Off topic: True Story! 2 (on accents)
Thread poster: NancyLynn

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 22:13
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

Moderator of this forum
Mar 29, 2004

On that same trip to Spain, the Canadian met a Frenchwoman she had corresponded with for months.
They had seen each other's pictures on their beloved translator's site, Proz, and recognised each other without difficulty.

That's the visual. Now for the oral:

"Hey! You don't have that accent when you write!" exclaimed the Frenchwoman on hearing the Canadian's broad vowels.

Neither do you!! I replied, laughing.

I am aware of the tremendous accent variations in my two languages. What about yours? Do you sometimes feel you are not speaking the same language, beacuse of the differences in your accents?

Nancy:-)


 

Edward Potter  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 04:13
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Chinese Mar 29, 2004

I was once asked to make a call to Glasgow for a friend who didn't speak English. I figured it would be simple being American and having lived abroad for many years, listening to all sorts of accents - including ex-pat Scots, though adapting their way of speaking English when abroad.

My friend enjoyed the perplexed look on my face as I kept asking the man on the other end to please repeat what he was saying again and again. After finishing the broken conversation with the Glasgow native and hanging up I concluded that the official language in Glasgow must be Chinese.


 

Karine Piera  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:13
English to French
+ ...
English and French Mar 30, 2004

I am a French girl leaving in the UK, unfortunately (for my accent)in Newcastle. And here is the problem: the French people I meet here come from the South (I do not have a clue why) and have a disctinctive accent compared to mine, but there is worse: the Geordie accent. Therefore, I never really speak English, I speak Geordie with a French accent, and when I speak French with English people, I take the Geordie accent to be understood. I am dreading the time I have to go back to France!!! Which accent will I have?????

Big mistake, and I am deeply sorry about it:
I am living in Newcastle of courseicon_eek.gif)

[Edited at 2004-04-07 18:01]


 

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 22:13
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

Moderator of this forum
TOPIC STARTER
Québec and France Mar 30, 2004

Case in point:
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/675173#answ_1708108

Conversations between Quebeckers and French from "the old country" are usually peppered by the term "rigolo", which means funny -- the French really find our French quaint!!:lol: I love these differences, the uniqueness of various dialects, it does make for humour, which after all is the best medicineicon_smile.gif(and some things the Fench say are, naturally, rigolo to us;-) )
Nancy


 

Michael Bastin  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 04:13
English to French
+ ...
Canadian French and Belgian French Apr 6, 2004

I had to laugh so much recently when a friend from Québec French was talking about a "gugusse" meaning "a thing", I really was wondering what he meant, than I said to myselh "ahh, right "un brol"" (a "thing" too, word coming from Flemish I guess), and we were just laughing because if a French had been in the same room he would have wondered what the hell we were talking about. ahah

Maybe off-off topic but I had to share it.

I must admit it's really rigolo to see these differences...icon_smile.gif


 

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 22:13
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

Moderator of this forum
TOPIC STARTER
Not off topic at all, Michael! Apr 6, 2004

This is exactly the thing I mean - how several people speaking the same language may need sub-titles to understand one anothericon_lol.gif

I asked the French lady's husband if he would have another beer : "Tu chauffes pas à soir?' coming out of my mouth, the Franco-Ontarian, it sounds like
toohhhhauffpahahswarrrrr

Not very grammatical in the first rendition either, I hasten to add...

Somehow, he understood me. Who else does?:lol:

Nancy
-4 and sunny 8)


 

Roberta Anderson  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 04:13
Member (2001)
English to Italian
+ ...
different flavours Apr 7, 2004

My husband and I met in Milan, 13 yrs ago.
I had just returned to Italy, after 10 yrs in Scotland.
My husband-to-be, German, had just arrived in Italy after a year in NY.
I didn't speak German and he didn't speak Italian.
So we communicated in English... or rather: my Italian-flavoured Scottish (at the time I had quite a pronounced Scottish accent with an Italian lilt, and people used to compliment me on my Italian!) and his German-American.
I had to repeat everything twice - first as it came to me, then adapting it so that he would understand it...


 

Florence Bremond  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 04:13
Member (2002)
English to French
+ ...
Feeling targetted...:-) Apr 7, 2004

Nancy I have to confess that my husband has been most interested in the new words that you taught him...now and then he finds the way to use themicon_smile.gif:-)

But these differences do not always require such a distance: I have been brought up in Nantes and moved 50 km down south later. Not far at all, but a very different culture and language. Years later, I still sometimes have difficulties understanding my neighbors and last year I have bought a bilingual dictionary
"Dictionnaire français/poitevin" (or "dicciounaere françaes/poetevin-séntunjhaes")which is most usefulicon_smile.gifsince I'm told that I'm "parlài poentus"!!

[Edited at 2004-04-07 12:58]


 

Angela Arnone  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:13
Member (2004)
Italian to English
+ ...
Geordie rules OK Apr 7, 2004

And what is wrong with a fine Geordie accent, hinny?
I have a cracking one myself and I manage ok!!!
Seriously, Geordie is a very "trendy" accent to have these days and you are very lucky to be able to spend time in my old hunting grounds.
Get yourself off to the Rendezvous Cafe on Whitley Bay promenade and ask my Auntie Maria for an ice cream: she's Italian and speaks English with a perfectly comprehensible and very musical Geordie accent.
Gan canny pet

karine1 wrote:

I am a French girl leaving in the UK, unfortunately (for my accent)in Newcastle.


 

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 22:13
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

Moderator of this forum
TOPIC STARTER
Angela Apr 7, 2004

I looooove your accent, I could listen to you all day.icon_smile.gif
I guess that means you are easy on the ears as well as on the eyesicon_smile.gif
Have a great day everyone
Nancy


 

Karine Piera  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:13
English to French
+ ...
Geordie accent Apr 7, 2004

I probably didn't express myself in the best way speaking about the Geordie accent, but believe me, there is not only the accent but rather kind of a different dialect here.
BTW, I am going to Withley Bay tomorrow evening, therefore I might have the opportunity to pay a visit to our aunt.
I'll let you know, of course.:o)


 

two2tango  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 00:13
Member
English to Spanish
+ ...
Chinese + Double Dutch to me Apr 7, 2004

Edward Potter wrote:

I concluded that the official language in Glasgow must be Chinese.


I know how you must have felt, Edward, I felt more or less the same, but as I am not English, I thought it was only me who had problems in understanding Glasgwegians. My experience:
When I lived in England, back in 1975 (until 1978) a friend of a friend was usually invited to our Latin American parties, her name was Rose ( a very friendly and smiling person) from Glasgow, but I never understood a word she said, even though I tried hard!!

Haydéeicon_smile.gif


 

Angela Arnone  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:13
Member (2004)
Italian to English
+ ...
gerraway with yer all! Apr 7, 2004

I understand Glaswegians perfectly well.... in fact I have some lovely stories to tell about a Scots Pipe Band that came to my little town in Abruzzo and played bagpipes. I was their interpreter and even people who spoke very good English kept coming to express their astonishment at how difficult it was to understand them. The lads thought it was very funny as most people really only wanted to know what they had on under their kilts.... and when I said "Is anything worn under the kilt?" they replied "No dear it's aye in working orrrderrr...."
On the other hand there is a well-known WWII story about the crack German troops sent to Oxford to learn English so they could be parachuted across the UK and infiltrate as part of the master plan prior to full invasion. Sadly (or not depending on which side you're on), the first pair landed in the Northumbrian countryside and were unable to make themselves understood and were arrested immediately ....

For Karine, I was kidding, kidda! We're well known for our sense of humour and you should get a copy of "Larn yersel Geordie" and bear in mind that Geordies are perfectly understood in Scandinavia for historic invasion reasons, that you do need to speak perfect Geordie to join the Toon Army (Newcastle United Football Club), that Sting (who is an old friend of mine) is a Geordie, not to mention the Knopflers (Dire Straits).
Have a lovely evening in Whitley Bay and mind the marras (boys!).
Thanks to Nancy for her kind words... the esteem is mutual!
Angela


 

two2tango  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 00:13
Member
English to Spanish
+ ...
A wealth of Geordie jokes Apr 8, 2004

You can find them at http://www.geordiepride.demon.co.uk/100jokes.htm

Geordie the Film Critic
Geordie and Tucker were discussing films. Tucker says "Ye shud gaan te the Roxy the neet, ther's a grand pictor on - Moby Dick". "I divvent think aall bother", says Geordie, "Aah care nowt for them sex pictors". "Divvint be daft!" says Tucker, "It's nowt te de wuth sex. it's aall aboot whales". "Aah divvent like Welsh pictors either" says Geordie.


Haydeeicon_smile.gif


 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

True Story! 2 (on accents)

Advanced search






CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »
SDL Trados Studio 2019 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2019 has evolved to bring translators a brand new experience. Designed with user experience at its core, Studio 2019 transforms how new users get up and running, helps experienced users make the most of the powerful features, ensures new

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search