Off topic: Freshly ground proofreader
Thread poster: Michael Mestre

Michael Mestre
France
Local time: 16:22
English to French
+ ...
Apr 17, 2010

Dear colleagues,

I read today a story that is potentially very funny to everyone but us:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8627335.stm

In short, Penguin Australia had to reprint 7000 cookbooks because of a typo (lapse ?) on a single ingredient.
In such circumstances, I used to think that they would have impaled the poor proofreader on a big stick and barbecued him/her over a low flame with a generous amount of seasoning. Surprisingly, according to the article the head of publishing seems to be in a forgiving food.

Dear agency managers, what would you do in such a case ?

(I will send a free, original recipe to the first reader who spots the typo in this post).


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peiling  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 16:22
Chinese to English
+ ...
I want Apr 17, 2010

"food".icon_smile.gif
Michael Mestre wrote:

Dear colleagues,

I read today a story that is potentially very funny to everyone but us:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8627335.stm

In short, Penguin Australia had to reprint 7000 cookbooks because of a typo (lapse ?) on a single ingredient.
In such circumstances, I used to think that they would have impaled the poor proofreader on a big stick and barbecued him/her over a low flame with a generous amount of seasoning. Surprisingly, according to the article the head of publishing seems to be in a forgiving food.

Dear agency managers, what would you do in such a case ?

(I will send a free, original recipe to the first reader who spots the typo in this post).


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Michael Mestre
France
Local time: 16:22
English to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Recipe Apr 17, 2010

You won Peiling !

Here it is: Round zucchini stuffed with duck meat.


Ingredients:
-Round Zucchini (one per person)
-Duck fat and meat (as much as you want)

Some spices (to taste):
-Chill pepper
-Whole black pepper (or freshly... ground !)
-Turmeric powder
-Oregano
-Lemon and orange zest
-Salt

Recipe:

-Cut the upper part of the zucchini in an upside-down conical shape. Take the "hat" away, and cut flat its lower part in order to minimize its volume (its outer shape must still correspond to the zucchini, though).
-Empty the zucchini with a teaspoon, and keep the removed flesh in a bowl. Leave at least a 3mm-thick wall for the zucchini. Take great care not to perforate it, nothing must leak out of it.
-Roughly cut the zucchini flesh and fry it in a pan in duck grease for at least 10 minutes, until soft and sweet.
-Add the spices to the pan and mix well.
-Add the duck meat to the pan and fry for one more minute.
-Stuff the emptied zucchini with the fried mixture and put the hats back on.
-Put in the oven at 140°C for at least one hour.

The following link does not show my recipe, but it should look quite similar:
http://www.citronetvanille.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/courgetterondeweb.jpg

Enjoy ! It tastes great, I did it last week.

[Edited at 2010-04-18 08:50 GMT]


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Simon Lewis  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:22
Member (2010)
Italian to English
lo zucchino e la gente macinata Apr 17, 2010

Great story. How can the Aussies be so relaxed and yet so superior at sports?

Your recipe sounds good, Michael, although instead of using a bastardised Italian word you could have used the good old English word 'courgette'icon_wink.gif

On the subject of duck I must reccomend pappardelle al ragù di anatra:

Take a magret de canard, mince it
Fry up some finely-diced onion, carrot and celery until translucent. Add the duck and some lardons (or a bit of Italian sausage/saucisse de Toulouse). A dash of cinnamon and nutmeg could be good here.
Deglaze with some white whine, add some stock and put the lid onto your le Creuset. (If you're not using a le Creuset please leave the kitchen now)
After about an hour at a light simmer serve with your pappardelle all'uovo.

Serve with grated grana and a healthy grind of the all-important black PEPPER.

Proof-reading mistakes on the back of a postcard to ...


[Edited at 2010-04-18 00:39 GMT]


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 16:22
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Great story, Michael! Apr 18, 2010

This is a really wonderful thread for a Sunday when I decided to defrost my freezer...

Could I concoct something with the duck breast left over from Christmans and the diced squash (as we call them in Danishicon_wink.gif ) and keep the proper recipe for the summer when we have them fresh in teh garden again??

But I am moving the story from ´Proofreading and Editing´ to the ´Lighter Side´ Forum.

[Edited at 2010-04-18 10:07 GMT]


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Michael Mestre
France
Local time: 16:22
English to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Bastardized words in English Apr 18, 2010

@Louie: You are absolutely right about Zucchini - but I have to point out that Courgette is also a bastardized... French word !
Thanks for the recipe, I will definitely try it.

@Christine: Why not try this:
-Fry the duck breast on a very high flame (in its own fat) with some herbs and honey.
-Slow-cook the squash separately in olive oil, just adding salt and freshly ground black pepper (as always).
Serve them side-by-side on a plate, with a few drops of balsamic vinegar on the duck. You can also add to the duck a few salt crystals and hot chili flakes to add some violence to an otherwise sweet dish.


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 16:22
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Thanks, definitely worth a try. Apr 18, 2010

Thanks, Michael, that sounds delicious!

Tonight we are having Jerusalem artichokes from the garden - (Helianthus tuberosus) before they start sprouting and shooting and are impossible to deal with. That is a vegetable for translators and proofreaders...

http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/a/artic065.html

Its name, Jerusalem Artichoke, does not, as it seems, imply that it grows in Palestine, but is a corruption of the Italian Girasola articiocco, the Sunflower Artichoke, Girasola meaning 'turning to the sun,' an allusion to the habit it is supposed to have in common with many of the Sunflower tribe. The North Italian word articiocco - modern carciofo - comes through the Spanish, from the Arabic Al-Kharshuf. False etymology has corrupted the word in many languages: it has been derived (though wrongly) in English from 'choke' and 'heart,' or the Latin hortus, a garden, and in French, the form artichaut has been connected with chaud, hot, and chou, a cabbage.

* * * * *
In Danish it is called a jordskok (earth-choke), compared with the Globe artichoke, simply known as en artiskok.

An acquired taste for some people, but I am very fond of them.
They can be difficult to clean, but they are well worth the effort!


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David Russi  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 08:22
English to Spanish
+ ...
US/UK difference Apr 18, 2010

Definitely a case of US/UK difference: in the US, most people probably have never heard of a courgette; same with aubergine, which in the US is known almost exclusively as eggplant.

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Simon Lewis  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:22
Member (2010)
Italian to English
5 a day Apr 18, 2010

David Russi wrote:

Definitely a case of US/UK difference: in the US, most people probably have never heard of a courgette; same with aubergine, which in the US is known almost exclusively as eggplant.


I know David. Actually, looking at the dictionary zucchini is not, as I had thought, incorrect; however zucchine would be much more common. I'm pretty sure there is no such thing as linguini though (should be linguine)

Many English speakers might also be surprised if they were to order a 'pepperoni' pizza in Italy, as it would be entirely meat free!

And returning (rather obliquely) to the original topic, Italians almost never put ground black erm... pepper on anything (unless you're in Tuscany - a good grind of the stuff really adds something to a ragù di cinghiale).


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