MA Legal Translation now closed
Thread poster: Slava Trd

Slava Trd  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:57
English to French
May 20, 2013

Hello everybody,


I just read that the MA in Legal Translation of City University London is no longer running. I was actually filling my application. This is so disappointing and unexpected.. especially since several open evenings were held in march and april.
Does anybody know why they close this Master's degree?


Thanks,
Have a nice day.


Slava

[Edited at 2013-05-20 22:30 GMT]


 

Tatty  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:57
Spanish to English
+ ...
Probably a blessing May 20, 2013

I have no idea why they have stopped offering the MA, but it is probably a blessing. I think that it would be so much more productive and cost-effective to actually study law itself as opposed to legal translating. Law can be studied on a module basis through several UK universities. But in your case you would have to study French law.

 

Slava Trd  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:57
English to French
TOPIC STARTER
re: probably a blessing May 20, 2013

Hello Tatty,

Thank you for your answer.

I already hold a French Master's degree in law but I have no training in translation so that is what I was looking for through this MA (as well as studying further comparative law).


 

Tatty  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:57
Spanish to English
+ ...
Brilliant May 21, 2013

That sounds like just the ticket. Why don't you do a less expense part-time translating course now. People seem to recommend the preparatory courses for the Institute of Linguists exam. Just a suggestion.

Good luck to you.

BTW, I don't really think that you will need to study comparative law. You'll find that all the same elements are in English law but they may have a different weighting. You can find any English law definition on line nowadays, or you could buy an English law dictionary and you can make the comparison yourself.

[Editado a las 2013-05-21 07:46 GMT]


 

Marie-Helene Dubois  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 15:57
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
+ ...
I think it's a great shame May 21, 2013

I was planning on applying too.
The closure of this MA programme adds to the closure of the MA programme in Scientific and Technical translation from Imperial to leave not ONE specialized translation MA course in the UK.

With the importance of specialization in this industry, it's a shame that the only opportunities for academic specialization in an area of translation have been eradicated.

It is also a shame bearing in mind the news that often comes out of the industry of the shortage of native-English-speaking translators because of the shortage of native English speakers with skills in other languages.

I don't think it's a blessing. I think it's a great shame for potential students of translation and for the industry as a whole.


 

David Hayes  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 15:57
Member (2009)
French to English
Pity, but... May 21, 2013

Yes, it's always a pity when courses close without any explanation being given. Mind you, when it comes to MA programmes in translation, there is still plenty of choice in the UK:http://www.lexicool.com/courses_uk.asp?IL=1

Some of these are specialised courses, but there appears to be nothing else focusing specifically on law.
Were I richer, I might consider registering for an MA in translation myself.


 

Angela Dickson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:57
French to English
+ ...
Premature May 21, 2013

Marie-Helene Dubois wrote:

I was planning on applying too.
The closure of this MA programme adds to the closure of the MA programme in Scientific and Technical translation from Imperial to leave not ONE specialized translation MA course in the UK.


I teach on the MSc at Imperial, and it is premature to say that it is going to close, though it is true that Imperial is dropping the department. Students are still being recruited to the MSc course, and the most likely outcome is that the translation department will move to another institution.


 

Marie-Helene Dubois  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 15:57
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
+ ...
mea culpa Angela May 22, 2013

sorry. I'd heard the news that Imperial was closing the department and took that to mean that the courses within that department were to close too.

There is still sadly a lack of specialized translation MAs/MSCs in the UK (or the translation into UK English) marketplace though.


 

Łukasz Gos-Furmankiewicz  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 15:57
English to Polish
+ ...
L1 rule in into-English legal translation, three cheers May 23, 2013

Marie-Helene Dubois wrote:

It is also a shame bearing in mind the news that often comes out of the industry of the shortage of native-English-speaking translators because of the shortage of native English speakers with skills in other languages.


I do wonder how Polish to English legal translation needs are covered by those who believe in translating only into one's own native language. The typical twenty-something with fresh ink on his or her BA degree is not prepared to handle the grammar or syntax involved, forget terminology and unique phrasing. Most legal writing done by non-lawyers makes me cry. Then again, most legal writing done by lawyers write makes me cry too.

I'm intrigued by what that MA curriculum may have contained when the course was still available. I completed a post-Master's in translation and interpreting back when sworn translators in Poland were required to do so when not holders of an MA degree in translation, and that was mostly practical exercise. I can't say I learnt much; on the other hand, I can't say that law school was the place I'd learnt whatever was not new to me (my law school certainly did not teach legal writing despite being #1-2 in the country, depending whether you prefer Warsaw or Jagiellonian; I first encountered legal writing as a subject in American law studies). The course may well have been very useful to a good bunch of law graduates. The difference in my case was that I had a noticeable advantage in good old language competence, especially in English, also over the linguists attending, which is not really a quality shared by all law grads, so I'm not representative.

Anyway, law school is always a good choice. Law school or gettind admitted without a law degree. If anything, it automatically increases the respect you get from people and decreases their zombie farming zeal. Plus, in some cases you get very clearly recognisable post-nominals. Poland's law degree is an MA, but LLB, LLM or JD can't really be mistaken for anything else. Besides, if you get admitted and register a law practice, then you can offer a bunch of services relating to legal translations that a normal translator can't.


 

Peter Shortall  Identity Verified
Local time: 14:57
Member
French to English
+ ...
Cost? Jun 7, 2013

I only just spotted this story while trawling the Internet and was about to start a new thread until I found this one.

Quite some time ago, I was interested in this course myself, but the relatively high cost and the mixed reviews I read put me off. From previous Internet postings about it, I gather that the price was ramped up over a relatively short period from £4k to £5k and then to £7k, so I have to wonder whether that was a sign that it was becoming too expensive for City University to run it - though if that's the case, surely they must have realized that a price tag of £7k was going to put people off when you can study various law courses a lot more cheaply. For instance, CILEX Level 3 courses come in at roughly £900-1k (the last time I checked) depending on where you study, and that's the option I think I'll go for next year, if I can find a way of fitting it in around work!

I seem to remember reading something about City University planning to offer an MA in Financial Translation as well at one point, but nothing seems to have come of it, so I imagine that idea has fallen by the wayside too.


 

Daniela Ciafardoni  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:57
Italian to English
+ ...
Cilex level 3 Diploma Feb 17, 2015

Hi,
I was looking into studying for the Cilex Level 3 Diploma too and was wondering if you ever went for it Peter and, if so, would you recommend it?
I would like to deepen my knowledge in the subject area whilst I am bringing up my young family and before I get back to translating.

I was wondering if studying individual modules such as contract law, conveyancing at level 3, then European Law and Company and Partnership Law would be more beneficial as well as more cost effective than going for the Diploma itself?

On the other hand I thought that having the Diploma qualification would enhance my credibility with prospective clients, do you think this is the case?

I appreciate any feedback you may be able to give.
Daniels


 


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