KudoZ I didn't even know how to copy and paste something into the explanation box. From fellow KudoZ contributors I learned Googling skills for finding KudoZ answers that have served me well in my own translation work. I learned from the answers given by others and from the peer comments on my own answers. I learned that to be a translator is to be a perfectionist. Pro translators have little patience for careless "typos". If you're going to submit an answer, do it carefully.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 23:33
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
A long time ago... Aug 6, 2005

(look at my ID number to get an idea...)

an engineer client who got fed up with my questions sent me to "this wonderful site where you get answers from specialists" (he was using it himself). Someone going by the username "ffc" bailed me out then, and some months later, I was happy to return the favour on a medical question (I will still fresh out of my hospital scholarship).

A few months later, ffc disappeared - actually, he was trudging the paper chase to set up an agency. Modest thing, really. I was one of the first translators he contacted.

Today, I doubt that he sleeps and I'd pay to get the slavedriver off my back.

Well, today only. And perhaps for the next two weeks. Because he wasn't the only one. And a lot of other water has passed under the bridge.

Sheesh.

****

Seriously, one of the best things about ProZ (not just KudoZ, most of them came from profile consultations and a few just from swapping e-mails) is how it enables you to select clients. We all think it's just job offers, a marketplace and its prices, and that clients select us, not the other way around. But there's more to how some exchanges and relationships can vibrate with life, content, meaning, humour, stories and long friendships that make you stay, and that make clients want to make you stay. In the same way as I've gained clients from colleagues kicking themselves upstairs, so to speak, I've also gained clients from what I'd call "PM migration". People become used to dealing with us as people, not just numbers, dates, deadlines and Trados quotes. They know what we're used to, and they provide feasible (if somewhat stressful on the deadline side when they're hard up) working and payment conditions. That's far higher on the Maslow scale to me than the agency that calls cold turkey and wants you in Washington for 2 hours in the middle of peak airline traffic.



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chinoise  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:33
English to Chinese
+ ...
Good point! Aug 6, 2005

That's also what I've learned through the kudoZ answering experience.

Kim Metzger wrote:
I learned that to be a translator is to be a perfectionist. Pro translators have little patience for careless "typos". If you're going to submit an answer, do it carefully.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chinoise  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:33
English to Chinese
+ ...
True! Aug 6, 2005

I second your opinion.

sarahl wrote:

This is really a fantastic networking place, thank you Henry!

Sarah


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chinoise  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:33
English to Chinese
+ ...
Exactly! Aug 6, 2005

Quite a few clients, after knowing about us through their observations in the KudoZ section, often contact us on their own initiative and treat us as real pros...

Parrot wrote:
People become used to dealing with us as people, not just numbers, dates, deadlines and Trados quotes. They know what we're used to, and they provide feasible (if somewhat stressful on the deadline side when they're hard up) working and payment conditions.


[Edited at 2005-08-06 01:03]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

paula13  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 19:33
Member (2005)
It's a great way to learn, make friends and make new clients Aug 6, 2005

I have been fortunate enough to make great friends all over the world thanks to Kudoz. I stay in touch by email with a lot of people who's questions I've answered and many of them email me directly when they have questions now. I also get a lot of help from older, more experienced translators on translation related questions and business stuff.... it's great!
Some of the people who's questions I've answered have offered me work, and whenever I need to hire a helping hand I have to admit the first people that come to mind are those who have helped me in the past.
You can tell a lot about the way people work by the way they answer kudoz. Doesn't it make sense to think that someone who takes the time to answer questions accurately and provide references probably does the same thing when they're translating? At the same time, wouldn't you think someone who answers nicely and offers you a helping hand will probably be great to work with on a big project?
I have met some of the coolest people thanks to Kudoz, so if any of them are reading (you know who you are) you guys rock!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Chinoise  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:33
English to Chinese
+ ...
So have I... Aug 6, 2005

The longer we stay here asking and answering KudoZ questions, the more genuine friends we will meet.

paula arturo wrote:
I have met some of the coolest people thanks to Kudoz, so if any of them are reading (you know who you are) you guys rock!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mats Wiman  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 23:33
Member (2000)
German to Swedish
+ ...

MODERATOR
KudoZ is the main stage Aug 6, 2005

where you really get to know the 'performers'.
Let me quote myself (Confessions...):
"Further it’s maybe the best meeting place at ProZ.com. You get to know your colleagues step by step without imposing yourself on them or being imposed by them. Most of my ProZ.com friends I have first encountered in the KudoZ arena.
When it comes to nominating moderators, KudoZ quality and behaviour is often one important yardstick.
If you want to try a team effort one of the more common tools is to see how your prospect partner comes through in the KudoZ arena."

Mats



[Edited at 2005-08-06 06:30]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Michael Deliso  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:33
Italian to English
+ ...
Here is mine.. Aug 6, 2005

My...other...two cents
Great! The contribution that Kudoz brings to anyone is way too obvious.
I don’t believe there is one single member who can deny having profited from posting questions or other needs of help from Proz.
I have truly benefited from the help given to me by many Proz members.
Some of them are listed on this thread.
I started translating by chance. My career was moving along in another sector. I started first teaching English in public/private schools and at times I was asked to do translations for some of my students (doctors, lawyers, accountants engineers etc.), but my wife (ex now) convinced me that I should pursue it further. I was lost at the beginning, did not know where or what to do and, through searching the web, I stumbled across Proz. I did not even know where to begin looking for help on this site. As a matter of fact, I stayed out of Proz for a good while, mostly due to unfamiliarity with the world of translations and behavior and the surfing of this site. But, in the past couple of years I have faithfully stuck to Proz. I have it as my home page. The help I have acquired from Proz are more than can be listed: in terminologies, help in understanding some sentence structuring and meanings, the seriousness of those people who are part of this site, their patience in answering and explain some terms and.. etc. etc..
The biggest compliment that anyone can make to this site is undoubtly the speed and receptiveness to make changes and adjustments to many of the features offered by it.
There are countless translators’ web sites and forums, but, once you get hooked on Proz. the others just don’t give you the same


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

KudoZ networking - please tell us your story

Advanced search






WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »
memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search