Freelance birth certificate translation
Thread poster: Daniel McCartney

Daniel McCartney  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:20
French to English
+ ...
Feb 12, 2014

My question is fairly straightforward. If a client approaches me directly with a request to translate a birth certificate, what can I provide the client to show that the translation will be accepted? Is a simple affirmation that the translation is valid enough, or would I need further certification, from an organization or through an agency?

For context, I'm American and the translation is for an application for a Green Card.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tim Friese  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:20
Member (2013)
Arabic to English
+ ...
I think you need to write a COA Feb 12, 2014

Hi Daniel,

For legal purposes in the US, I don't believe you ever need a third party to vouch for quality. As the translator, you write a Certificate of Accuracy (COA) stating the translation is accurate. You should make sure you know whether your client wants a hard or soft copy of the COA. Sign the hard copy or put an image of your signature on the soft copy.

Have the client check and see whether they need it notarized. If so, you would take the translation and your COA to a notary, sign the COA in the presence of the notary, and the notary would then notarize it. Many people think this is a statement of the quality of the translation. It is not. It is verification that you are the person you say you are, and nothing more.

Here are two of the first links I found for COAs. I don't think there's a legally required text, but you'll generally see similar statements on different COAs.

http://wings.buffalo.edu/intlservices/documents/TranslatorCertification.pdf
http://www.emory.edu/isss/mini_sites/external_services/Certificate%20of%20Accuracy.pdf

Hope this helps!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Diana Coada  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:20
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Exactly Feb 13, 2014

and it works the same way in the UK.

Tim Friese wrote:
As the translator, you write a Certificate of Accuracy (COA) stating the translation is accurate. You should make sure you know whether your client wants a hard or soft copy of the COA. Sign the hard copy or put an image of your signature on the soft copy.

Have the client check and see whether they need it notarized. If so, you would take the translation and your COA to a notary, sign the COA in the presence of the notary, and the notary would then notarize it. Many people think this is a statement of the quality of the translation. It is not. It is verification that you are the person you say you are, and nothing more.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:20
Russian to English
+ ...
All you need is Feb 13, 2014

a duly executed Certificate of Accuracy--it has to be notarized to be valid for the immigration authorities in the US.

I don't agree that the certificate of accuracy just verifies the identity. The translator vows that they are fluent in both languages and that the document has been translated to the best of their knowledge and abilities, and thus they take the liability to a large extent for anything incorrectly translated and make themselves liable to lawsuits.

[Edited at 2014-02-13 11:13 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Daniel McCartney  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:20
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
One more thing Feb 19, 2014

But first, thanks for all the input. It's been a great help. A further question: to what extent does the translated document need to preserve the formatting of the original?

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Triston Goodwin  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:20
Spanish to English
+ ...
Formatting Feb 19, 2014

I've personally seen numbered lists of text and fully recreated and translated documents. I personally try to conserve as much as possible, just to make the guy at the USCIS's job easier.

To echo the advice given above, you can even find blank copies online (I think the USCIS even gives an example one that you can copy). I haven't needed to notarize any of the translations that I've sent in, but it certainly wouldn't hurt and it can be done cheaply (my UPS Store only charges $2 to notarize anything).

I personally translated all of my wife's documents for her greencard and visa.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Davidrainey
Australia
Hi Daniel, Feb 19, 2014

Daniel McCartney wrote:

My question is fairly straightforward. If a client approaches me directly with a request to translate a birth certificate, what can I provide the client to show that the translation will be accepted? Is a simple affirmation that the translation is valid enough, or would I need further certification, from an organization or through an agency?

For context, I'm American and the translation is for an application for a Green Card.


Hi Daniel,
You don't need to convince your client about the accuracy of the translation you do, as you are a certified translator. As the translator, you write a Certificate of Accuracy (COA) stating the translation is accurate. But just ask your client whether he needs a hard or soft copy of the COA.


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Freelance birth certificate translation

Advanced search







Anycount & Translation Office 3000
Translation Office 3000

Translation Office 3000 is an advanced accounting tool for freelance translators and small agencies. TO3000 easily and seamlessly integrates with the business life of professional freelance translators.

More info »
BaccS – Business Accounting Software
Modern desktop project management for freelance translators

BaccS makes it easy for translators to manage their projects, schedule tasks, create invoices, and view highly customizable reports. User-friendly, ProZ.com integration, community-driven development – a few reasons BaccS is trusted by translators!

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search