School vs. University
Thread poster: Aniello Scognamiglio
Aniello Scognamiglio  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:35
English to German
+ ...
Apr 2, 2009

Dear fellow translators,

this morning I came across this information:
http://www.proz.com/translator_associations/313?country_code=&group_type=offers_accreditation

In the field "Organization type" it says "School". However, the FASK is a prestigious university!
Isn't there a difference between "school" and "university"?

Thanks, A.S.


PS: Dear moderator, if this is the wrong forum, please move the thread to the appropriate forum.


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Stephen Rifkind  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 13:35
Member (2004)
French to English
+ ...
collective and specific Apr 2, 2009

University is to school as a jet is to aircraft. The question "which school did you go to?" is very context specific, with an answer ranging from elementry school to PHd program.

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Paul Adie  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Spanish to English
+ ...
American usage Apr 2, 2009

'School' can be used to mean higher education in the US, but in the UK it only refers to primary and secondary education.

Happy translating!

Paul

Edited to add:

There are instances where 'school' refers to university in a UK context, for example:
School of Oriental and African Studies
London School of Economics and Political Science

However, I doubt that these would be refered to as 'schools' by actual students.

[Edited at 2009-04-02 07:24 GMT]

Another edit:

Some of my friends are lucky enough to go to Glasgow School of Art, but this is university-level education. It seems that the situation is not as black and white as I had first hoped!

[Edited at 2009-04-02 09:50 GMT]

[Edited at 2009-04-02 09:51 GMT]


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Rebecca Hendry  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:35
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Medical school Apr 2, 2009

Paul Adie wrote:

'School' can be used to mean higher education in the US, but in the UK it only refers to primary and secondary education.

Happy translating!

Paul

Edited to add:

There are instances where 'school' refers to university in a UK context, for example:
School of Oriental and African Studies
London School of Economics and Political Science

However, I doubt that these would be refered to as 'schools' by actual students.

[Edited at 2009-04-02 07:24 GMT]


I agree with everything Paul says here, and would add that in the UK we also refer to "medical school", for example. Here it is understood that what is being referred to is university training for students wishing to become doctors.


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 12:35
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
School is not just for children ;-) Apr 2, 2009

I think Paul Adie is right.
In the UK people of a certain age say 'when I was at college' - which may cover anything from university to a short vocational course.

But 'School' can go right to the top in education and research.

One of the best universities in Denmark called itself 'Aarhus School of Business' in English. It has now merged administratively with the other university in the city, the University of Aarhus, but the faculties and degree courses retain their identities.

Many universities have Schools of this or that field of study:
School of Dentistry, School of Librarianship, School of Philosophy ... or whatever their specialism is.

A 'school of thought' is generally quite advanced.

I have a constant discussion with Danish clients, because the language does not reflect the nuances between training, instruction and education in quite the same way as English does, and they call it all 'education' in English because they think it sounds 'better'. In English you have a 'higher education', but train as a teacher, engineer, librarian etc. etc...

'Et kursus' in Danish is not necessarily the same as a course in English.

It strikes some Danes at least as false modesty when we talk about schools and training, as opposed to education and study, but that is not how we see it. They are just different, even though they overlap!

I am not enough of a classical scholar to explain why we make the distinctions the way we do... Maybe someone else can.





[Edited at 2009-04-02 07:55 GMT]


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Paula González Fernández  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 12:35
English to Spanish
+ ...
school as "faculty" Apr 2, 2009

I've seen it and heard it as part of a University: the school of languages, the school of... at ...University. Also Babylon says so.

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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 12:35
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
You have a point, I think Apr 2, 2009

italengger wrote:
In the field "Organization type" it says "School". However, the FASK is a prestigious university!


I see your point. I think there should be a standardised terminology for these pages, so that words mean the same things in all entries.

In this case, the word "school" is given as an answer to the question "What kind of organisation is this?" I agree that one can speak of a medical school but would the students there really have answered "it is a school" when asked what kind of training institution it is? Perhaps, I don't know. I myself studied at my local university's "School of Teachers' Training" but I would never answer "at a school" if any had asked where I studied translation.

So I think the terms in that field just need to be standardised a bit.


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Trans-Marie
Local time: 11:35
English to German
+ ...
Law School Apr 2, 2009

as in Harvard Law School.

Paula is right in that it is often used in the sense of faculty.


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Jocelyne S  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 12:35
Member
French to English
+ ...
SOAS + LSE = parts of UL Apr 2, 2009

Paul Adie wrote:

Edited to add:

There are instances where 'school' refers to university in a UK context, for example:
School of Oriental and African Studies
London School of Economics and Political Science

However, I doubt that these would be refered to as 'schools' by actual students.

[Edited at 2009-04-02 07:24 GMT]

Another edit:

Some of my friends are lucky enough to go to Glasgow School of Art, but this is university-level education. It seems that the situation is not as black and white as I had first hoped!

[Edited at 2009-04-02 09:50 GMT]

[Edited at 2009-04-02 09:51 GMT]


I agree with all the others. I just wanted to point out that SOAS and LSE are both part of the University of London, in much the same way a law school is part of a larger university.

They certainly are considered universities. (I don't know about the Glasgow School of Art.)

Best,
Jocelyne


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Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 06:35
Spanish to English
+ ...
In the U.S., at least, it can mean "university" Apr 2, 2009

As has already been noted, in the U.S. the word "school" is broad in meaning.

When my friends and I were 18, I remember that we asked "What school did you get into?" about as often as we asked "What college did you get into?"

I attended Rutgers: The State University of New Jersey, which is often described as "a state school."

In the U.S., an institution that grants bachelor degrees but not masters or doctorates isn't usually considered a university; it's a college. The advantage of putting "school" on a form is that it takes up less space than writing "college or university" or "institution of higher education."

[Edited at 2009-04-02 14:13 GMT]


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Phil Bird
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:35
Spanish to English
+ ...
College is a can of worms as well... Apr 2, 2009

In the UK, when we talk about a college, we are often talking about tertiary institutions which are lower than universities - Further Education colleges....

But,

Various universities are 'divided' into colleges - Notably Oxford, Cambridge and also the various bits of the University of London.


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KSL Berlin  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 11:35
Member (2003)
German to English
+ ...
College can be a problem in the US as well Apr 2, 2009

I remember my maid in Oregon once telling me proudly that her daughter was about to complete college. I was rather surprised given the family's hostility to education of most kinds as well as their various religious obsessions. I asked "which one?", thinking probably OSU or maybe U of O in Eugene or even one of the nearby community colleges (which generally offer at most a two-year associate degree). No, she meant "beauty college" and probably didn't know there was any difference between that and, say, Harvey Mudd or Occidental. "Business colleges" are another example of vocational institutions that are far removed in purpose and practice from what one would find at a "school of business", for example.

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