Pages in topic:   [1 2 3] >
Off topic: What music do you listen to when you translate?
Thread poster: conejo

conejo  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:02
Member (2003)
Japanese to English
+ ...
Jun 11, 2009

This is more of a curiosity post than anything... Do you listen to music while you translate? And if so, what kind do you listen to, to get you going and help you along in the work day?

My favorite to listen to while translating is some form of trance or techno music. This is because it has a beat, and doesn't have many words, which is good, since I'm already dealing with 2 languages and I don't need to be wanting to sing, too.

Next after that would be some other type of upbeat music with a beat (hip-hop, rock, 80s, etc. etc.). I find that having a relatively fast beat helps me work faster, and as long as the music is upbeat (has a positive feel to it) I stay in a better mood.

I try to avoid music that compels me to sing, depressing-sounding music (My Immortal by Evanescence, lol) and anything that would drag me down mentally.

Sometimes I listen to the regular radio, but usually not because I have to keep changing the stations because of the commercials...

Just curious about what other people do.



[Edited at 2009-06-11 22:58 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Aziz Hashmi  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:02
German to English
music tastes Jun 12, 2009

On a tight schedule, I like to have mid-90s jazzy drum and bass in the background. Some of the "liquid breaks" played around London at the moment do it for me too, as it creates an aesthetic backdrop at such a tempo that allows me to absorb myself in the work at hand. The anolog synth sweeps and sub basslines combined with recycled beats are somehow stimulating, IMO.
The only problem is when I am loving a tune, I get distracted and want to know the title and artist. But hey, such is life.

aziz


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Paul Dixon  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 07:02
Portuguese to English
+ ...
My Musical Preferences when Translating Jun 12, 2009

When I have a really difficult or technical translation, I don't listen to anything, but when the work is easier I like:

- Elvis Presley

- ABBA

- Johnnie Rivers

- Bee Gees "One Night Only"


Direct link Reply with quote
 

conejo  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:02
Member (2003)
Japanese to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
ABBA Jun 12, 2009

Paul Dixon wrote:
When I have a really difficult or technical translation, I don't listen to anything, but when the work is easier I like:
- Elvis Presley
- ABBA
- Johnnie Rivers
- Bee Gees "One Night Only"


Haha, yeah I could see listening to ABBA. I turn it off temporarily too if I am working on a really difficult or complex passage.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

conejo  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:02
Member (2003)
Japanese to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Mushroom Jazz Jun 12, 2009

Aziz Hashmi wrote:
On a tight schedule, I like to have mid-90s jazzy drum and bass in the background. Some of the "liquid breaks" played around London at the moment do it for me too, as it creates an aesthetic backdrop at such a tempo that allows me to absorb myself in the work at hand.


Yes, the Mark Farina stuff is good too, like the various volumes of Mushroom Jazz. You might like that if you don't have it already.

[Edited at 2009-06-12 00:43 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Bea Geenen  Identity Verified
Hong Kong
Member (2008)
English to Dutch
+ ...
www.accuradio.com Jun 12, 2009

I always listen to www.accuradio.com, an online radiostation with a wide choice of music styles: urban, pop, rock, indie, classical, jazz - and their subgenres. They have no commercial breaks, and you can unselect artists that you don't want included in the play list.

While translating, I usually listen to their Mozart channel, when doing my bookkeeping, I'll choose something cheery like the "A Flock of Eighties" channel and when translating from Chinese, I put on the Chinese pop channel - helps me keep the mind focused and the heart in the right mood.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

conejo  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:02
Member (2003)
Japanese to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Digitally Imported Jun 12, 2009

Bea Geenen wrote:
I always listen to www.accuradio.com, an online radiostation with a wide choice of music styles: urban, pop, rock, indie, classical, jazz - and their subgenres. They have no commercial breaks, and you can unselect artists that you don't want included in the play list.


Thanks for the info about AccuRadio... Digitally Imported (http://www.di.fm/) is another site like AccuRadio that focuses on trance/techno/dance music. Go to Listen Now, choose a station, Windows Media, and 40k low bandwidth to listen for free.

Wow Chinese to Dutch... sounds like quite a language pair.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 06:02
English to French
+ ...
Music that has no lyrics Jun 12, 2009

I listen to music that has no lyrics. I would otherwise start singing along and that doesn't help in concentrating on my translation. Anything goes - classical, lounge, electronica, ambient techno... I have very eclectic tastes, and I would also listen to opera, country and metal - if only those had no lyrics...

The only music I listen to when working that does have lyrics is music I know the lyrics to so well that I am not aware that I am singing along. Then, I can concentrate on my work.

Something I have been listening to lately that does have lyrics is Sigur Ròs - calm, soothing for the most part. The lyrics are in Icelandic and since I have absolutely no knowledge of Icelandic, there is no risk of singing along.

[Edited at 2009-06-12 01:08 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Karahan Sisman  Identity Verified
Turkey
Local time: 13:02
Member (2010)
English to Turkish
+ ...
might sound weird, but.. Jun 12, 2009

When I start working, I listen to heavy metal with tough riffs and cool drums, as it gets me ready for lots of words to translate...

When I feel tired in the act, I listen to electronic music with continuous beats and clean vocals, as it gives me a rhythm for typing on keyboard..

When I am about to finish the work, I listen to classical music with smooth violins and mellow pianos, as it takes away all the stress and lets me sleep like a log...



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Rod Walters  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 19:02
Japanese to English
Bit of shamisen, like Jun 12, 2009

conejo, do you know Agatsuma and Yoshida Kyodai? They play some pretty intense shamisen in jazz and blues arrangements. Agatsuma also has a Classics album which is just traditional shamisen if you like that (I do).

Otherwise, I like trance, drum 'n bass, and world music.

Kruder and Dorfmeister / Tosca
Beanfield
De-Phazz
Four Tet
The Dining Rooms
Lemon Jelly
LTJ Bukem
Mars Lasar (the Karma album is great. Anything else, crap)
Anything by Claude Challe and Ravin
Talvin Singh

Much as I like ABBA, those crystal clear vocals are a bit too distracting for work.

Incidentally, I really don't like spoken samples in music. It's true that there are some masters in the field (De-Phazz for one), but hearing the same drivel repeated-ed-ed repeat repeat repeat ed-ed-ed really gets on my nerves. Cut it out, OK? However, as a technical translator, there is one voice sample I really cherish from Kruder and Dorfmeister:

"Am I airtight?"
"You're airtight, Sir"
"And watertight?"
"And watertight! (goofy 1950s American engineer-type chuckle)"


Direct link Reply with quote
 

conejo  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:02
Member (2003)
Japanese to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Shamisen Jun 12, 2009

Rod Walters wrote:
conejo, do you know Agatsuma and Yoshida Kyodai? They play some pretty intense shamisen in jazz and blues arrangements.

Hmm shamisen + jazz & blues is not something I would have thought of before. Might have to check it out sometime. I do like traditional Japanese music in certain moods, but some of it is too soulful and sad-sounding for me to work to...


Direct link Reply with quote
 

delveneto
United States
Local time: 06:02
English to Portuguese
+ ...
No rule Jun 12, 2009

There is no rule for me. My musical taste is ample. I can tell that yesterday I listened to "Pirates of the Caribbean - At World's End" twice while answering kudoz. Today, none. Tomorrow? I will know tomorrow.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 12:02
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Depends Jun 12, 2009

Normal deadlines = Varied music from the radio
Medium urgency = Beethoven, Dvorak, etc.
Deadly rush = Funky from the 80's


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Alessandra Martelli  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 12:02
Member (2009)
English to Italian
+ ...
It heavily depends on daytime Jun 12, 2009

- Morning music: as I usually wake up early (6 to 7 am) early morning music is something that really has to take me out of bed, so the very first 4 or 5 songs are hard rock/heavy metal (Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Grave Digger, Motörhead, ...). Today, e.g., the first one was:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mV3RTQzW2Lw
(by the way, this is a masterpiece to me. I was there in 2002, melted with the rest of that noisy crowd and I totally loved it!)

Then I set a long playlist (4-5 hours) picking up a selection of British and Italian progressive rock (ELP, King Crimson, PFM, Yes, Camel, Soft Machine, Area, New Trolls, Le Orme,...) and mixing it up with some kraut rock (Can, Ash Ra Tempel, Tangerine Dream) and some punk, reggae & rocksteady tunes (something like Madness, The Clash, Peter Tosh, ...), then I add some Pink Floyd tunes (I just cannot listen to a playlist if there is no Pink Floyd!), a couple of opera arias, some Italian singer-songwriter songs, stir well and off we go until lunchtime!

- Afternoon music: I usually listen to live365 (http://www.live365.com) and pick up a station (some of my favourites are "60s chart toppers", "dimensions in jazz" and "on the rocks"). There are some very short commercials for free members but they're really short and don't bother me.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Adam Łobatiuk  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 12:02
Member (2009)
English to Polish
+ ...
A bit like Alessandra Jun 12, 2009

But I prefer metal in the evening, when I'm tired, and Metallica works best for me (it's also fantastic for exercising, e.g. running). It really boosts motivation and keeps you from falling asleep.

When I need to focus, but still listen to something, I choose ambient/drone music by Bass Communion (http://www.myspace.com/basscommunion) which can be very weird (sometimes it's just pure noise), but also surprisingly beautiful.

When my work doesn't require that much focus, for example is more technical than linguistic, I'll listen to anything that I like, and that is mostly a few progressive rock bands from the last 3 decades, including Porcupine Tree, Marillion and OSI.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2 3] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

What music do you listen to when you translate?

Advanced search






PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »
Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search