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Off topic: Two paninis...............NOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Thread poster: Susanna Garcia

Susanna Garcia  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:58
Italian to English
+ ...
May 3, 2010

What's all this about......I can't stand it anymore. Already having to be physically restrained at the sight pf a grocer's s, I am now tormented by the Italian equivalent:
- panini are already plural; so give the s to that grocer please
- latte, it's latte, short 'a', not that affected drawn out thing; and it's MILK!!! NOT COFFEE!!!
- bruschetta; why can't you say it properly, hard sound, not brushetta............Why
- bimbo for an airhead female; actually, I have a feeling that might be Spanish, but why not bimba?

and on it goes. Any examples in other languages that make you want to scream, or am I just as ever urinating against the wind?
Suzi


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Linda Kelly  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 05:58
Spanish to English
+ ...
Bimbo.... May 3, 2010

... is actually a brand of bread in Spain. The sight of the Bimbo factory is a source of much sniggering for British tourists here!

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Karen W  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 06:58
Italian to English
OUCH! May 3, 2010

And how about ta-G-liatelli with a nice big 'G' in the middle of there? Although the problem exists both ways round. As for plurals of English words in Italian, should they use an 's' or not?? VIPs for example, who are already terrible enough to contemplate in themselves, all muttered in one breath...
Let's hope this isn't going to give me bad dreams...Notte


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Lingua 5B  Identity Verified
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Local time: 06:58
English to Croatian
+ ...
Naturalization May 3, 2010

Foreign words get naturalized in a new environment; hence the acquired/adopted changes in semantics ( often false friends), transcription, grammar patterns, pronunciation etc. It's quite natural and it's happening to all languages of the world when they "travel" outside of their original zone.

Latte is not coffee! Latte is coffee WITH milk

Panini may be plural, but an English brain must associate the -s with plural, for the most part.

Btw, we also have the expression "urinating against the wind" .. I laughed at that one!

LMAO, I also laughed hard at the Linda's explanation of Bimbo.





[Edited at 2010-05-03 23:24 GMT]


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Maurizio Spagnuolo  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 06:58
English to Italian
... May 3, 2010

Karen W wrote:

And how about ta-G-liatelli with a nice big 'G' in the middle of there? Although the problem exists both ways round. As for plurals of English words in Italian, should they use an 's' or not??



As a rule of thumb, in Italian you shouldn't use plurals for English words:

http://www.accademiadellacrusca.it/faq/faq_risp.php?id=3781&ctg_id=44

And it's tagliatelle not tagliatelli


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Lingua 5B  Identity Verified
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Local time: 06:58
English to Croatian
+ ...
@ Maurizio, seems to be true! May 3, 2010

Here is what Google Translate says for Italian:

un hamburger

due hamburger

tre hamburger

No plural suffixes! And hamburger is an English word, of course.

I found the same for the English word "bar"

That's interesting, because we do pluralize English words with our native plural suffixes.


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David Russi  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:58
English to Spanish
+ ...
Make sure to get one with proscuitto... ;-) May 3, 2010

Susanna Garcia wrote:

What's all this about......I can't stand it anymore. Already having to be physically restrained at the sight pf a grocer's s, I am now tormented by the Italian equivalent:
- panini are already plural; so give the s to that grocer please
- latte, it's latte, short 'a', not that affected drawn out thing; and it's MILK!!! NOT COFFEE!!!
- bruschetta; why can't you say it properly, hard sound, not brushetta............Why
- bimbo for an airhead female; actually, I have a feeling that might be Spanish, but why not bimba?

and on it goes. Any examples in other languages that make you want to scream, or am I just as ever urinating against the wind?
Suzi


In Spanish it is acceptable to pluzalize espaguetis, something quite similar to what happens to panini in English.


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Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:58
English to Arabic
+ ...
Spare a thought for the English language... May 3, 2010

...that's being disrespectfully misused all over the world, since it acquired lingua franca status!

My favourite word in Egypt is "typical". It started out with it being widely used by English-educated Egyptians in the correct English sense (since the Arabic word for "typical" isn't commonly used). Very soon, non-English speaking Egyptians somehow believed it to mean "identical" (my analysis is that the word "typical" sounds a bit like the Arabic "tibk al asl" which means identical), and is now predominantly used in that sense. It drives me mad!
e.g. "This handbag is typical (pronounced "tebical") to the one I bought last week!"

Another one is "already", which is used by one and all regardless of whether or not they speak English. The problem is that in Arabic there is no word meaning exclusively "already", but there is a word (fe'lan or belfe'l) that means "really, actually, already". So people, having been told that "already" means "fe'lan" are constantly using it in the sense of "really".

So don't be too harsh on the English misusing foreign words - who doesn't!

[Edited at 2010-05-03 23:51 GMT]


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Maurizio Spagnuolo  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 06:58
English to Italian
... May 3, 2010

Lingua 5B wrote:


Here is what Google Translate says for Italian:

un hamburger

due hamburger

tre hamburger

No plural suffixes! And hamburger is an English word, of course.

I found the same for the English word "bar"

That's interesting, because we do pluralize English words with our native plural suffixes.


I'm happy Google Translate confirms the Accademia della crusca

So, no plurals for English words in Italian (at least for established words such as hamburger, film, bar, cocktail, etc.)


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Brian Young  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:58
Danish to English
typical and totally May 3, 2010

Those are among the most used, abused, and misused words in the English language. Teenagers in particular use those words constantly, also "like". Man, that is just typical, and like just totally---. Teenagerese you might call it.

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Jared Tabor
Local time: 02:58
SITE STAFF
Re: Bimbo bread May 4, 2010

Linda Kelly wrote:

... is actually a brand of bread in Spain. The sight of the Bimbo factory is a source of much sniggering for British tourists here!


This might be going OT, but we've got Bimbo bread here in Argentina too. So you can buy a package of Bimbo hamburger buns, and combine them with the hilariously (and adequately) named "Barfy" hamburgers.

Jared


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Lingua 5B  Identity Verified
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Local time: 06:58
English to Croatian
+ ...
Yes. May 4, 2010

Maurizio Spagnuolo wrote:
I'm happy Google Translate confirms the Accademia della crusca

So, no plurals for English words in Italian (at least for established words such as hamburger, film, bar, cocktail, etc.)


Google MT seems to process very simple phrases nicely! I just saw it translated "two hamburgers" correctly into my native language, that's why I trusted it for Italian too.

Yes, it obviously applies to the words of English origin commonly used in modern Italian.


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NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 00:58
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

Moderator of this forum
Spag May 4, 2010

Here the English side of the menu will offer you spaghetti, but the French side will offer "des spaguettis" because presumably you'll have more than one.

Kinda like the old joke: "Did you get a haircut" "Nah, I got 'em all cut" - in French we get our hairs cut, as most of us (not all, I grant you!) have more than one.


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Brian Young  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:58
Danish to English
seamanship May 4, 2010

One of the first things you learn as a seaman is never to piss to windward. However, you might be told to go piss up a rope. Either activity can have unintended consequences.
If it's "urination", is it it "urinations"? We do say "bowel movement" and "bowel movements", so I guess "urinations" would be acceptable. But "piss", and "pisses", no, that doesn't sound right.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 06:58
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
When in a Spanish restaurant... May 4, 2010

...try our "espaguetis"! Italians say we make them disgustingly soft (and I agree), but this is how our mothers have prepared them ever since pasta exists in Spain.

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