Interpreting in the Global Village of the 21st Century - Online July 21.
Thread poster: Claudia Brauer

Claudia Brauer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:55
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
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Jul 15, 2011

I invite you to attend a ProZ lecture I will be giving July 21st on the Current State of the Interpreting Industry in the Global Village of the 21st Century, part of ProZ First Interpreter Virtual Workshop. You will enjoy this topic if you are a working or aspiring interpreter, translator, linguist, interculturalist, trainer or are in any way involved with cultural diversity or cross-cultural communication. Don’t miss it. I will be talking about the urgent need for us to be extremely aware of the world in which we live and the fascinating digital revolution taking place around us at the speed of light. I stress the fact that instead of resisting technology, we must embrace it and learn to use it to further our professional advancement and intercultural communication. If we do not become part of the digital revolution, we will soon be left out of the loop of progress... similar to what happened to those who refused to learn how to use a computer a few years ago... in just a decade they became obsolete because they are no longer able to interact in the modern world. Call it language interpreters, or teachers, or trainers, or cross-cultural communicators, this lecture is intended to be a wake-up call about our need to actively embrace the new technologies to promote intercultural communication. Registrater at

http://www.proz.com/virtual-conferences/260/program


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Vladimir Dubisskiy  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 20:55
Member (2001)
English to Russian
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cool Jul 16, 2011

This is an awesome pitch.
The only harsh piece (for me) would be - If we do not become part of the digital revolution, we will soon be left out of the loop of progress... similar to what happened to those who refused to learn how to use a computer a few years ago... in just a decade they became obsolete because they are no longer able to interact in the modern world.

I mean, who became "obsolete" - people? - i think this is wrong.
Well, it hardly can be because all this "revolution" is/was about involving people into some kind of interaction. No one can become "obsolete" just because she/he does not know / want / like computers. Humans were before computers and I strongly believe that they will be after computers too)
Have a nice weekend all you people!
Thank you.




Claudia Brauer wrote:

I invite you to attend a ProZ lecture I will be giving July 21st on the Current State of the Interpreting Industry in the Global Village of the 21st Century, part of ProZ First Interpreter Virtual Workshop. You will enjoy this topic if you are a working or aspiring interpreter, translator, linguist, interculturalist, trainer or are in any way involved with cultural diversity or cross-cultural communication. Don’t miss it. I will be talking about the urgent need for us to be extremely aware of the world in which we live and the fascinating digital revolution taking place around us at the speed of light. I stress the fact that instead of resisting technology, we must embrace it and learn to use it to further our professional advancement and intercultural communication. If we do not become part of the digital revolution, we will soon be left out of the loop of progress... similar to what happened to those who refused to learn how to use a computer a few years ago... in just a decade they became obsolete because they are no longer able to interact in the modern world. Call it language interpreters, or teachers, or trainers, or cross-cultural communicators, this lecture is intended to be a wake-up call about our need to actively embrace the new technologies to promote intercultural communication. Registrater at

http://www.proz.com/virtual-conferences/260/program


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Claudia Brauer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:55
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
A better word would have been "workers" Jul 17, 2011

Hello, Vladimir. I totally agree with you. Since I was writing (and will be talking) about professionals in the working world, it was meant to imply "workers", not humans. I have been a translator and an interpreter for 30 years. I started typing translations in a mechanical typewriter - more than half the time of translation would be spend typing and re-typing, not translating. Corrections and editions were a whole task in themselves because you would have to type and retype. Search for terms was by hand in dozens of dictionaries. It was, for all practical purposes, in terms of the MECHANICS of the profession, a whole other world. My point is: are there any translators out there who are not using computers? how efficient is their work? are there any interpreters who are not using the tools of technology available? This forum is but one example of them. In any profession I see the same. I worked in the in-house in the healthcare industry in the late 90s. The nurses that were being hired then for the most part had never used a computer and had a difficult time using it. Today, I know most of the medical profession uses electronic tools as part of their everyday life and computers are a standard tool for nurses. However, there were many who in the 90s refused to learn. Unless they work outside the Americas and Europe, I don't know if they would be able to find work. That is what I meant, that for most professions, those people who have decided not to participate in the electronic revolution are out of the loop of today's jobs. I see the same with the digital revolution. If we don't become part of the solution, we will be one more problem in the equation.

But, in terms of the thought processes and communication among humans, you are right in principle. Though even initiatives such as Grameen, fighting extreme poverty around the world, is using the technologies of cellphones to help lift people out of poverty. So, technology is reaching even the poorest villages in many poor countries. And those children who DO NOT participate will be at a HUGE disadvantage, competitively speaking in terms of their future in the jobs industry. You do bring up a very important point, though. Worth discussing. Thank you.


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