difference between certification and credentials
Thread poster: Madeleine Chevassus

Madeleine Chevassus  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 19:23
Member (2010)
English to French
Mar 31, 2011

hello all,

I would like to understand "certification required" in a job post; the context is a semi-contractual text in a technical domain.

I have scientific credentials, but no law certification; do you think it would be prudent to take the job?
(6,000 words)

thanks a lot

Marie

NB: Trados is not required so this has nothing to do with the Trados certification.

[Edited at 2011-03-31 08:51 GMT]


 

Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:23
Member (2004)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Depends on the country Mar 31, 2011

For example, here in the U.S., we don't have a system of sworn translators, but there are a variety of bodies that certify translators (the ATA, some court systems). If the translator has to be certified, that could be what they mean.

Also in the U.S., however, anyone can certify a translation, even if they themselves have no certification. It's a matter of signing a document you create yourself stating that you are a professional translator, knowledgeable in the two languages and the subject matter, and that the translation is complete and accurate to the best of your knowledge, belief and ability. So it could also mean that.

I suspect what they're looking for is the first option: a translator with some sort of professional certification from a translator-evaluation body, possibly in a specific country.


 

Madeleine Chevassus  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 19:23
Member (2010)
English to French
TOPIC STARTER
thank you for your help Apr 1, 2011

thank you for your help

in the latter case my professional experience should be enough

have a nice week-end

Marie


 

Madeleine Chevassus  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 19:23
Member (2010)
English to French
TOPIC STARTER
another explanation! Apr 1, 2011

I red that in another job posting:

certified translation, which means translator's signature required.

Marie


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 19:23
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
It's best to ask the customer Apr 2, 2011

I reckon in this case it is best if you ask the customer what country is the document required to be certified in (what is the target country of the text), since the regulations about what is considered a "certified translation" depend on the country.

Once the customer has expressed the use of the document and in what country it is to be deemed a "certified translator", you may want to call a translator association in your country to establish whether you meet the requirements to issue a "certified translation".

For instance, in Spain you have to be approved as a certified translator by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, either by training or after passing a very strict translation exam.


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 16:23
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Tell the customer to ask... Apr 2, 2011

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:
I reckon in this case it is best if you ask the customer...
[snip]
For instance, in Spain you have to be approved as a certified translator by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, either by training or after passing a very strict translation exam.


Often it won't help knowing the destination country.

In Spain, Brazil, and some other countries that do have laws on the matter, translations for official purposes will be valid only if done by their respective government-certified translators. The major difference between these two is that Spain allows their gov't-certified translators to exist as such outside its territory, while Brazil doesn't.

In countries that don't have such laws, like e.g. most of the English-speaking ones, each office/agency/entity is free to set their own rules, some of which may be:
  • any individual self-declaring as fully bilingual and taking liability for the translation accuracy;
  • any translator certified by one or a few accrediting organizations (e.g. ATA, NAATI, ABRATES, etc.);
  • any translator whose translations are accepted for official purposes in the country where the document was issued;
  • a translation issued or endorsed by the country of issue's local diplomatic authhorities;
  • any translation whatsoever, including and ad-lib translation by the interested party.


This may vary from an office to another, from one attending servant to another, and even according to that same servant's mood from one day to another.

So it's best to tell the client to ask wherever they'll be submitting the document with the translation, recommending they get an answer in writing, if at all possible.


 


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difference between certification and credentials

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