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Off topic: Misspelt Names
Thread poster: Paul Dixon

Paul Dixon  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 10:22
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Dec 18, 2009

I wonder if any other ProZians can beat my record of how many different misspellings of a personal name have been used in correspondence, on credit cards etc.

My record:

First Name (Paul): PAL, POL, POUL, POOL, POU and PAU.

POOL seems to be the most common.

Surname (Dixon): DIXAN, DIXIN, DUXSAN, TIXAN and TEXAN.

All about the same in frequency.


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NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 09:22
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

Moderator of this forum
Wow! Dec 18, 2009

I don't think I can beat your surname switches, but my husband was christened Johnothan, so you can imagine the variety of aliases he has among his different cards... One supplier even insists on issuing invoices to Johnson's Upholstery!

His dad was christened Leonard Walter, but one ID card states Leonard Walker.

I've never had any problems myself.


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Sindy Cremer

Member (2008)
English to Dutch
+ ...
Amazing.. Dec 18, 2009

what they come up with..

(Sindy) Cindy Cindi Sindi Syndy Cyndi Sindie Cindie Sinndi
(Cremer) Kremer Kramer Kremmer Kreamer Cramer Creamer Craymor Cremin



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Mats Wiman  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 15:22
Member (2000)
German to Swedish
+ ...

MODERATOR
Impressive! Dec 18, 2009

Mine are meagre:

Mat, Matts, Math Veeman, (that is how I prounounce it) Wyman, Weeman.

Mats (short for Mathias/Mathew/Gift o God (in Hebrew))


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Maria Korolenkova
Russian Federation
Local time: 16:22
English to Russian
+ ...
Patronymic Dec 18, 2009

My boss recieves letters from some American NGO, beginning with "Dear Mr. Vladislavovich". That is neither his surname nor name, but patronymic (meaning his fathers name is Vladislav). I wonder what is the reason for this confusion, because his surname (Roginsky) definitely looks like surname

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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 16:22
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
None at all Dec 18, 2009

Surprisingly I must admit that my rather difficult name never gets misspelled, except by myself in a hurry.
I remember one incident when still working in a research team. I had written to an American scientist and suggested a method related to a problem in image analysis. I signed my letter as usual with "Heinrich Pesch".

The person wrote me a kind answer but put on the envelope:

"Dr. Heinrich Pesch".

Of course my colleagues thought that I had been imposing the title myself. Very embarrassing indeed!


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Evangelia Mouma  Identity Verified
Greece
Local time: 14:22
English to Greek
+ ...
Not so much with spelling as with pronunciation Dec 18, 2009

My friends call me Lilia but my "formal" name is Evangelia. I made the mistake of not putting an "h" after "g" (Evanghelia), so almost everyone says evandjelia. Also, the stress is on LI (EvangeLIa) but this is difficult for English speakers it seems and everyone pronounces it as evanDJElia or, in the best cases, evanGHElia. Now, the second one translates as gospel (as in the Gospel of Matthew etc, because in Greek it means "good news", so basically the Apostles brought good news or wrote about good news etc). So you can imagine the nightmare every time I had to introduce myself. Because in spite of whatever I said my name was, the name was almost always mispronounced.

[Edited at 2009-12-18 07:29 GMT]


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Michiel Leeuwenburgh  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 15:22
Member (2009)
English to Dutch
Need I mention more... Dec 18, 2009

than my name?
Not even the slow, meticulous spelling of my name (especially my surname) over the phone is a guarantee for correct spelling...

Cheers,
Michiel Leeuwenburgh


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Jan Willem van Dormolen  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 15:22
English to Dutch
+ ...
Mine's quite creative too... Dec 18, 2009

Jan Willem van Dormolen, that's what my name is.
First name Jan Willem is two words. Dutch people are aware of Dutch males often having double names, but they tend to connect them with a hyphen (Jan-Willem). Still, it's a long name, so I get abbreviated a lot. Some people even call me JW. Foreign people usually don't get the double name bit, so I get called Jan a lot.

But then the last name. I won't even go into what foreigners make of it, although, since it looks weird to them anyway, they do surprisingly well.
But the natives:
van der Molen, van Doormolen, van Doormalen, van Oormolen, van Dormden, etc, and then each of these without the van bit.
I'm usually very surprised when someone gets in right in one go...

According to a new site that meticulously archives all Dutch surnames, there are actually only 104 people in the Netherlands with my surname. Maybe that's got something to do with it?

[Bijgewerkt op 2009-12-18 08:07 GMT]


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:22
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Also more pronunciation than spelling Dec 18, 2009

Though I have seen my surname (Doughty) written as Doherty and Docherty. But it has been pronounced as both these, also Duffty and Dorty.
The one I always remember was way back in 1957. I was in the Lost Property Office at Paddington station asking about something I had left on a train. I told the man the other side of the desk my name was Doughty, and he replied: "Oh, you mean DIRTY!"


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 14:22
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Jack, how SHOULD your name be pronounced? Dec 18, 2009

Jack Doughty wrote:

Though I have seen my surname (Doughty) written as Doherty and Docherty. But it has been pronounced as both these, also Duffty and Dorty.
The one I always remember was way back in 1957. I was in the Lost Property Office at Paddington station asking about something I had left on a train. I told the man the other side of the desk my name was Doughty, and he replied: "Oh, you mean DIRTY!"


So, Jack, how should your name be pronounced? Is it DOWTY, as in NOW? Or DORTY as in OUGHT? Or DOFFTY as in OFF? Just curious!
As for myself, yes, my surname is now FORBES which is not an uncommon name, but I still have to spell it out for people because otherwise they insist on calling me FORD. And my maiden name was more unusual - ORDISH. Spelt exactly as pronounced, but people usually insisted on something like AUDISH - why?? And my father sometimes got called ODDISH, OLDISH and even BALDISH, which was particularly wounding as he went bald rather young.
Then there's my first name, CARON, which I never use and which, I'm told, my father dreamed up at the font. This causes the greatest difficulty because one is expected "dans les pays anglo-saxones" to use one's first name. Problematical here because everyone insists on KAREN and I have to give the font explanation every time. Wearying ...
Parents should take great care when naming their children, don't you think? Even consider the initials - they might spell something comic or demeaning.
Best wishes,
Jenny - a nice, simple name, hooray!


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:22
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Dowty as in "now" Dec 18, 2009

Definitions of "doughty" on the Web:

* brave, courageous and stouthearted
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/doughty

* adjective - 1. able; strong; valiant; redoubtable 2. marked by stouthearted courage; brave
www.gdiproductions.net/srdamd/

which could be translated into Russian as "смелый", pronounced "Smelly". That goes quite well with "Dirty", doesn't it?

[Edited at 2009-12-18 16:41 GMT]


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Andrea Re  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:22
English to Italian
+ ...
I often wondered myself... Dec 18, 2009

Jack Doughty wrote:

Definitions of "doughty" on the Web:

* Doughty is a surname, and may refer to: * Al Doughty (born 1966), musician and bassist * Andrew Doughty (born 1916), leading anesthetist * Anthony Doughty (20th century), British musician * Arthur Doughty (1860-1936), Canadian civil servant * Cecil Langley Doughty (1913-1985), British comics ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doughty


* brave, courageous and stouthearted
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/doughty


* adjective - 1. able; strong; valiant; redoubtable 2. marked by stouthearted courage; brave
www.gdiproductions.net/srdamd/


which could be translated into Russian as "смелый", pronounced "Smelly". That goes quite well with "Dirty", doesn't it?


I was pronouncing like dough-ty:)

My name AND surname are always endless for of amusement.
In the UK Andrea is a female name, while in Italy is male, but despite the spelling stays the same (the pronunciation in the UK varies as the stress can go either on the first or second syllable, in my case the second) I always have to spell it out a couple of times as Brits find it difficult to accept that I am called with (what they see as) a female name
However, my my simple surname is the best bit. It hardly ever gets spelled right: ree, rae, rea, rex (that was a courier company, they couldn't come with a 2 letter surname, so they gave me a bonus "x"), rey, ray and so on and so forth; when I spell it and than pause at the end, the other person pauses as well waiting for the remaining letters to be spelled... it works every time:)


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Angela Dickson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:22
French to English
+ ...
Ha! Dec 18, 2009

Paul Dixon wrote:

Surname (Dixon): DIXAN, DIXIN, DUXSAN, TIXAN and TEXAN.


I've never had any of these, though I see my name written like yours all the time (as it's also the name of a well-known chain of electronics stores here). I get Dickinson a lot, especially from telephone cold-callers - I just say "no-one of that name here" and hang up.

When I got married there was a sign in front of the place where the reception was held, so people would know they were in the right place. It was meant to say "Wedding Reception for [my name] and [his name]".

I don't know who wrote the sign, but they managed to spell everything incorrectly apart from "Wedding", "For" and my husband's first name.


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Gabrielle Marcellus-Temple  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:22
Spanish to English
+ ...
Various mistakes... Dec 18, 2009

My name (Gabrielle) is the feminine version of Gabriel, but people sometimes think I'm a man... which led to problems when working as a healthcare assistant for an agency, who didn't realise the home they sent me to needed a man and thought I was one!
Marcellus-Temple always gets pronounced with a soft c, instead of a hard c, but I've really given up on correcting that...
My personal favourite, though, is a letter my husband (Dominic Marcellus-Temple) once received from the council - it was addressed to 'Demonic Temple'!


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