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Off topic: Website for English slang
Thread poster: RHELLER

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 05:29
French to English
+ ...
Sep 1, 2003

http://www.slangsite.com/

I found it this morning while searching for Kudoz question references.

Pretty wild stuff!


 

Ruben Berrozpe  Identity Verified
English to Spanish
Since you started it... Sep 1, 2003

http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/

Only for the UK

Rb


 

lien
Netherlands
Local time: 13:29
English to French
+ ...
Another one Sep 1, 2003

Rita Heller wrote:

http://www.slangsite.com/

I found it this morning while searching for Kudoz question references.

Pretty wild stuff!




Wilder.But may be useful.


 

Lingua DK  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 13:29
Member (2005)
English to Danish
+ ...
Another slang dictionary Sep 1, 2003

.... and one more:
http://www.peakenglish.com/slang/slangSearch.jsp


 

Alina Matei  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 20:59
English to Romanian
+ ...
and many, many more on the same topic :) Sep 1, 2003

The guy who put up the link below seems to have fallen in love with slang. Check out his collectionicon_smile.gifhttp://bovis.gyuvet.ch/2res/d07slang.htm

 

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 05:29
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
No sense of humor! Sep 1, 2003

I posted some fun stuff from the website today in addition to my regular answer - just for fun - but a couple people gave me "neutral" grades because they didn't think it was applicable.

Too seriousicon_frown.gif


 

Kemal Mustajbegovic  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:29
English to Croatian
+ ...
Australian slang Sep 2, 2003

Here's one with the slang from Down Under

http://www.koalanet.com/australian-slang.html

Cheers!


 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:29
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Barrack, Down Under and Up Over Sep 2, 2003

Thanks for the link to the Aussie slang dictionary.

I see that in Australia,"barrack" means to cheer on (a football team, etc.)
In UK English, it means exactly the opposite - to insult, jeer at (a politician, boxer, football team etc. - except that in football it is often an individual player rather than the team which is barracked).


 

Dylan Edwards  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:29
Greek to English
+ ...
Vodkatea Sep 2, 2003

For anyone wanting a very concentrated up-to-the-minute dose of American slang, this site might be worth looking at:
http://www.vodkatea.com

The online community on this site is described as "people sharing their private vernaculars".

...Well maybe it will develop and become more interesting. At the moment it looks like too much teenage stuff.

[Edited at 2003-09-02 18:23]


 

Ruben Berrozpe  Identity Verified
English to Spanish
Great collection! Sep 2, 2003

I am bookmarking all of them. It was a great idea to post this forum!!

And yes, we do need some sense of humour even in kudoz. The other day I answered a question with a funny story concerning the work asked. I gave no answer really, it was only meant to be funny, and I even received a few "agrees"!! =^D

Ruben


 

xxxErika P  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:29
English to Hungarian
+ ...
2 of my favourites Sep 6, 2003

To Rita, and all –

1. Chicklit: the library is a top place to hang (it all) out: slang, jargon, idioms, clichés...and more.
http://www.chicklit.com/library/libraryslangetc.html

2. BuzzWhack: (US) Focuses on "de-mystifying the buzzword of the moment" – tons of slang expressions and jargon, like this one:
"buzz.whack.er (buz´wak er) n. A person who receives some degree of pleasure in bursting the bubbles of the pompous."
icon_wink.gifhttp://www.buzzwhack.com/


 

Daniel Meier  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:29
English to German
+ ...
One more for the collection Sep 7, 2003

This is actually a whole site dedicated to British English for Americans. Of course it has also a slang dictionary, just look for the link in the left menu:
www.effingpot.com/index.html

I found it looking for an explanation for "Porky Pies", which lead me also to a nice little online game:
www.amherstlodge.com/games/porky_pies/index.htm
Unfortunately they give no explanations, why a certain answer is right.


 

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 05:29
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
cockney and UK slang - X rated! Oct 3, 2003

Don't say I didn't warn youicon_smile.gif

The credit goes to Ian Winick and Babayaga

http://www.londonslang.com

www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk.


 

ntext  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 06:29
Member
German to English
+ ...
Excuse my Maltese ... Oct 3, 2003

While we're at it:

English (US, GB, AUS) slang:
http://www.urbandictionary.com/

German slang:
http://www.du.nw.schule.de/geds/fachbereiche/deutsch/dejsp.htm

Slang dictionaries for many languages:
http://www.notam02.no/~hcholm/altlang/stat.html


 

María Teresa Taylor Oliver  Identity Verified
Panama
Local time: 06:29
English to Spanish
+ ...
Two more... Oct 8, 2003

http://www.pseudodictionary.com/

http://www.slanguage.com/

Enjoy! icon_smile.gif

~*T.*~


 
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