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Thread poster: Gillian Searl

Gillian Searl  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:59
Member (2004)
German to English
Jan 14, 2010

I just noticed this article on the BBC http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/manchester/8458184.stm

It made me smile - I hadn't thought of teaching my dog German commands - apart from anything else I don't know what they are. So maybe we should start a database of dog commands to help out the RSPCA and other dog rescue centres!

Sit
Down
Stay
Fetch
Off
Leave
Come


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Post removed: This post was hidden by a moderator or staff member for the following reason: Posted twice - I'm hiding this one to clean up the page.

Pernille Chapman  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:59
Member (2004)
English to Danish
+ ...
Danish (with a few other languages flung in...!) Jan 14, 2010

Thanks for posting this article, Gillian - just the thing to raise a smile on a dull Thursday morning...

These are the commands in Danish I can remember off the top of my head:

Sit = sit (even though the literal translation in Danish would be "sid")
Down = dæk
Hinter = heel/walk alongside owner (from German); often "gå pænt" ("walk nicely") if the dog is not used for hunting
Fetch = apport (from French - and evidently also used in Poland)

I've often wondered why dog commands in various languages contain such a mixture of influences. Obviously training dogs for hunting has a lot to do with it, but can anyone enlighten us on this, please?


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Jan Willem van Dormolen  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 15:59
English to Dutch
+ ...
Dutch Jan 14, 2010

Sit - Zit
Down - Af
Stay - Blijf
Fetch - Apport
Off - Af?
Leave - don't know that one
Come - Hier


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GingerR  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:59
Member (2004)
English to Polish
+ ...
You know Polish commands already :-) Jan 14, 2010

Thank you for the link. I will tell my brother to teach his dog some English!

But the article remined me about my former boss, an American expat living in Poland. She used to have three dogs, one was named "Słuchaj" which is Polish for "Listen" (not a dog command, though). I am curious now which language they spoke to their dogs, as the family is multilingual (English and Dutsch spoken at home plus Polish spoken at work).

Have a nice day!


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Silvia Pellacani  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 15:59
Member (2011)
German to Italian
+ ...
Italian Jan 14, 2010

Sit=Seduto
Down=Terra
Stay=Resta
Come=Vieni


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British Diana
Germany
Local time: 15:59
German to English
+ ...
German dogs Jan 14, 2010

Gillian, why don't you post on the German forum as well and start collecting. I can think of Sitz, Platz
P.S. I think there is a command "heel", isn't there?


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Gillian Searl  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:59
Member (2004)
German to English
TOPIC STARTER
Platz = down? Jan 14, 2010

Is Platz the same as down?

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Lucinda  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:59
Member (2002)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Dog commands Jan 14, 2010

I second Jan Willem on the Dutch commands. My dad used "mag niet" for leave in the sense of 'you are not allowed to do this or that' Is that the same as 'leave' I use English commands to my dogs and all 4 of them are 'good girls.'

Wonderful topic for a rainiy Thursday morning - at least here is Suriname it is drizzling.

Lucinda


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Gillian Searl  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:59
Member (2004)
German to English
TOPIC STARTER
Leave Jan 14, 2010

Depends on the owner but is either
"put down what is in your mouth"
or
"don't go near that (dog)


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Stephanie Wloch  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 15:59
Member (2003)
Dutch to German
Even down in Germany Jan 14, 2010

As a child I heard that a friend of mine said:"Down" to her Munsterland dog (hunting-pointing-breed), which was of German origin. I think Kevin can tell more about it.
And I'm quite sure that I heard some German commands in Italy. Even without dogs, when they made fun of the German language.


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KSL Berlin  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 14:59
Member (2003)
German to English
+ ...
Dog commands Jan 14, 2010

Gillian Searl wrote:
... maybe we should start a database of dog commands ...


For German at least, there are numerous lists of commands available, but none I have seen are really complete or reflect the context in which they may be used. For example for working with HPRs and other hunting dogs, the commands are often quite different from what one would use for family or protection dogs. So while you're compiling your lists, it might be good to include the area of application and specific differences in how a command might be understood in different areas. Retrieving is a notorious example.


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Steven Sidore  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 15:59
Member (2003)
German to English
German commands Jan 14, 2010

British Diana wrote:

Gillian, why don't you post on the German forum as well and start collecting. I can think of Sitz, Platz
P.S. I think there is a command "heel", isn't there?


let's see what I can remember...

"bei Fuß" would be heel.
"so ist brav" is good dog
"Pfui"is "bad dog"


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ICL  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 15:59
English to Spanish
+ ...
English: lingua franca for dog commands? Jan 14, 2010

Funny article, Gillian. I got an anecdote to tell (and I swear it is a true story), which confirms the article's contents.

In Panama (where I was born), one of my brothers-in-law, a dog lover, had a boxer. They brought him home as a puppy and he wanted to take him to a dog training school, which, at the time, was in one of the US military bases in the Panama Canal area.

To his surprise, the dog did not pass the training because he could not understand English. They had spoken Spanish to him all the time, so it turns out that the training (in English) made no sense to him. He had to "repeat" the course a couple times till he finally learned all the basic commands in English, but they still kept talking to him in Spanish.

Unfortunately, Bruno, the dog, died after 2 years, apparently due to some genetic problem (something like liver cancer). It was sad to see him go so early , but I always remember the story about his English language problems.

Ivette


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danilingua  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 15:59
English to German
+ ...
ja Jan 14, 2010

Gillian Searl wrote:

Is Platz the same as down?




lange Jäger-Onkel gehabt - alle Hunde wurden in E abgerichtet. Wizig, im Ausland sind die Befehle Deutsch (Italien)
D


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