Pages in topic:   [1 2 3] >
Off topic: So...
Thread poster: Tom in London

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:23
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Jan 20, 2016

Funny cartoon in the latest edition of "Private Eye" (unfortunately posting an image here is like going back to DOS, so I'm not going to try).

The drawing is quite simple: one man talking to another, saying

"So my New Year's resolution this year is to stop saying 'so' at the beginning of every sentence".


 

Merab Dekano  Identity Verified
Spain
Member (2014)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Honestly, frankly speaking, actually... Jan 20, 2016

Tom in London wrote:

Funny cartoon in the latest edition of "Private Eye" (unfortunately posting an image here is like going back to DOS, so I'm not going to try).

The drawing is quite simple: one man talking to another, saying

"So my New Year's resolution this year is to stop saying 'so' at the beginning of every sentence".


"So" is funny, but there are others.. Even though not a native speaker, it does bother me when I hear:

- Actually, ... (why, would it otherwise be a false affirmation?)
- Honestly,... (why, were you otherwise going to be dishonest with me?)
- Frankly speaking,... (what? Are you usually that unforthcoming?)

In Spanish we use a lot "sinceramente". I once heard a humourist saying "sinceramente sí, pero sin sinceramente no", which pretty much describes how pathetic the expression is.


 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:23
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
Quite Jan 20, 2016

So to be perfectly honest with you, I have to quite literally say, sort of, you know....

[Edited at 2016-01-20 11:19 GMT]


 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:23
Spanish to English
+ ...
Peccata minuta Jan 20, 2016

The way I see it, minor foibles like the ones mentioned are simply part and parcel of normal speech. Not worth getting one's knickers in a twist over, vamos.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phatic_expression

PS: Some people even get irritated by the three dots...

[Edited at 2016-01-20 11:36 GMT]
PPS: Or "moist"...

[Edited at 2016-01-20 11:37 GMT]
http://mentalfloss.com/article/64984/science-behind-why-people-hate-word-moist

(My own personal bugbear is apostrophe abuse... but don't get me started on that!)

[Edited at 2016-01-20 11:41 GMT]


 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:23
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
You're not here Jan 20, 2016

neilmac wrote:

The way I see it, minor foibles like the ones mentioned are simply part and parcel of normal speech. Not worth getting one's knickers in a twist over


You're in Spain, so you're not hearing it every day, all the time.


 

Noni Gilbert  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:23
Spanish to English
+ ...
Frequently heard on the lips of candidates at interview... Jan 20, 2016

"To be honest....."

So [sic], were you not being honest up until now?


 

Daniel Bird  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:23
German to English
It's a funny/peculiar usage; how did it creep into such widespread use? Jan 20, 2016

I think I first noticed it being used some years ago, overwhelmingly by technocrats, scientists and the like, groups that are typically seen as poor communicators (however unjust that might be). Maybe it was originally a jargon or trade lingo usage that existed in the academic echo chamber but escaped.
It's most certainly out in the wild now so we'd best get used to it.


 

Marco Solinas  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:23
Italian to English
+ ...
? Jan 20, 2016

So...what?

 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:23
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
It will disappear Jan 21, 2016

Daniel Bird wrote:

I think I first noticed it being used some years ago, overwhelmingly by technocrats, scientists and the like, groups that are typically seen as poor communicators (however unjust that might be). Maybe it was originally a jargon or trade lingo usage that existed in the academic echo chamber but escaped.
It's most certainly out in the wild now so we'd best get used to it.


Only those living in an English-speaking country will be aware of it.

Like so many linguistic fads, I'm willing to bet that people will eventually stop saying it.

.....I hope.


 

Lingua 5B  Identity Verified
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Local time: 20:23
German to Serbian
+ ...
Precisely. Jan 21, 2016

Marco Solinas wrote:

So...what?


You hit the nail on the head : )


 

Dan Lucas  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:23
Member (2014)
Japanese to English
It's not just "so..." Jan 21, 2016

Tom in London wrote:
Like so many linguistic fads, I'm willing to bet that people will eventually stop saying it.
.....I hope.

As do I.

Unfortunately "So..." often seems to be accompanied by uptalk - another annoying mannerism.

Dan


 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:23
Member (2008)
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
Fry Jan 21, 2016

Dan Lucas wrote:

Tom in London wrote:
Like so many linguistic fads, I'm willing to bet that people will eventually stop saying it.
.....I hope.

As do I.

Unfortunately "So..." often seems to be accompanied by uptalk - another annoying mannerism.

Dan


Yes -and uptalk PLUS the dreaded glottal fry.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7BBNEwyOjw

[Edited at 2016-01-21 09:21 GMT]


 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 20:23
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Anything is better than øøøøøøøøøh Jan 21, 2016

English doesn't really have an equivalent for this Danish vowel, but it is ugly if unnecessarily prolonged. Something in the direction of eu in French neveu, perhaps.

We had a politician who could go on and on with the 'Øøøøøøøøøøøøøøøø...' when interviewed, and used it as a comma mid-sentence. Someone told her in the end, and then we could go back to laughing at the really odd things she said. She ended up as a comissioner in th EU.

Many Danes who ought to know better say 'Yes, but' (Jamen...) at the beginning of every utterance. It drives others mad, and often sounds silly in answer to a question. (Hope I don't say it too often myself!) icon_biggrin.gif


 

Kay Denney  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:23
Member (Apr 2018)
French to English
so like Jan 21, 2016

Tom in London wrote:

neilmac wrote:

The way I see it, minor foibles like the ones mentioned are simply part and parcel of normal speech. Not worth getting one's knickers in a twist over


You're in Spain, so you're not hearing it every day, all the time.


So I'm in France, but I'm hearing and reading it plenty, it's all over FB for ex and I do have native English speaking friends here. Wouldn't say it was worth getting uptight over, although I certainly would refrain from using it like that in a translation, unless specifically required to use teenspeak.

I did laugh at the joke though.


 

Balasubramaniam L.  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 23:53
English to Hindi
+ ...
So I am not the only one Jan 21, 2016

I use so quite liberally myself, especially in unguarded writing as in forum posts. I often come back to my posts later to extirpate them.

I am glad to learn that this is not my foible alone and natives too are prone to this tendency.


 
Pages in topic:   [1 2 3] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

So...

Advanced search






PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »
BaccS – Business Accounting Software
Modern desktop project management for freelance translators

BaccS makes it easy for translators to manage their projects, schedule tasks, create invoices, and view highly customizable reports. User-friendly, ProZ.com integration, community-driven development – a few reasons BaccS is trusted by translators!

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search