Off topic: Popular current phrases in other languages
Thread poster: LingoTrust
LingoTrust
Local time: 10:13
Apr 18, 2013

I help run a language blog site, and I wanted to do a post about current popular phrases that are used in other languages.

For instance, in America, "YOLO" is a new, popular, trendy phrase (stands for You Only Live Once). I don't think it will stand the test of time, so to speak, but it is popular now. I'm looking for similar phrases that are new, current, and trendy in other languages.

Does anyone have any suggestions? If you'd like, I can credit you with your submission if I use it. Just let me know if you'd like to be credited or not.


Thanks!


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Dave Bindon  Identity Verified
Greece
Local time: 17:13
Member (2010)
Greek to English
Greece Apr 18, 2013

Something which became annoyingly common in Greece 2-3 years ago (no more than 3) was «Τυχαίο; Δεν νομίζω!» [Tiheo? Then nomizo! (By chance/a coincidence? I don't think so!)]

It became popular as the final line of a series of TV adverts (for a 'directory enquiries' telephone service, if I remember correctly). The ads have stopped (or I've stopped noticing them) so the phrase is used less often now, but it's stayed in the public conscience and I reckon it'll stay for at least a generation.


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Hin und Wieder  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 16:13
Member (2012)
German to Dutch
+ ...
Even Apeldoorn bellen... Apr 18, 2013

It means: have to call Apeldoorn. It's a insurance company slogan. Apeldoorn is the city where the office is. The sentence is used when someone did something stupid. The commercials on television were nice!

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Noni Gilbert
Spain
Local time: 16:13
Spanish to English
+ ...
Advertisements behind so many of these catchphrases Apr 18, 2013

And how annoying so many of them are. As others have said, they may be quite short-lived - thank goodness.

I remember "me lo quedo" from a Corte Inglés ad here in Spain ("I'll have it" about deciding to buy something) - used to make me want to lynch the poor innocent children who spouted it!

I promise, I'm normally quite a nice person....


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LingoTrust
Local time: 10:13
TOPIC STARTER
thanks Apr 18, 2013

Thank you for your responses so far! I'm trying to get around 10 or so, so keep them coming if you have any more!

Anybody not want to be credited on the blog post?


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Tim Drayton  Identity Verified
Cyprus
Local time: 17:13
Turkish to English
+ ...
dumur Apr 19, 2013

The word 'dumur' in Turkish was always an obscure technical term in biology meaning, exactly, 'atrophy'.
A few years ago, it, for some strange reason, found popular use in a number of expressions with the meaning of 'surprise' or 'astonishment'. Thus the expression 'dumura uğramak', literally to 'undergo atrophy', entered popular speech with the meaning 'be surprised/astonished'.
I think its use in this popular sense has waned somewhat. I always thought that the semantic leap from 'atrophy' to 'surprise' was a huge one.


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Rad Graban  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:13
English to Slovak
+ ...
Simples! Apr 19, 2013

http://www.macmillandictionary.com/buzzword/entries/simples.html

Not other language though.

[Edited at 2013-04-19 10:50 GMT]


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Zamira*****  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:13
Member (2006)
English to Uzbek
+ ...
Ty kto takoy? Davay, do svidaniya! ( "Who are you? See you, goodbye!") Apr 19, 2013

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ty_kto_takoy?_Davay,_do_svidaniya!

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Gerard de Noord  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 16:13
Member (2003)
German to Dutch
+ ...
Des doods Apr 20, 2013

I think it started with the Dutch expression “de poule des doods”, the group of death, when a Dutch football team has very strong opponents in an international championship. “Des doods” is an obsolete genitive form in our language and nowadays the Dutch generally use it tongue-in-cheek. Anything can be “des doods”: thunderstorms, snowflakes, cats, traffic jams, a mother-in-law or a car wash.

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David Friemann, MA  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 16:13
English to German
des doods Apr 20, 2013

Gerard de Noord wrote:

I think it started with the Dutch expression “de poule des doods”, the group of death, when a Dutch football team has very strong opponents in an international championship. “Des doods” is an obsolete genitive form in our language and nowadays the Dutch generally use it tongue-in-cheek. Anything can be “des doods”: thunderstorms, snowflakes, cats, traffic jams, a mother-in-law or a car wash.


This is so funny, I should start using that in German immediately. Just image the Autowäsche des Todes...Although, it will probably make everything sound like a horrible horror movie...


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LingoTrust
Local time: 10:13
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks again! Apr 22, 2013

Thanks again for your help.

Here is the link to see the blog post from your suggestions.

http://www.lackuna.com/2013/04/22/popular-trendy-sayings-in-foreign-countries/

Again, let me know if you'd like to be cited on the post!


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